View Full Version : Meanings of Level of Play



viver
12-31-2000, 07:17 PM
Hi,

I am just curious to know this forum participants views on players' level opinions. I was playing with my friends and heard them discussing about playing standards. Also often I see posts where players mention they are in beginners, intermediate or advanced levels.

Opinions differ how to qualify a player level. Would the participants be interested to voice their opinion on this subject?

Thanks and regards,

Viver

Byro-Nenium
12-31-2000, 10:43 PM
I play for UWC here in Singapore and i rank 5th for my college team. But i only see my self as an intermediate player and not an advanced player because i feel that there is still alot that i can improve on......

viver
01-01-2001, 08:30 PM
Thank you for your answer but I should apologize for my question was not clear. I like to hear from the participants how they classify players according to their playing level. For example, what are the necessary skills a player must master, in your opinion to be qualified an intermediate level player. Like in your case, you classify yourself as an intermediate level player, so could you please comment the skills you posess and what you lack to become an advanced player?

Thanks,
Viver

cooler
01-01-2001, 10:01 PM
i recommends the following badminton levels for player only, not for coaching levels:

1. Entry
2. Beginner
3. Intermediate
4. Advanced
5. Professional
6. Legend


cooler

Cheung
01-02-2001, 08:04 AM
Hmm,

I have four grades of good according to the tone that I use.
Anybody who qualifies as good can always beat me!

Such a difficult question to answer....

kwun
01-02-2001, 08:39 PM
play standard is really difficult to determine. as they are not absolute and transitive. player A may beat player B who beats player C, but player C in turn can beat player A.

one way that people use is by the competition level people play, here in US, there are level A/B/C, however, different country's levels are different. i am sure level C in say, Hongkong is higher than level C in the US.

in HK, there is something call the badminton medal (or something like that) where players are assessed through an examiner, if they pass, they get a medal certifying they are of a certain standard. there is bronze, silver and gold. and supposedly the gold is really rare and is only given by the governer or something like that.

i had a coach when i was a kid, she was in the HK team (or train with the HK team), and she only got a silver.

viver
01-04-2001, 12:49 AM
The exact reason than brought me writing this question is exactly Kwun just said. We meet here regularly on the Internet and live in different parts of the globe, surely badminton stantdards are different. That's why I was curious to hear everybody's opinion about standards and players' level classification.

Viver

vince poon
01-07-2001, 01:00 AM
In that case, I rank myself as an intermediate player. In order for me to get to advanced level, I have to improve my clear to go deeper, faster, and be more consistent; improve my drop to have better angle, faster, and more consistent; improve my smash to lightning fast; improve my court coverage like Fung Permadi; and reduce my age to 15 years younger. Once I improve all this area, I rank myself as an advanced player and probably play for team Canada.

TDotSmAsHer
03-07-2002, 05:22 PM
I'm considered a intermediate player now... but I just wanted to know how one judges if the opponent is beginner, intermediate or advance. If advance means that you can smash hard, I know some beginners - intermediates that can smash harder then intermediate players and some advance players because they are built strong and have other sports backgrounds. What are some characteristics that make a player beginnner/intermediate/advance?

LeeLloyd
03-08-2002, 12:38 AM
There probably is a difference... but I don't think anyone around knows what the difference between 'beginner', 'intermediate' and 'advance' is...
In a sport like badminton (and maybe in all sports) there is no real definition of beginner, intermediate and advance... at least not that I know of... (but HEY.. who am I??)
I believe everyone should judge their own... based on their own skills.. but not based on some words..like beginners, intermediate and advance.. for there is no real definition of them... (maybe one of you other guys knows the definitions)...

Out:
LeeLloyd

Mag
03-08-2002, 04:44 AM
Intermediate is when you learn the secret handshake.

Advanced is when you stop worrying about questions like the one you asked.

trapped-never
03-08-2002, 05:45 AM
It looks like I am an advanced begginer acording to your description...

My definition:
if you think you are beginer you are beginer
if you think you are intermediate you are beginer
if you think you are advanced you are probably intermediate
if you are getting your rackets and shuttles for free you are finaly advanced

badrad
03-08-2002, 10:38 PM
beginner - yeah, my rubber shuttle is good for another year.
intermediate - yeah, my nylon shuttle should last another week.
advanced - get this piece of crap nylon off the court!!

|R|S
03-09-2002, 08:20 AM
i think i read this in one of the articles on the net...

beginner - your are not thinking... you are not placing the shuttle, you are just trying your best to get the shuttle across to the other side

intermediate - you begin to take notice your opponent's weakness, start to be able to place your shots and able to go aim at your opponent's weakness. Start to form strategies b4 the game

advamce - you will be attacking your opponent's weakness constantly and you will be placing the shuttle where it is hard for your opponent to reach and you form strategies/tactics for a sequence of shots to kill your opponent during the game

UkPlayer
03-09-2002, 05:47 PM
lol - very good

Jason
03-09-2002, 06:00 PM
Well... I think this is only from the prespective of the mental game... cuz me... I'm not any good with my "basic skill" (yes... I'm not good at all ><) but I notice opponent's weaknessed when i play against them. However... since my skill is no good (actually... lemme rephrase that "wut skill"??? ^^" ) sometimes i cannot manage to direct my shots with pin point(or semi-pinpoint) acuracy like many of my friends who have been playing for a long time... so... i totally agree with you if you're speaking from a mental game point of view... but from an all round point of view... skill should still be considered as a huge factor~

THE ABOVE IS ONLY A PERSONAL OPPINION... IF YOU DISAGREE WITH THE ABOVE POINTS MADE.... PLEASE DO NOT TRY TO HUNT ME DOWN ^^"

cheers~
Jason

badrad
03-10-2002, 12:24 AM
check out how the parks and rec at Richmond define the three levels:

http://www.city.richmond.bc.ca/leisure/springguide/sports.pdf

viver
03-10-2002, 02:11 AM
It's not easy to objectivelly classify a player skills level. Technique is very subjective and most often than not are evaluated by experts. Following is my opinion (a quick one) on skills level:
Beginner:
- able to clear (forehand and backhand to baseline), drop and smash;
- footwork to 4 corners of the court;
Intermediate:
- able to clear with under-hand techniques (returning shuttles from baseline to baseline in full strectch);
- able to use footwork accordingly depending on situation (i.e. pressuring and under pressure);
- able to follow tactical instructions;
Advanced:
- able to form tactics against opponents;
- able to vary tactics during matches;

LazyBuddy
11-19-2002, 10:06 AM
I have seen ppl talking about "level B, level A, level C, etc" for player (not elite, just regular club members) rating. However, I have no idea how this rating works. Just wonder, how to rate myself? Is there a certain standard to follow? Or, just purely "self feeling"?

benfok
11-19-2002, 10:49 AM
I ususally rate myself relative to players around me. I would compare basic skills, stance, footwork and power level. I would ask myself how I would match with with this particular person in a single match.

I would also pay attention in doubles to see how others work with their partners.

I think it is to coarse of a measurement with just Level A, B, or C because there might be areas that you are good at and areas that you need to inprove.

Ben

RedDog
11-19-2002, 11:05 AM
Originally posted by LazyBuddy
I have seen ppl talking about "level B, level A, level C, etc" for player (not elite, just regular club members) rating. However, I have no idea how this rating works. Just wonder, how to rate myself? Is there a certain standard to follow? Or, just purely "self feeling"?

When people are talking about level A, B, C, D, it's the tournament level they're playing in. With "A" being the top, and "D" is the lowest. It is not how you feel your level is.

If you want to know what level you're at, you can try to play in a few tournament and see if you get a compatible match in that level. Normally, people who just started playing in tournaments, they will start in a lower level, maybe C or D. Unless you have confidence that you're much better then average players in your club, maybe you can start in B. And everytime you win in the level, you move up a level, however, it also depends on how big the tournament is. I would say, it's fair to stay in that level and win twice, after getting fist place two times in that level, you should move up to a higher level.

There are also different opinions of levels in different geographical area can be a little different. So at some places, the level D would equal to C at other places.

jwu
11-19-2002, 11:26 AM
I too also am wondering how this rating system works but since I've never played any tournaments, it would be hard to rate myself. However, I have gone to this one club near me where a lot of national ranked players played. So yeah, best way to rate yourself is by playing with people of known ranking and rating and see how you compare with them.

