View Full Version : News Articles on Beijing Olympics 2008



george@chongwei
06-16-2008, 11:59 PM
as usual, u can post any news on this OG08 here..if its not in english, pls translate the article:):cool:

george@chongwei
06-17-2008, 12:00 AM
let me start 1st:)

Kien Keat now plays it cautious after freak accident

KUALA LUMPUR: Doubles shuttler Koo Kien Keat felt as good as new when he resumed training in Bukit Jalil yesterday.
He has recovered from cuts and bruises suffered in a freak accident 12 days ago and he will now be treading with caution in the run-up to the Beijing Olympics in August.
After a morning workout yesterday, Kien Keat had all the stitches on his hands removed in the afternoon.
“I went for jogging and did a workout at the gymnasium. I feel good and everything will be all right. By next week, I should be able to train together with my partner (Tan Boon Heong),” said Kien Keat, who suffered the injuries when the glass panel he was leaning on gave way at the Bukit Jalil Sports Complex.
“I removed the six stitches on my leg on Friday. Today, all the 20 stitches on my hands are gone.”
Kien Keat, however, said that the scars on his hand and leg would remind him to be extra cautious ahead of the Beijing Games.
“I have the phobia of glass now. No I am certainly not getting near them,” he said in a jest.
“Seriously, the scars are a reminder for me. I do not want to go through the same experience again. I know, I have created some anxiety. Now I am all focused to get back on top form for the Games.”
Kien Keat-Boon Heong are one of the two Malaysian men's pairs for the Olympics.
The other pair are veterans Choong Tan Fook-Lee Wan Wah.

george@chongwei
06-21-2008, 10:19 AM
congratulations Uganda and Zambia:):):)

dwin Ekirin from Uganda and Elly Mambwe from Zambia were given tripartite wild cards to participate in the upcoming Olympics, competing in Badminton, reported the Chinese News Agency Xinhua today.

"We are pleased that our efforts have been answered with Ekiring 's performance. His progress has been successful. We thank all those who have played part in making him achieve this, most especially the Olympic Solidarity," said Uganda Olympic Committee president Francis Nyangweso, quoted by loca newspaper New Vision on Thursday

george@chongwei
06-23-2008, 12:49 PM
http://www.badzine.info/index2.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=1134&Itemid=42&pop=1&page=0

george@chongwei
06-24-2008, 12:22 AM
Lack of quality so Rexy forced to spar with Olympic players

KUALA LUMPUR: The Olympic-bound doubles players are faced with a lack of quality sparring.
And coach Rexy Mainaky attributed it to the lack of professionalism showed by the sparring partners in the national team.
“I find this quite common among Malaysian players used for sparring sessions. They do not give their best. They would rather kill each other than helping one another,” he said. “They fail to realise that if they go all out, they will also benefit. Playing against the country’s top players is one of the best ways to improve their game. The sparring partners play well in the early stages of a drill but they dish out poor quality in the later stages. They should give full commitment and not play half-heartedly.”
For an immediate solution to the problem, Rexy has become one of the sparring partners for the Olympic-bound players.
“I am at wits’ end to find a way to inspire the sparring partners. For now, I have decided to play with the boys. At least, I feel satisfied with the quality they will receive in the sparring sessions,” said Rexy.
Currently, the BA of Malaysia (BAM) pay a full-time sparring partner RM2,000 a month.

eaglehelang
07-09-2008, 05:26 AM
This is the Pysio that some of you have seen on tv in TC Finals : Sandra Fiedler

http://www.bharian.com.my/Wednesday/Sukan/20080708230433/mainpix
PASTIKAN SEMPURNA: Eei Hui (kanan) diperiksa oleh fisioterapi Sandra Fiedler selepas latihan di Stadium Juara, Bukit Kiara.
(CEH being checked by physiotherapist Sandra Fiedler after training in Stadium Juara)

http://www.bharian.com.my/Current_News/BH/Wednesday/Sukan/20080708230433/Article/

THe article is intv with WPT & CEH, Msia WD pair to OG.
They said with the 2004 experience, they hope to do better this time.
They said inconsistency has been their problem, do well in one match, next match dont do well.

WPT said they'll fight all out (bermati-matian) cos this may well be her last OG (she's 27 this year), next OG too old. Changing coach to Rexy gave them new additional stuff to learn on footwork, CHeah SK emphasised on wrist work.
CEH's knee is injured, she says need to be careful not to aggravate it but she will give her best.

CLELY
07-10-2008, 02:04 AM
Badminton players to be nicer at Olympic Games

AFP, HONG KONG
Wednesday, Jul 09, 2008, Page 19



http://www.taipeitimes.com/images/2008/07/09/thumbs/P19-080709-B1.jpg (http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/sport/photo/2008/07/09/2008028400)
Lin Dan of China returns the shuttlecock to Lee Chong Wei of Malaysia during their semi-final match at the Thomas Cup badminton tournament in Jakarta on May 16. PHOTO: AFP


FEATURE: First came the flying racket, then the shouting, and finally the shoving. The crowd watched stunned at this year’s Korean Open badminton final as an ugly scuffle erupted between world No. 1 one Lin Dan and a South Korean coach whose charge had the Chinese star on the ropes.