LazyBuddy
11-19-2002, 11:53 AM
Originally posted by RedDog
When people are talking about level A, B, C, D, it's the tournament level they're playing in. With "A" being the top, and "D" is the lowest. It is not how you feel your level is.



So, u mean, the "level" is actually the tournament's level??? Not for players? So, the level of tournament that a player participate the most (of course, with respectful result, not just 1st round out every single time), is his level... hmmm...

Then, another stupid question, how to rate the tournament then??? How did the ppl who organize , to rate the current tournament?

RedDog
11-19-2002, 12:08 PM
Originally posted by LazyBuddy
So, u mean, the "level" is actually the tournament's level??? Not for players? So, the level of tournament that a player participate the most (of course, with respectful result, not just 1st round out every single time), is his level... hmmm...

Then, another stupid question, how to rate the tournament then??? How did the ppl who organize , to rate the current tournament?

I'm so Sorry, I must of confused you badly... It's not the "tournament level"...normally, in a tournament, it will have 4 flights (or levels) A, B, C and D. And you can sign up for the flight that fits your own level. Does that make more sense?

LazyBuddy
11-19-2002, 12:22 PM
Oh, I see...

Guess tournament that I participate were not that formalized... They only have sections for "MS, MD, LS, LD, XD". Maybe age group, too. Never see them put level A, B, C, etc around...

hehehehheeh...

Joanne
11-20-2002, 09:12 AM
Yeah, I've also been wondering, how do0 you rate your self? I've had a friend to tell me that she's in advance level and she's not good at all!

LazyBuddy
11-20-2002, 09:14 AM
Originally posted by Joanne
Yeah, I've also been wondering, how do0 you rate your self? I've had a friend to tell me that she's in advance level and she's not good at all!


Is that poor girl, who got blew out by u 15-0, but still claimed to have "nature talent"???

Then, I can rate u to be A+++...


:D

bigredlemon
11-22-2002, 01:25 PM
Originally posted by Joanne
Yeah, I've also been wondering, how do0 you rate your self? I've had a friend to tell me that she's in advance level and she's not good at all!

In the clubs i've been to, most "intermediate" and "advanced" players are all the same level, and i'm sure its the same in most regions. Skill level is a regional thing i guess

LIPlayer
11-22-2002, 02:44 PM
Rating anyone's play is a matter of personal judgement usually done in comparision with some already ranked players. Rating is not a science but an art (Ranking may be science that usually based on tournament results). Rating may differ from person to person and may be totally wrong sometime. Many people have tendency to rank themself higher then they actually are. Many tournaments only have A and B levels. Trust me, if you are an "A" level player then you should already know by now. Nobody becomes A level player in vaccum.

The way I look ranking is as follows:

Pros: Full time Badminton player who plays international tournaments.

A+: Player who qualifies to play IBF ranking tournament where some Top world ranking players are also playing.

A : Player who qualifies to play nationally rank tournaments and have good chances to get to Quater Final or highers.

A-:Who is good enough to play in nationally ranked tournaments and also good enough to get to second or third rounds but not good enough to get to QF.

B : Players who plays nationally rank tournaments lose in their first round and then do good in consolation tournament.

B- : Do bad in consolation but good enough to look good in playing badminton.

C: Who can hold some rallies once in a while. May become partner to play doubles with B level. Participates local tournaments (non ranking) but don't get anywhere except having fun.

D: Beginnners: Those who enjoy playing but needs to work on almost everything.

I hope above helps.

kwun
11-22-2002, 02:50 PM
LIP,

i don't agree with the rating. i imagine if that rating is used, then 75% of the people who plays in tournament will be in B-

jwu
11-22-2002, 02:56 PM
Originally posted by kwun
LIP,

i don't agree with the rating. i imagine if that rating is used, then 75% of the people who plays in tournament will be in B-

and 80% of the general badminton population would be D. :D

LIPlayer
11-22-2002, 03:39 PM
Originally posted by jwu
and 80% of the general badminton population would be D. :D

Agree: I would say from personal experience that 80 percents who plays badminton do not go to tournaments. Most of them could be rated as C, and D level players.

By just playing in any tournament does not make a person an "A" level player.

May be I do not want to dilute A level player's acheivement. I believe A level is acheived by less then 5 percent who plays badminton. Next 15 percent can be considered good players that is B level. All remaining 80 percent do belong in C and D level (off course my judgement only).

We tends to overrate players from whom we lose a game. May be we want to justify our loss but that does not make a winner an "A" level player either.

There is nothing wrong to be C or D level. These players, play for fun mostly and that is great. Not everyone has to be so competitive!

kwun
11-22-2002, 03:43 PM
i guess the level is really dependent on the location of the tournament.

if there is one absolute level, then if one go to some location with low level of skills (like the US. :) ) then there will be no one playing level A.

thus i think the level really varies. and in most places, they are some like taking the whole badminton population, and then do a even distribution, 25% A, 25% b, etc.

case in point. i usually play level B/C in the N. Cali area. i was told that the level is higher in S. Cal, and i was also told that if i play a tourney in Hongkong, i will be playing level E.... so there. :)

jwu
11-22-2002, 04:49 PM
Just repeating my quote from before, "there is always someone better than you, and always someone not as good." Your rating depends on your competition and how people perceive your game. Best way to figure it out is just go and try it.

cooler
11-22-2002, 05:13 PM
Originally posted by LIPlayer
Rating anyone's play is a matter of personal judgement usually done in comparision with some already ranked players. Rating is not a science but an art (Ranking may be science that usually based on tournament results). Rating may differ from person to person and may be totally wrong sometime. Many people have tendency to rank themself higher then they actually are. Many tournaments only have A and B levels. Trust me, if you are an "A" level player then you should already know by now. Nobody becomes A level player in vaccum.

The way I look ranking is as follows:

Pros: Full time Badminton player who plays international tournaments.

A+: Player who qualifies to play IBF ranking tournament where some Top world ranking players are also playing.

A : Player who qualifies to play nationally rank tournaments and have good chances to get to Quater Final or highers.

A-:Who is good enough to play in nationally ranked tournaments and also good enough to get to second or third rounds but not good enough to get to QF.

B : Players who plays nationally rank tournaments lose in their first round and then do good in consolation tournament.

B- : Do bad in consolation but good enough to look good in playing badminton.

C: Who can hold some rallies once in a while. May become partner to play doubles with B level. Participates local tournaments (non ranking) but don't get anywhere except having fun.

D: Beginnners: Those who enjoy playing but needs to work on almost everything.

I hope above helps.

what happened to B+, C+, D+, D-??

Cheung
11-22-2002, 06:36 PM
It's even more confusing in England because they have different leagues of different standards. You might be division one player in one league but pretty poor in another.

In M'sia, they don't seem to have much in the way of formalised leagues but you can find really excellent players around.

Met a guy from Holland when I was in Sydney. He said he had a ranking in Holland in the 200's (for doubles). Well, I like to think I am a couple of levels above what he was:)

The best way is go travelling around playing in different countries. (Check out badmintonfanatic link):cool:

LazyBuddy
11-23-2002, 01:49 AM
Originally posted by Cheung
The best way is go travelling around playing in different countries. (Check out badmintonfanatic link):cool:

That's surelly help my badminton rating a lot. However, my bank account and credit card rating won't look too good anymore... :eek: :( :o

Joanne
11-24-2002, 09:23 AM
Originally posted by LazyBuddy
Is that poor girl, who got blew out by u 15-0, but still claimed to have "nature talent"???

Then, I can rate u to be A+++...


:D

Lol, yeah, her. She even said her coach asked her to go and try-out for the Selangor try-outs! And no way and I a A+++ player, lol. :D

Joanne
11-24-2002, 10:09 AM
Whether I'm in beginner, intermediate, or advance? Or in-between one of these levels?

bigredlemon
11-24-2002, 12:02 PM
Im not sure about the standard in Malaysia, but the standard in the clubs i've been to is something along the lines of:


Beginner: has neither technique nor strategy conquered
High Beginner has ok technique and shot placement, and rarely returns high to mid-court

Intermediate: has great technique and shot placement, but doesn't use much strategy. Element of deception is weak or lacking.
High intermediate: has some strategy, such as suprising the opponent, wearing them out, etc.

Advanced: great technique and use of strategy: thinks one step ahead of each shot. Always knows which position to return to, etc. Great use of deception keeps opponent on their toes.

Elite: same as advanced but better all around.

Sheldon
11-24-2002, 01:32 PM
But most people at relatively competitve clubs will be high inter and advanced according to that scale i.e. our college team of 6 would have 3 advanced and 3 high inters. Is that about right? Sounds really high to me.....

LazyBuddy
11-25-2002, 12:05 PM
Originally posted by Sheldon
But most people at relatively competitve clubs will be high inter and advanced according to that scale i.e. our college team of 6 would have 3 advanced and 3 high inters. Is that about right? Sounds really high to me.....


Wow... then, ur college team should be really dominating in the league...

However, if they just happen to against worse player much more often than ppl get similar or better skill level, maybe u should consider to lower their rating.

jwu
11-25-2002, 12:33 PM
Kind of a simple formula for determining your ability but this is the way I see it:

Beginners: Need help with everything, but most importantly, need to learn proper techniques first.

Intermediates: Have learned the techniques and know the physical part of the game. Time to learn strategies and the mental part of the game.

Advance: Both physical and mental foundations of the game is set, working on a high level of consistency and perfecting gameplay.

Elite: The few who have master the game and can consistently do well in tournaments both nationally and internationally.

Sheldon
11-25-2002, 12:52 PM
That clear's that up-we're all inter nearing advanced. First League match (away) on Thursday. PS it's a sixth form college (16-18). Hope my racquet doesn't break or anything........can't play with any other racquet;-)

Loh
11-26-2002, 10:52 PM
Looks like Squash has a better grading system. Here in Singapore, players can confidently tell you "I'm a B-grader, or F-grader". It appears that those in charge have a national system to grade the players, but I haven't had time to find out how they do it. The squash national body used to organize tournaments for the various grades in the past.

It is true that in badminton, we don't have a central system to rank players. For most officially organized tournaments they normally draw a line between national players, ex-national players and others. For example, the local SBA has an annual team tournament called the Wong Peng Soon Cup (5 matches: MS, MD, Veteran MD (above 45 years, I believe), LD and XD) which excludes national players and ex-national players who last represented the country for less than 3 years (just a guess).

When we play friendly inter-club games, although we rank our own players in order of ability, the standards do differ when compared with the other opposition clubs. The 1st team of a "strong" club (lke the Chinese Swimming Club) may be far too strong for a "weaker" club, when even its 3rd team will prove quite a match. Even within one's own team, there may be stark differences in the player's standards. Over time and with more interaction and experience, such clubs will know how to arrange their teams in order to provide better and more interesting competition to avoid one-sidedness.

Over here, nationally organized tournaments for the general public are few. We do have the contituency games whereby players of a certain (geographic and electoral) district can team up to play against those from other districts. The schools are definitely more active and have their own annual national level competitions. There are also the national age-group tournaments, but hardly any for ordinary players (apart from sponsored ones) who wish to find out to which grade they belong.

I also noticed that someone from this Forum did mention about the A-Level, B-Level, etc, competitions (maybe in the UK?) and wonder how this is done?

Joanne
11-27-2002, 03:52 AM
Hmm.....how do I rate myself? lol. :D Still no idea how.

Sheldon
11-27-2002, 11:20 AM
I'll just stick to saying "I'm pretty good":)

jwu
11-27-2002, 11:24 AM
Originally posted by Sheldon
I'll just stick to saying "I'm pretty good":)

that's not a bad way to go. :D Just going to get myself in a tournament and see how that goes, right now, I probably rate myself E. :D

LazyBuddy
11-27-2002, 11:45 AM
Fine, if there's a level of "Z", I will be that one then.

StanleyC
06-09-2004, 12:54 AM
Hi all,

I've seen that you have some discussions for level of skills and ranking for players before. Iíve got a ranking scheme for amateur badminton players from one of the Chinese badminton forums. It not only uses the result of match or level of skills but also with some behaviours to determine the grading. I think we can combine 0-3 but need to extend a bit on 6-7. Does it look reasonable?



Grade 0 : never play badminton before


Grade 1: frequent play in the street and outdoor areas. No requirement to wind direction, playground, net and racket.

Grade 2 : frequent play in the street and outdoor areas. Some requirements to wind direction but not for playground, net and racket. Think themselves are pretty good and like to show off. Never watch badminton match.


Grade 3 : like to play at outdoor badminton court with net, but do not know how high the net is. Do not play during strong wind. Think themselves are pretty good and like to show off. Watch badminton matches occasionally and just feel exciting.

Grade 4: like to play at standard indoor badminton court. Know it is expensive to play badminton. Know how to grip and own their rackets. Know that racket can be purchased in a single item but not in a pair. Know that the string can be re-stretched. Always watch badminton matches at TV. Know themselves not play so well.

Grade 5 : never play outdoor. Always think about badminton during work or at school. Like smash. Start concern about equipment. With own requirements on racket, string tension, clothes and shoes. Know how bad of others but not know how bad themselves. Concern TV badminton matches and record them into tape/disc. Never miss chance for play. Can tell names of a number of famous players and equipment. Hope the children become a pro. Start addict to badminton.


Grade 6 : concern to own technique in details and expect with less mistake. Start using deception. Judge accurately the opponents strengths and weaknesses and understand why they win or lose. Start play with pro and know the good players in the local district. Have some unlike players. Know which month will have open matches.

Grade 7: always play with pro and even win occasionally. Obtain top 5 ranking within the district. For equipment, only concern shuttle, racket and string. High requirement to the playground and can feel the wind direction. Only watch real big match and can point out strengths and weaknesses of international pro.


Grade 8: obtain top 5 in the province/stateís grade matches. Always play with pro and able to win those who are in general level. Very familiar with every things in badminton field. Know the names of the best players in the country and names of coaches in each province/state. Not quite interested to obtain the souvenir or signature even from Olympic champ.

alzgodemort
06-10-2004, 05:49 PM
In my opinion, you should skip the first 3 because I do not think those come here.... maybe level 1: still plays outdoor
level 2 plays indoor and know badminton is expensive etc...

IamAbeginner
06-14-2004, 06:04 AM
What if I am a mix of, say, grade 3 and 4? What does that make me?:( I know I suck at this game, I like to play in a standard indoor badminton court(but it is expensive so I play most of my badminton games at outdoor badminton courts) and i watch badminton matches occasionally(I do not have cable television to watch those channels that show sports all day). What can I say? I am a beginner!:(

LazyBuddy
06-14-2004, 09:28 AM
I should be somewhere around 5 or 6 :rolleyes: , skill of sub 0 :( , but a heart of 8+. :D

TheGr8Two
06-14-2004, 11:33 AM
I don't believe what you do truly affects your skill level.


Think themselves are pretty good and like to show off. That isn't always the case with beginners.

But maybe I'm a beginner, even though I'm not showing off intentionally, I do challenging shots. Doesn't sound right however.


Know that the string can be re-stretched. you mean restring..i suppose?

Personally..I feel that my skill level would be at 6. However, i'm not terribly interested in videos..I was about a year ago. Now....pff...I'll come out with my own ideas.

Personally, I think behaviour does not contribute to skill level. It's not like I'll get better by watching lots of video..this is a sport; we're not studying for writing an exam! :D

prophet
06-14-2004, 01:18 PM
I agree with alzgodemort and think the grades 1-3 should be combined. There is a lower level of difference with beginner players.

Whereas the last higher levels need more of a variance. There is a world of difference between someone who has all their shots, and someone who can hang with a pro, even at the lowest level. You need more degrees of difference in between grades 5-9.

Also your grading seems dependent on playing conditions, equipment, knowing professional badminton players and information, etc. All of these are exterior factors. I would grade on more badminton factors based on skills. For example, a beginner might not use a correct forehand or backhand grip, and use strictly panhandle for all shots, with no consistency or length in their shots. Someone a step up might be able to do full clears, etc. Someone another step up might be able to do full backhand clears, etc. Just some suggestions.

I would propose a grading something like this:

grade 0= first timer
grade 1,2,3 low, mid, high beginner
grade 4,5,6 low, mid, high intermediate
grade 7,8,9 low, mid, high advance

Each grade would have skills attached to them, and moving into grade 5 and up, the player would start adding mental skills as well.