Lin, China’s best hope for badminton gold at the Olympics, apparently threw his racket in the direction of the coach, sparking a shouting match between the two. Lin’s coach joined the fracas and pushing ensued.

Officials struggled to restrain the two camps, before Lin received a yellow card for his trouble and lost the match. No apologies were offered, even after tempers had cooled.

Instead, Lin accused the coach of “verbally attacking” him during play, while the coach branded the world champion an “ill-cultivated player” — the worst he had ever known.

To outsiders badminton appears genteel, as lithe players, with deft precision and light footwork, flick a shuttlecock back and forth — all in the comfort of an air-conditioned stadium.

Unlike sports such as football and rugby, where kicking, head butting and even eye gouging in a muddy scrum seem likely, badminton appears, to the unsuspecting, sedate. But it has its share of controversy, theatrics and questionable conduct.

And although come the Beijing Olympics, players and coaches are almost certain to be on their best behavior, tensions will never the less be simmering below the surface.

Pundits, aware of the sport’s past blowups, rivalries and grudges, will be relishing a showdown between Lin, known as “Super Dan” to his fans, and arch-rival Olympic champion Taufik Hidayat of Indonesia.

Hidayat, branded the bad boy of badminton for his fiery temper, has clashed spectacularly with the world champion during their illustrious careers. Hidayat stunned spectators at the 2006 Hong Kong Open when, down in the first game of his quarter-final match against Lin, he stormed out in protest over a line-call.

Hidayat, whose career has drawn comparisons with tennis great John McEnroe, has since declared he has nothing against Lin, and also says he is a reformed and more relaxed character since the birth of his daughter last year.

--taken from : Taipei Times.com --

huangkwokhau
07-10-2008, 05:05 AM
Thats true...TH is more relax now.......way relax.....:D:D

george@chongwei
07-11-2008, 10:39 AM
New air con fires up badminton & artistic gymnastics Olympic venue (photos attached)

Updated:2007-05-12
12345
http://images.beijing-2008.org/20070512/Img214073869.jpg
Panoramic view of the gymnasium under construction

(BEIJING, March 21) -- The Beijing University of Technology Gymnasium - venue for the Badminton and Artistic Gymnastics competitions at the Games of the XXIX Olympiad - is ready to fire it up.
Its all new air conditioning system that is!
So, how do you keep the average room temperature of a gymnasium, housing more than 7,000 people during the peak summer heat of 26℃ - and at the same time ensure that the air-conditioning system would release air no faster than 0.2 m/sec?
The requirements for the air conditioning system at this Olympic venue are very strict. Too much air and a shuttlecock's flight or the artistry of a gymnast's ribbon movement will be affected.
Too little air and competitors, media and fans all begin to melt.
In addition to being an Olympic Venue in 2008, the University venue will host the Good Luck Beijing 2007 Artistic Gymnastics International Invitational Tournament later this year.
The South China University of Technology - responsible for making modifications to the air conditioning system – was under draconian guidelines that stipulated that ripping out sections of the building to put in a new air conditioning unit or altering the power of the current system would not be an option.
Instead. changes would have to be made to the air-conditioning vents. Experts at South China University of Technology suggested using a method of "breaking down the whole into its parts".
They would install three vents underneath every other seatback, for a total of 9,300 new air conditioning vents in the spectator seating area. These small vents would maintain the room temperature at 26℃ even with the loss of cool air as spectators enter the gymnasium.
The challenge was not in bringing the room temperature down but rather keeping the room temperature stable. Another challenge presented itself. How do you keep the venue temperature from rising when 7,000 people enter and leave the gymnasium at any given moment?
A clever design addition was the answer. The gymnasium entrance will be fitted with a double-layer door with a gap of over one meter-wide between the layers. The double layers will keep the air inside the gymnasium separate from the air outside. Not even a draft of air will be let in or out of the venue, thereby ensuring the stability of the venue's room temperature.
Last year, the Beijing University of Technology Gymnasium invited Li Yongbo, Head Coach of the Chinese national badminton team and his wife for a visit. Mrs. Li (Xie Ying) directs the artistic gymnastics department at the Gymnastics Management Center of State Sport General Bureau.
University Vice President Zhang Ailin hoped the couple could give them insight into how to solve their persistent air conditioning problems. Coach Li said that although they could easily convey the Olympic requirements, very few venues can meet them.
Badminton is a common sport in China but, of the 28 major events of the Olympic Games, it rarely takes the spotlight. In fact, until the 2008 Beijing 2008 Games, badminton venues have historically been temporary, makeshift ones.
Certainly, no one has considered the temperature of the badminton venue to be a potential problem. At the 2000 Sydney Olympic Games, the badminton venue was converted from a section of the Convention and Exhibition Center; at the 2004 Athens Olympic Games, the venue was created from a large cotton curtain separating inside from outside.
Now preparing for the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games, organizers will try their best to satisfy the needs of countless badminton fans. The Beijing University of Technology Gymnasium will come closest yet to meeting the requirements set by the International Badminton Federation for an appropriate badminton facility.
Famed Chinese badminton player Zhang Ning, says her favorite competition is the World Badminton Championships in Birmingham, England in March. One of the reasons for this is because the match takes place in March - when the temperature is just right and no air conditioning is needed.
After visiting the 2008 Beijing Games badminton venue, Ms. Zhang was promised that she would experience an air cooled badminton venue facility even better Birmingham.
And she was!
http://images.beijing-2008.org/20070512/Img214073870.jpg
Exterior of core venue