TheGr8Two
06-14-2004, 02:53 PM
I agree. I would further add:

grade 0= first timer - practice making contact with the bird
grade 1,2,3 low, mid, high beginner - learning to make consistent clears, and practicing footwork
grade 4,5,6 low, mid, high intermediate - good serves, can do clears, smashes, drops with reasonable consistency, footwork improved
grade 7,8,9 low, mid, high advance - strategy, consistent shots, with some particularly effective shots, efficient footwork.
grade 10 - beyond advanced - top players who make it to at least to the finals in local tourneys some of the time.


I agree with alzgodemort and think the grades 1-3 should be combined. There is a lower level of difference with beginner players.

Whereas the last higher levels need more of a variance. There is a world of difference between someone who has all their shots, and someone who can hang with a pro, even at the lowest level. You need more degrees of difference in between grades 5-9.

Also your grading seems dependent on playing conditions, equipment, knowing professional badminton players and information, etc. All of these are exterior factors. I would grade on more badminton factors based on skills. For example, a beginner might not use a correct forehand or backhand grip, and use strictly panhandle for all shots, with no consistency or length in their shots. Someone a step up might be able to do full clears, etc. Someone another step up might be able to do full backhand clears, etc. Just some suggestions.

I would propose a grading something like this:

grade 0= first timer
grade 1,2,3 low, mid, high beginner
grade 4,5,6 low, mid, high intermediate
grade 7,8,9 low, mid, high advance

Each grade would have skills attached to them, and moving into grade 5 and up, the player would start adding mental skills as well.

Sliced Drop
06-15-2004, 03:31 PM
I think that guide was supposed to be humorous. ;)

StanleyC
06-17-2004, 05:52 AM
I think the ranking can serve as an alternate view of the standard for amateur players. it could be humorous but it also points out some true behaviours that different standards of players may have.

of course I agree that using the skill level should be the best and ultimate way to grade a player, but it is difficult to judge what is "...good serves, can do clears, smashes, drops..." if the test is conducted by a questionnaire like this.

anyway, thanks for your comments. just for fun. :D

Furqan
07-08-2004, 02:49 PM
then i guess im intermediate....gunna be advanced soon.

chibe_K
07-08-2004, 04:12 PM
By the way, my club has a tournament lately and there is level E ??? Is A,B,C,D official IBF ratings ?

TheGr8Two
07-12-2004, 12:47 PM
I have a theoretical question..

Should a player be rated at best or at worst?

Typically, my best plays are at the middle of a session, because I would have warmed up, and yet haven't completely tired out. And it is at this point that, if I were to be playing against better players, I can hold my own, whereas before and after, I would not fare so well.

Suppose that I have played for 2.5 hours continuously and am tired out; then someone says, I'm playing at the wrong level and wants to test me..what can I say?

Ideally, I'd be playing great the whole time, but it's not something that will happen because of the way the club runs, and I don't really want to get into it.

badrad
07-12-2004, 01:10 PM
I have a theoretical question..

Should a player be rated at best or at worst?

Typically, my best plays are at the middle of a session, because I would have warmed up, and yet haven't completely tired out. And it is at this point that, if I were to be playing against better players, I can hold my own, whereas before and after, I would not fare so well.

Suppose that I have played for 2.5 hours continuously and am tired out; then someone says, I'm playing at the wrong level and wants to test me..what can I say?

Ideally, I'd be playing great the whole time, but it's not something that will happen because of the way the club runs, and I don't really want to get into it.what you stated is the same problem with nearly all tournaments. for instance, if the draw happens to be poorly drawn, you may wind up playing the "best" players against each other in the quarters or semis. having won the hard set of matches, you can't recover in time for the finals - and the weaker team beats you in the finals - well, after all that hard work, this weaker team get the title...

i guess in the case of the club situation - decline the match if you are too tired. i think your answer can be - "if this is a test, then test me at the beginning of the session when i am fresh, since that will be more indicative of my level."

JRMTL
07-12-2004, 01:15 PM
In Quebec, we have 4 levels after the junior levels: Elite, A, B or C. When you suscribe for a tournament, you choose a level. I am a B-player. So, I can try to do the B, A or Elite tournament. I wouldn't be allowed to play in the C-level.

When the season ends, the provincial federation looks at the rankings and decide who may have a promotion to the next level (C to B, B to A or A to Elite). They have finite criterias so it helps to decide (for C to B, x ratings in MS, y ratings in MD or z ratings in XD).

To answer your question, Great, I believe you should evaluate yourself when you play your first game as if you play your first game in a tournament against a seeded player.

JRMTL

TheGr8Two
07-12-2004, 01:39 PM
So the idea to avoid even matchups until the end?

Anyway..regarding the club situation..good point. Just hope that I won't be moved down for declining :D


what you stated is the same problem with nearly all tournaments. for instance, if the draw happens to be poorly drawn, you may wind up playing the "best" players against each other in the quarters or semis. having won the hard set of matches, you can't recover in time for the finals - and the weaker team beats you in the finals - well, after all that hard work, this weaker team get the title...

i guess in the case of the club situation - decline the match if you are too tired. i think your answer can be - "if this is a test, then test me at the beginning of the session when i am fresh, since that will be more indicative of my level."

TheGr8Two
07-12-2004, 01:43 PM
There is insufficient time for warmup..this is club level. So the first game won't go well for some ppl..either myself or my opponents.

Actually..I have an idea...I'll play singles for the game.


In Quebec, we have 4 levels after the junior levels: Elite, A, B or C. When you suscribe for a tournament, you choose a level. I am a B-player. So, I can try to do the B, A or Elite tournament. I wouldn't be allowed to play in the C-level.

When the season ends, the provincial federation looks at the rankings and decide who may have a promotion to the next level (C to B, B to A or A to Elite). They have finite criterias so it helps to decide (for C to B, x ratings in MS, y ratings in MD or z ratings in XD).

To answer your question, Great, I believe you should evaluate yourself when you play your first game as if you play your first game in a tournament against a seeded player.

JRMTL

Aleik
07-12-2004, 06:39 PM
I am the champion of the world until I am defeated, and the worst in the world until I win.

Ratings are are kind of cross-reference against other players you may or may not have beaten, which is why I think they are a complete waste of time.

If I were a pro, I really wouldn't be bothered about how I am compared to others. It's not worth brooding on.

carlol
07-12-2004, 10:17 PM
The easiest way to level yourselves, within your club, is to have everyone do this: rank all the players in your club except yourself. Get the results and then voila! ... your club ranking. if there are 50 of you guys, you can class the top 25% as A, and the bottom 25% as D, or however which way you want to rank it. That should give you and idea where u are with respect to your club.

When playing against strangers, we usually have a levelling session, where the unknowns play a few games and are observed, and then levelled accordingly. The problem with levelling would be that it can be easily fooled by idiots who jjust wanna win at all costs and play bad intentionally so they get a lower class/rank.

Unless there is a national or international effort to level or rank all badminton players, everything will be subjective.

david14700
09-01-2004, 09:43 AM
Going back to Lazybuddy's original question about how someone would rate themselves in this rating system, in the UK, A is supposed to be elite national level players, B are advanced players, C are club players and D beginners.

Realistically, D are players who've been playing a year or two, the majority of club members are C players. There are C-, C and C+ and you can tell the difference when you watch the different levels. C and C+ at the club I used to go to had matches against other clubs but C- didn't.

B players are much stronger players, and most have been playing since they were young and have had coaching and match play throughout high school and university.

There are casual sessions where you can play with people in different levels, and I've noticed C players sometimes have weak backhands, they can't clear from end to end with a high backhand. But B players all have decent backhand smashes, drives and clears. They're also much sharper at net kills.

Many of the B+ players are qualified coaches and you can't really tell them apart from the A players just by watching them play. Their techniques look flawless, but they tend to be older (and usually a bit fatter too because the A players are usually in their early twenties and very fit).

I would guess most of the serious players on this forum would be B or B+ players, with a few A- for those who play for national junior teams.

Troncheur
09-15-2004, 04:56 AM
In France we have ratings and dynamic evolution for each player and in each category. The ratings are using same letters A, B, C, D, E and now F. But to replace A+ or B-, there are numbers : A1, A2, ...., E1, E2, F1, F2 and Non Rated people.

To fit international rankings, the A category has more numbers. A-4 and A-3 are for top international players (TOP 30), A-2 and A-1 for followinf international players.

In summary :
A-4 to A-1 : international level
A0, A1, A2 : national level
B1, B2 : national and regional level
C1, C2 : regional and department level
D1, D2 : department level
E1, E2 : local level
F1, F2 : competitors
Non Rated : beginners

Actually, any french player has 3 ratings. For instance, i'm C2/C2/D1 (Single/Double/Mixt).

If u wanna see how it works, french site is quite well done : www.ffba.net

Troncheur
09-15-2004, 04:59 AM
And, based on this rankings, the players play in their category. For instance, i play in C category in single and double and D category in mixt.

Indeed, a classic french tournament is done for A, B, C and D categories (example) and in each u can play MS, WS, MD, WD and XD.

It's nearly the same in belgium.

LazyBuddy
09-15-2004, 12:13 PM
C1, C2 : regional and department level
D1, D2 : department level
E1, E2 : local level
F1, F2 : competitors


Can you explain what's the difference between department, local and competitor level??? :eek:

Troncheur
09-16-2004, 02:17 AM
Actually, France (65M inhabitants and 100000 bad players) is administratively divided into 22 regions and 95 departments.

When i talk about regional, department, local levels, it means good level in those areas. Local level would be under department (with 1 or 2 years of badminton behind).

The new category F (F1 and F2) has been created this year to allow beginners not to be automaticly fired at 1st round in tournaments. Once u win 3 or 4 matches in tournaments, u go rated F2 so the tournaments for non rated people are real ones.

Many debates about this in french bad microcosm about this new feature. Some say it won't change anything, only move the pb.
Some say it will force more players to play with feather (much more expensive than plastic ones used in non rated compets).
Some say there's a movement of global french ratings to increase more and more and we would have to control this....

Too many A and B players for me, we should have a fixed number of A players like in tennis table or tennis...

Jaguar
09-24-2004, 08:14 AM
There are tournaments for A,B,C and D drop flights. It means everyone
start out with A flight, if you win the first 2 matches then you'll stay in A.
- Win 1st match, loose 2nd go to B
- Loose 1st match, loose 2nd go to C.
In C, if you loose the 1st match go to D





I have seen ppl talking about "level B, level A, level C, etc" for player (not elite, just regular club members) rating. However, I have no idea how this rating works. Just wonder, how to rate myself? Is there a certain standard to follow? Or, just purely "self feeling"?

LazyBuddy
09-24-2004, 12:52 PM
There are tournaments for A,B,C and D drop flights. It means everyone
start out with A flight, if you win the first 2 matches then you'll stay in A.
- Win 1st match, loose 2nd go to B
- Loose 1st match, loose 2nd go to C.
In C, if you loose the 1st match go to D

There are also alternative ways:

1. Higher group starts with A, and lower group starts with C.

2. Winner stays in the group, and once being defeated, lower 1 level. Therefore, if in higher group, the lowest you can go is B. If C, the best you can do is win C.

tour_prof
08-03-2005, 03:45 AM
Good day Shuttlers!

I do not know if it fortunate or unfortunate that for competitions in the Philippines, most clubs 'level' the players and it seems that it is really unscientific and prone to misjudgements. There is NO CLEAR CUT rule in 'levelling' and in some cases, my friends who get to join competitions are sometimes 'mis-levelled' by levelling committees. At times, the organizers who favour some players grant lower levels to those favoured thus instead of these seasoned players getting a level A or B are granted levels one notch lower.

I have asked on a local forum how they do the levelling (particularly the SOTX organizers in Manila)but they cannot seem to provide a direct and candid answer. Unlike golf where you are rated based on historical data (handicap),badminton players do not document their last level (thats handicap, in golf) thus irregularity is tolerated.

How is this guys?

pengu1ns
08-03-2005, 05:38 AM
Does it not seem a bit wooden, using clear cut ratings to assess someones talent?
I mean if i was using LIPlayers definitions i would probably be around a C although i have never played in a tournament because there arent any but im better then beginners at D. However, someone who has played in some kind of tournament is automatically a grade higher than me? Regardless of actual skill?

A friend of mine is a fair bit better than me and hes been playing a lot longer, yet using that grading he would also be a C. This presents a problem.
If you're going to use ratings they should either be more vague to emcompass more factors or much more detailed, by which time the whole thing becomes rather irrelevant.

tour_prof
08-03-2005, 05:46 AM
Wooden in what sense sir?

Id like to think that more than talents, these are skills that you learn overtime...

Just an opinion..

cappy75
08-03-2005, 06:10 AM
Ratings do fluctuate and for players to at least maintain their true ratings, they should either stay competitive or keep training. If a former competitive amateur hasn't touched a shuttle in more than 5 years, he wouldn't have been much better than non-competitive recreational players. I wouldn't worry about having lower ratings than a comparable less skilled 'tournament' player. Playing conditions are very different in tournaments than club plays. Even in supposedly 'fun' friendly tournaments, there's pressure to perform. Shots we normally don't screw up gets screwed up due to other factors than our skills. For this alone, I value tournament experience more than having comparable skills.

If you're serious about rating yourself, play in tournaments and earn your rank. Otherwise, it's a waste of time rating yourselves based on subjective speculations. IMO, all non-newb players are intermediate and should only be considered advance when they have at least considerable exposure to competitive amateur tournaments. That's just for the general population. Comparing to the pros, we're all newbies:( .


Does it not seem a bit wooden, using clear cut ratings to assess someones talent?
I mean if i was using LIPlayers definitions i would probably be around a C although i have never played in a tournament because there arent any but im better then beginners at D. However, someone who has played in some kind of tournament is automatically a grade higher than me? Regardless of actual skill?

A friend of mine is a fair bit better than me and hes been playing a lot longer, yet using that grading he would also be a C. This presents a problem.
If you're going to use ratings they should either be more vague to emcompass more factors or much more detailed, by which time the whole thing becomes rather irrelevant.

Eurasian =--(O)
08-03-2005, 01:27 PM
Obviously you rate yourself in comparison to your competition.

pengu1ns
08-04-2005, 02:05 PM
Wooden in what sense sir?

Id like to think that more than talents, these are skills that you learn overtime...

Just an opinion..
Wooden in the sense that they are inflexible and therfore not very effective as a measure, due to the reasons above. Btw you are correct, i just said talent because it was the first word i thought of :p

fpixi
08-06-2005, 10:05 AM
In Denmark we have got 6 different levels: E=elite, M=master, and then A, B, C, D.

Elite is the best, D is the worst. You need points to move from level to level, you can accive points by going to the quaterfinals or more in tournements, and there are different amounts of points depending how many players playing in the tournement.

Hope it was any help...

Bye the way, I plays "B" level :o

tour_prof
08-08-2005, 11:28 PM
You must be very good! Maybe you can help me out by sending me literature on how you guys really rate yourselves. Im trying to institue reforms in our group (South Manila Badminton) here in the Philippines.

my mail - amlacuna@gmail.com

regards!



Aris:)






In Denmark we have got 6 different levels: E=elite, M=master, and then A, B, C, D.

Elite is the best, D is the worst. You need points to move from level to level, you can accive points by going to the quaterfinals or more in tournements, and there are different amounts of points depending how many players playing in the tournement.

Hope it was any help...

Bye the way, I plays "B" level :o

jerby
10-24-2005, 12:50 PM
hi there,

I've seen a lot of people here calling themselves one of these. i sorta figured i'm intermediate.

but is there any rule to determine it?

Looking in my club (200 people) out of the 200 only 20 can beat me, but a lot of them are recreational. I can't keep up with holland national selection..but htis all doesn't really correspond with any rating i could give here..

can anybody just name some stuff an intermediate should be able to do, and a beginner doesn't (and visa-versa intermediate-advanced)


the reason behind this is that i saw somebody write he thinks the ns8k is more for intermediate-advanced..but i find it playing terrifyingly nice....i can do everything i did with my at500 and better...

DinkAlot
10-24-2005, 01:05 PM
It's all relative. I say don't worry about titles, designations, rankings and just have fun. :)

Everyone has a different feel for rackets, different preferences. For instance, an "A" Player at SGVBC only plays with only 4U flexible rackets because he says he cannot move nor flex heavy, stiff rackets. Yet he has among the strongest wrists I've seen this side of pros. He said when 5Us are readily available, he'll get a 5U.

In contrast, there's a beginner I know who uses U/2U rackets and those rackets feel light to him; he can clear/drive with the heavier rackets no problem.

So again, it's all relative. :p

jerby
10-24-2005, 01:08 PM
well yes..of course...

but it would make discussing stuff on teh forums here a lot easier...

ctjcad
10-24-2005, 01:14 PM
Dan, just wondering, who could that "A" player be??...Trisna??.. :p :rolleyes:


It's all relative. I say don't worry about titles, designations, rankings and just have fun. :)

Everyone has a different feel for rackets, different preferences. For instance, an "A" Player at SGVBC only plays with only 4U flexible rackets because he says he cannot move nor flex heavy, stiff rackets. Yet he has among the strongest wrists I've seen this side of pros. He said when 5Us are readily available, he'll get a 5U.

In contrast, there's a beginner I know who uses U/2U rackets and those rackets feel light to him; he can clear/drive with the heavier rackets no problem.

So again, it's all relative. :p

DinkAlot
10-24-2005, 01:53 PM
well yes..of course...

but it would make discussing stuff on teh forums here a lot easier...
Actually no, it would be more difficult because it's all relative.

For instance, a typical "club" player at SGVBC is going to be better than 80-90% of all the players at other local gyms. The SGVBC club player would be considered advanced by those local gym players while they would be only average at SGVBC.

A strong "B" player from SGVBC could go to OCBC and play with the U.S. National Team and would be the weakest link.

So we would need some sort of common reference which is tough.

After some thought, I'd say roughly, we can break it down into something like this: beginner, intermediate, advanced.

Beginner: doesn't have a mastery of all the basic shots. Inconsistent. You can beat these people by just keeping the shuttle in play and they will eventually commit errors and beat themselves.

Between Beginner and Intermediate: These are "D" players.

Intermediate: has a mastery of all the basic and some advanced shots. Relatively consistent. To beat an Intermediate, you have to work to win the point, no freebies. These are "C" players.

Between Intermediate and Advanced. These are "B" Players.

Advanced: has a mastery of all the shots. Very consistent. These are "A" Players.

DinkAlot
10-24-2005, 01:56 PM
Dan, just wondering, who could that "A" player be??...Trisna??.. :p :rolleyes:

Trisna is currently using a 3U RSL Millenium X-1. This a medium-stiff to stiff racket and it is a more balanced racket.

So, nope, not Trisna. :p

jerby
10-24-2005, 01:59 PM
what would you grade yourself then? why?

we do have soem abcd-tournaments here..funny how that corresponds..

DinkAlot
10-24-2005, 02:06 PM
what would you grade yourself then? why?

we do have soem abcd-tournaments here..funny how that corresponds..

I don't rate myself. :p I just play and have fun. :D

jerby
10-24-2005, 02:08 PM
I don't rate myself. :p I just play and have fun. :D
who are you fooling here?:D

cooler
10-24-2005, 02:32 PM
who are you fooling here?:D

you're an ocean away, fooling is not unpossible :)

check here http://www.badmintoncentral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=7876&page=1&pp=10&highlight=B-

although i havent talk about it here, i use the following ranking for myself

Pro
Elite
A+
A
A-
B+
B
B-
C+
C
C-
D+
D
D-
E+
E
E-
F

kwun
10-24-2005, 02:40 PM
imho. the rating is so vague, it can only be used as a general guide. to be honest, if i look at myself, my performance vary from day to day between lower and upper intermediate. it will be difficult to tell others what kind of player i am. not to say trying to compare myself with other players.

DinkAlot
10-24-2005, 02:45 PM
you're an ocean away, fooling is not unpossible :)

Yep, fooling is definitely unpossible. :p

ctjcad
10-24-2005, 03:19 PM
Oops forgot about his racket...
Hmm, on that note, since you said the gender is a "he" and an "A" player, then my next guess is either James Huang or your master-teacher Mr. Alex Liang..?!?!?!..no??..tell me it's either one of them..hehe.:p ;)

Hmm, and on the "beginner"(i know you are better than that, just using your words) side, hmm, could that player be....................you(since you are using 2u Ti-10s)?!?!hehe..;):p :)


Trisna is currently using a 3U RSL Millenium X-1. This a medium-stiff to stiff racket and it is a more balanced racket.

So, nope, not Trisna. :p

Tsumaranai
04-10-2006, 11:39 PM
What exactly defines the level of play, like what is asked in the public profile. Is it a letter grade system, where A is very experienced and such? Just wondering, because I've just been assuming this. Is there any special specification for the categories?

eguitarcoolboy
04-10-2006, 11:50 PM
Hi there, i think what we are using to catergorise the level of play would be Beginner, Intermediate and Advance instead of Letter grade system like you said. Not sure though, and thats just my own understanding of the phrase.

Tsumaranai
04-10-2006, 11:59 PM
Yea, that's what I used, but the more experienced posters/players here use letters, so I'm kinda in the haze on this.

DonnyGan
04-01-2009, 12:01 AM
i thought i was a low intermediate until i played with a high intermediate last weekend. I was revoke back to beginner. :D

then i played with my regular mates & felt like a high beginner again. i think it builds up slowly.

mrezat
04-13-2009, 12:37 PM
My Opinion.

Beginner Level- Doesnt have a proper footwork, Weak clear, weak smash, couldnt do a proper backhand clear (often clear only half court), slow movement because no proper footwork.

Intermediate Level- Have a decent footwork, decent smash, decent clear (often clear to baseline), decent backhand, decent wrist skill, fast movement.

Advance Level - A very good footwork, very fast in movement, a very good wrist skill and deception, can do all clear properly (even can do backhand clear from end corner to baseline end corner of court) and i think u will know he is at the advance level when u heard their smashes or any regular shot with that kapowwww!!! crispy sound.

Pro level - International players of coz.

RacketlonCanada
04-13-2009, 07:31 PM
Here is my own personal how I rank badminton players when I give badminton lessons, it's ABCDE, and I divided the game in four aspects

Unfortunately, it's in french, if someone wants to translate the page 2, I'm too lazy :)

http://carrefourmultisports.com/pages/pdf/inscription_badminton-a08.pdf

Danstevens
04-14-2009, 04:34 AM
i thought i was a low intermediate until i played with a high intermediate last weekend. I was revoke back to beginner. :D

then i played with my regular mates & felt like a high beginner again. i think it builds up slowly.

Don't bump threads more than a few months old, it's really getting quite annoying now - we have lots of recent threads about skill levels and ratings.

chewablemorphin
04-14-2009, 12:35 PM
i think it goes something like this:
beginner: sucky
Intermediate: not entirely sucky
Advanced: Among the best in your community
Pro: Pro

brady6
04-16-2009, 12:00 AM
uhhh i'd call a weak player a beginner. an okay player a novice and intermediates guys who give me games like 21-13/14. i'd consider myself advanced in my area since I'm probably in the top 10 or so in the province my age, or from what i've seen at high school singles in provincials so it's tough to say, probably lower.

hwidagdo
04-16-2009, 01:11 AM
Don't bump threads more than a few months old, it's really getting quite annoying now - we have lots of recent threads about skill levels and ratings.

arent there any ways to locking up the old threads? because i saw many complaining about reviving old threads.

drifit
04-16-2009, 01:33 AM
Don't bump threads more than a few months old, it's really getting quite annoying now - we have lots of recent threads about skill levels and ratings.


arent there any ways to locking up the old threads? because i saw many complaining about reviving old threads.
creating new threads that same with old threads are not welcome too.
repetitive titles are quite annoying too. :(
new members are best to browse through existing threads that they may want to ask some questions. rather than just create new threads just to ask same questions that might exist or just to ask simple questions.

chewablemorphin
04-16-2009, 09:36 AM
arent there any ways to locking up the old threads? because i saw many complaining about reviving old threads.

Hahaha, people are bumping old threads? poor you. Those bastards making you to scroll down a page to look at a new thread? they should be shot for imposing such a burden on your life.

AerotusX
06-17-2009, 04:05 PM
I was wondering, let's take a High School Varsity player and he was the #1 champion player in his league. What level would he be in the real world?

chewablemorphin
06-17-2009, 06:59 PM
I was wondering, let's take a High School Varsity player and he was the #1 champion player in his league. What level would he be in the real world?
Nothing much, highschool generally is very low level competition.

AerotusX
06-17-2009, 07:09 PM
So even in a D-level competition in the US, would this level be too tough for top high school players?

chewablemorphin
06-17-2009, 08:33 PM
So even in a D-level competition in the US, would this level be too tough for top high school players?

I'm not familiar with US competitions, but as a general rule, not always, highschool players are at a fairly low level of competition.

bradmyster
06-17-2009, 08:41 PM
D grade is not difficult mate. For younger kids it is a good competitive style but for older fellow/highschoolers D grade shouldnt be too hard. Its a great start for getting into competition.

At the moment im at High end A grade pushing for Open grade. Then hoping to break into the international level if i start training really hard. Hopefully within the next couple of years :)

Athelete1234
06-17-2009, 09:08 PM
I was wondering, let's take a High School Varsity player and he was the #1 champion player in his league. What level would he be in the real world?
It depends on which high school region. For example, in my area, tons of badminton players + clubs, not to mention they're all clustered in one area. So the level of badminton here around my school is higher than the level farther north in another region where there isn't as much involvement in the sport. Also, in China, high school champ will probably be much better than one in USA, right?

gamepurpose
06-18-2009, 12:14 AM
1st to reply the thread
beginner: just hitting the bird back and forth, try to make it over
inter: know where to hit the bird, know the strategy
advance: metality of the game, better power than inter, fast pace game
elite: same as advance but simply just every shots are more accurate. 5 to 10 mistakes per game is the max
SUPER: god mode hahaha, no i consider super as my on category only, which like elite is world class players but only players with their on unique style consider as super and has to be top 10. Or consider top 2 and 1 in world rank is super. anyone under 1 and 2 must have their unique style at least to make people see or remember that's them. (but again must not under top 10 ranking.
example: taufik? crazy backhand smash
lcw, good def quick
lin dan, overall well balance, great fitness
peter gade, trick shots
2nd personal view on histories thread
I personally think not allow duplicate the thread or post watever u want to call it, is kinda like not cool
Because obviously most people like to get the quick answers
oh hey i got a question answer this, rather than umm let see search...
oh here it is let's read this
omg it's about 247 replies, wtsdfk@sdf
So then start reading?
I know you guys going to say skip the pages stupid. But what happen if some information in the middle of the thread is pretty useful and all suddenly in the end of the post pretty much lame, head into another subject for the arguement. Wow I think that takes a long time just to get the answer.
i would recommend to have interesting stuffs or basic stuffs be so called sticky i suppose. And other than that dude let it free. If there's too much to storage in the server or i dont know all the information where the admin stored them but delete the old once. I don't think the OLD MEMBERS would cares to reply another same answer. And if we don't allow to duplicate the same issue then there I would say there shouldn't be different issue to ask by now, because through out how many years? omg too long, i'm pretty sure all questions have already been asked. So lets say that time hasn't come yet, but wat about 3 months from now or whenever? The forum going to be completely quite?,
"oh yea dude, I want to be active in this forum, buttttt..... there's nothing to talk about... I don't want to dig up old thread and start reading 'em and comment something... oh forget it"
u know that might just happen
So I personally think just let the people ask watever they want, if they ask something just too often in the forum then just refer them to the sticky. And of course don't put too much sticky. Not on every subject, that just going to kill the forum too.
More people talk the more members. People come across the forum and see wow, this forum pretty active, let's see replies 1 min ago 2 min ago 5 min ago.
And i think the more people talk about badminton the more they will play. And the more they play the better chance of badminton gets more popular. Because in USA as most of you know it is a same, in usa we think badminton sucks (when i use we here because i live in america, not that i think badminton suck, I LOVE badminton) sad enough that HOLLYWOOD UNIVERSAL insults badminton as a boring sport for their commercial. Kids rather go hollywood universal than playing badminton...

chewablemorphin
06-18-2009, 08:45 AM
Gamepurpouse that is a very badly structured wall of text, I stopped reading after the fourth line.

bradmyster
06-18-2009, 06:01 PM
Gamepurpouse that is a very badly structured wall of text, I stopped reading after the fourth line.

hhaa same lol.....after scrolling too see if it tidyd up at all...i found it didnt and gave up.

Reading that would take a few years off my eyesight! haha

chewablemorphin
06-18-2009, 07:53 PM
hhaa same lol.....after scrolling too see if it tidyd up at all...i found it didnt and gave up.

Reading that would take a few years off my eyesight! haha

A few years off my lifetime anyways.

vorxaw
06-25-2009, 03:01 PM
i guess the level is really dependent on the location of the tournament.

if there is one absolute level, then if one go to some location with low level of skills (like the US. :) ) then there will be no one playing level A.

thus i think the level really varies. and in most places, they are some like taking the whole badminton population, and then do a even distribution, 25% A, 25% b, etc.

case in point. i usually play level B/C in the N. Cali area. i was told that the level is higher in S. Cal, and i was also told that if i play a tourney in Hongkong, i will be playing level E.... so there. :)

ya this is very true, I have a bunch of friends that quit training after having success at the national level in canada simply because there is very little chance in competing internationally, the overall level here is way too low

so when playing national players recreationally, if...

you feel like youre actually playing badminton, but getting completely raped (youre advanced)
you feel like youre simply having a heart attack in a large green hospital (intermediate)
you feel fine, youre opponent is such a nice guy (beginner/intermediate me:p)

flyingfox
06-26-2009, 12:20 AM
1st to reply the thread
beginner: just hitting the bird back and forth, try to make it over
inter: know where to hit the bird, know the strategy
advance: metality of the game, better power than inter, fast pace game
elite: same as advance but simply just every shots are more accurate. 5 to 10 mistakes per game is the max
SUPER: god mode hahaha, no i consider super as my on category only, which like elite is world class players but only players with their on unique style consider as super and has to be top 10. Or consider top 2 and 1 in world rank is super. anyone under 1 and 2 must have their unique style at least to make people see or remember that's them. (but again must not under top 10 ranking.
example: taufik? crazy backhand smash
lcw, good def quick
lin dan, overall well balance, great fitness
peter gade, trick shots
2nd personal view on histories thread
I personally think not allow duplicate the thread or post watever u want to call it, is kinda like not cool
Because obviously most people like to get the quick answers
oh hey i got a question answer this, rather than umm let see search...
oh here it is let's read this
omg it's about 247 replies, wtsdfk@sdf
So then start reading?
I know you guys going to say skip the pages stupid. But what happen if some information in the middle of the thread is pretty useful and all suddenly in the end of the post pretty much lame, head into another subject for the arguement. Wow I think that takes a long time just to get the answer.
i would recommend to have interesting stuffs or basic stuffs be so called sticky i suppose. And other than that dude let it free. If there's too much to storage in the server or i dont know all the information where the admin stored them but delete the old once. I don't think the OLD MEMBERS would cares to reply another same answer. And if we don't allow to duplicate the same issue then there I would say there shouldn't be different issue to ask by now, because through out how many years? omg too long, i'm pretty sure all questions have already been asked. So lets say that time hasn't come yet, but wat about 3 months from now or whenever? The forum going to be completely quite?,
"oh yea dude, I want to be active in this forum, buttttt..... there's nothing to talk about... I don't want to dig up old thread and start reading 'em and comment something... oh forget it"
u know that might just happen
So I personally think just let the people ask watever they want, if they ask something just too often in the forum then just refer them to the sticky. And of course don't put too much sticky. Not on every subject, that just going to kill the forum too.
More people talk the more members. People come across the forum and see wow, this forum pretty active, let's see replies 1 min ago 2 min ago 5 min ago.
And i think the more people talk about badminton the more they will play. And the more they play the better chance of badminton gets more popular. Because in USA as most of you know it is a same, in usa we think badminton sucks (when i use we here because i live in america, not that i think badminton suck, I LOVE badminton) sad enough that HOLLYWOOD UNIVERSAL insults badminton as a boring sport for their commercial. Kids rather go hollywood universal than playing badminton...

well said!!! :D

soccerking888
04-10-2013, 10:04 PM
Hi all,

I've tried searching but not able to find threads as the topic. I just wish to know how do we actually measure or rate the level of play for normal badminton players (not on the professional or national circuit)? Or is there even anyway we are able to do that? :confused:

latecomer
04-11-2013, 12:55 AM
Let have some fun on this topic. There are 2 keys. 1st one is back hand. 2nd is people reaction. If your back hand return is weak, you are forever a beginner. If you can do back hand drop, you are at intermediate level. If you can do back hand clear from baseline to baseline clear, you are intermediate plus. If you can do back hand smack, you can beat 90% of the players. The fun part is people reacting to you on court. If everybody want to play with you, then you are the best in this particular club. If most players want to play with you, then you are at intermediate level. If only a few people want to play with you, then beginner is your label. If everybody leaves as soon as you step on court, you better bring your mother with you.

bowi12
05-08-2013, 08:44 AM
If everybody leaves as soon as you step on court, you need to buy some deodorant.

Henzington
06-08-2013, 01:51 PM
I rate players on:

how fast and agile they are; this includes footwork
how clean their shots are; meaning a clear should better fall damn near to the baseline or a dropshot should have the right speed and target point.

rayvinly
06-09-2013, 03:43 AM
I think this is relative to other players in your club. You can be a beginner in one club and an intermediate in another. I always do an overhead on my backhand side, so I never really learn to hit a backhand. But I improve in other areas of my game, so other players want to play with me. I found what happens rather is that people who know one another well tend to stick with playing together because they are usually at similar levels.

DRead
06-19-2013, 03:03 AM
It's difficult to quantify - and as rayvinly said it'll depend on the club. Where I play has a system with 5 grades, and the club pro/coaches use a set of criteria to determine who will fall into which grade.

I think the key areas to look for are:

Consistency
Footwork
Positioning
Tactics/Controlling the game
Cleanliness of technique and shot quality


With each area being improved upon equally as one advances. At higher levels things like deception, power and athleticism become more important.

But more importantly, shoes and racquets - the more money spent on these, the better the player (obviously!) :D

Chandra Phuyal
06-19-2013, 08:28 AM
We have to look the performance of the players is that good or bad.If they are playing nervousily then we have to know they are not playing properly or worse. From this type of feelings we can measure the Level mof play.

Tadashi
06-22-2013, 08:58 PM
It highly depends on what you mean by "measuring."

If you want to select a team for competition, and future potential, then there are tons of test indicators you can use to judge the quality of a player. How fast can you run the four corners, for example, or what is your heart rate after three minutes of stepping up a ladder, and many other things.

Problem, of course, it takes a lot of effort to get these info, hence testing. A popular but scientifically completely invalid shortcut: smash speed, the faster, the better - simple, eh?

If you want to judge a player's level of play by hindsight, say, watching him on video, or live on court, you already can draw distinctions just by stature and physical look.

Lower legs and forearm muscles tell a lot. If you can see NO prominent muscles there, the player may not be too difficult. If you can see prominent muscles there, indeed, there are two types. Either, it is a body builder for sake of body building, then he may lack the training for speeding up his nerves and coordination - hence powerful but lazy and slow; or he truly is a quite threatening player of fast power-up ability. Tall players have a natural advantage, but they seldom jump and their jump abilites are quite weak. Skinny players are extremely enduring just by the nature of muscle-body relation.

And then there are tacticals ... too many ways, don't a simple shortcut to it.

Final point, Lee Chong Wei can do benchpressing with heavy weights similar to other players but 130 ranks below him! So, fitness is a must, but not a sufficient criteria, too.

ya4dang1
09-08-2013, 10:34 PM
Rating anyone's play is a matter of personal judgement usually done in comparision with some already ranked players. Rating is not a science but an art (Ranking may be science that usually based on tournament results). Rating may differ from person to person and may be totally wrong sometime. Many people have tendency to rank themself higher then they actually are. Many tournaments only have A and B levels. Trust me, if you are an "A" level player then you should already know by now. Nobody becomes A level player in vaccum.

The way I look ranking is as follows:

Pros: Full time Badminton player who plays international tournaments.

A+: Player who qualifies to play IBF ranking tournament where some Top world ranking players are also playing.

A : Player who qualifies to play nationally rank tournaments and have good chances to get to Quater Final or highers.

A-:Who is good enough to play in nationally ranked tournaments and also good enough to get to second or third rounds but not good enough to get to QF.

B : Players who plays nationally rank tournaments lose in their first round and then do good in consolation tournament.

B- : Do bad in consolation but good enough to look good in playing badminton.

C: Who can hold some rallies once in a while. May become partner to play doubles with B level. Participates local tournaments (non ranking) but don't get anywhere except having fun.

D: Beginnners: Those who enjoy playing but needs to work on almost everything.

I hope above helps.

I get a "C" in Malaysia :eek:

amleto
09-09-2013, 06:56 AM
I'm glad you saw fit to reply to a 4-year old thread just for that.

sautom88
09-09-2013, 07:09 AM
I get a "C" in Malaysia :eek:

I am worse, not even qualify because never join local tournaments. I am not even a "C" level in Indonesia.

Cheung
09-26-2014, 06:24 PM
I merged a couple of threads into this one

Probably the best answer was this one from Mag. :)

Intermediate is when you learn the secret handshake.

Advanced is when you stop worrying about questions like the one you asked.


Anyhow, the reason for bringing up this thread was a recent experience. I get some people emailing me for games occasionally and they would give an answer of intermediate - advanced etc. Because court space is pretty tight in HK, it's better to have a more accurate idea.

So, I would ask for information such as league experience and tournaments experience in the person's own country. It gives a better idea of the non-social level. And interestingly, the last couple of people have failed to reply. :)

I got a bit embarrassed by one girl a number of years ago. She said she was advanced level. So, I thought that would fit into my group of competition experienced players. Thought it would be quite exciting to see a new player. Oh wow, was I embarrassed or was I embarrassed. Turns out she is willing to run around court but doesn't have an idea of footwork or proper techniques. All my group were asking me "I thought you said she was good....". All I could say was "That was what she told me.. :("

|_Footwork_|
09-29-2014, 01:28 AM
The problem is: You can't define it in a way that is understood by everyone in the same way.
Even if you prescribe very precisely, some beginners will say/think: "Yeah, I can play a clear to the baseline, I can play tight drops, my smash is lethal and my drive lightening fast."
In reality they play only with other beginners/bad players and get this wrong impresiion by simply being the best of their rather bad group
(in Germany there's a saying: " the one-eyed is the king in a group of blind people...")

You can never define things properly, as level of play is always relative, there is no gold standard like in running or so...

amleto
09-29-2014, 06:17 AM
162482
...............

frederic
10-03-2014, 12:10 AM
I think that the levels of playing may be categorized into three levels, they are the entry level, intermediate level and the expert level. Here, each individual share their individual opinion about level of players. So, I am including my opinion.

Cheung
10-03-2014, 01:46 AM
The problem is: You can't define it in a way that is understood by everyone in the same way.
Even if you prescribe very precisely, some beginners will say/think: "Yeah, I can play a clear to the baseline, I can play tight drops, my smash is lethal and my drive lightening fast."
In reality they play only with other beginners/bad players and get this wrong impresiion by simply being the best of their rather bad group
(in Germany there's a saying: " the one-eyed is the king in a group of blind people...")

You can never define things properly, as level of play is always relative, there is no gold standard like in running or so...
Agree. Hence, I now ask for competition and league match experience to judge. It's a better discriminatory question to gauge people's standard without actually having seen them.

I haven't met any German players yet.:)

kaki!
10-03-2014, 05:30 PM
I merged a couple of threads into this one

Probably the best answer was this one from Mag. :)



Anyhow, the reason for bringing up this thread was a recent experience. I get some people emailing me for games occasionally and they would give an answer of intermediate - advanced etc. Because court space is pretty tight in HK, it's better to have a more accurate idea.

So, I would ask for information such as league experience and tournaments experience in the person's own country. It gives a better idea of the non-social level. And interestingly, the last couple of people have failed to reply. :)

I got a bit embarrassed by one girl a number of years ago. She said she was advanced level. So, I thought that would fit into my group of competition experienced players. Thought it would be quite exciting to see a new player. Oh wow, was I embarrassed or was I embarrassed. Turns out she is willing to run around court but doesn't have an idea of footwork or proper techniques. All my group were asking me "I thought you said she was good....". All I could say was "That was what she told me.. :("

Met a lady who said something similar. Turned out she meant advanced beginner, and in reality she wasn't even that :-S

Cheung
10-03-2014, 06:07 PM
Met a lady who said something similar. Turned out she meant advanced beginner, and in reality she wasn't even that :-S

Had a recent case where a lady was thinking of referring her friend to me as this friend was "quite good in her group". A few pertinant questions on competition experience gave a bit more food for thought.