http://images.beijing-2008.org/20070512/Img214073871.jpg
Construction management office

http://images.beijing-2008.org/20070512/Img214073872.jpg
Safety and caution signs above core venue construction site entrance

http://images.beijing-2008.org/20070512/Img214073873.jpg
Core venue exterior

george@chongwei
07-11-2008, 10:41 AM
Denmark to dispatch ten-strong badminton squad

Updated:2008-07-08 (BEIJING, July 8) -- Denmark will dispatch a ten-person badminton squad to Beijing for the upcoming Olympic Games.
Veteran Peter Gade, four-time European champion and Athens Olympic Games semifinalist, will compete in the Men's Singles competition. He is currently ranked 9th in the world. 34-year-old Kenneth Jonassen, who is ranked fifth in the world, will also be part of the Danish team. He is the 2008 European Championships gold medalist.
In the women's singles, world No. 4 Tine Rasmussen, freshly crowned in the Singapore Super Series 2008, is expected to win a medal for Denmark.
Jens Eriksen will compete in the men's doubles competition with Martin Lundgaard. Triple Olympian Eriksen has been playing for the past 30 years and accomplished numerous achievements. Together with former partner Malene Thomsen, Eriksen seized a bronze medal in the Athens Olympic Games. The Olympic Games in Beijing this August will be his last. As such, the 39-year-old is eyeing a medal.
Lars Paaske and Jonas Rasmussen will also participate in the men's soubles. Considered Denmark's heroes, they won the first World Championships gold medal in men's soubles for Denmark in more than 20 years.
Women's doubles player Lena Frier Kristiansen will make her first Olympic appearance with 25-year-old Kamilla Rytter Juhl, who will also compete in the mixed doubles with Thomas Laybourn.
The drawing ceremony for the Beijing Olympic Games badminton competition will be hosted by the Badminton World Federation (BWF) in Beijing on July 26, 2008.
http://images.beijing2008.cn/20080709/Img214442345.jpg
Peter Gade (Photo credit: CFP)
Photo Gallery (http://photo.beijing2008.cn/en)>>
http://images.beijing2008.cn/20080709/Img214442346.jpg
Tine Rasmussen (Photo credit: CFP)

CLELY
07-12-2008, 01:07 AM
-Taken from : AFP Sport News (July 11, 2008)-

USA set to defend Olympic medal supremacy in Beijing

14 hours ago

WASHINGTON (AFP) — Americans will attempt to lead the overall medal table for the fourth Summer Olympics in a row next month in Beijing, but hosts China and Russia will challenge for supremacy in golds and total medals.
US teams had the greatest medal haul for a record fourth Games in a row at Los Angeles in 1932. While Soviet Union talent topped the table eight times from 1956 to 1992, it never equaled that mark.
US squads have led the medal charts at Atlanta in 1996, Sydney in 2000 and Athens four years ago. But this time, the Chinese are going for the medal crown as hosts and with a formidable squad backed by throngs of cheering supporters.
"Russia, China and the US are vying with the most legitimate shot at the top medal count at the Olympics," said Steve Roush, chief of sport performance for the US Olympic Committee (USOC).
"This is going to be a highly competitive field. It has created an excitement around these Olympics that has been missing for a while."
In 2004, Americans claimed 102 medals, 36 of them gold. Russians took 92 overall, 27 gold, while China had 63 overall but most, 32, were gold.
China's challenge figures to be formidable. Could the US team hit the wall?
"China has an incredibly strong team. Host nations generally have home field advantage. There's a job to be done," Roush said.
"They've infused large numbers of people behind their sports program. We probably pale in comparison in terms of the level we're able to give support to our athletes.
"They've hired the world's best coaches to come in and not only coach their athletes but coach their coaches so they can improve for future generations."
But don't count on the Americans handing over the crown without a fight.
"We have a strong team. We're making no allusions about thinking the Chinese have the stongest team," USOC chief executive Jim Scherr said.
The 2004 US team won 28 medals in swimming and 25 in athletics, more than half the total American medal haul from Athens. But no one wants to toss out a medal goal for Beijing.
"We hope to do much better than the team in Athens," US swim coach Mark Schubert said.
"We want to win as many medals as possible," US women's athletics coach Jeanette Bolden said.
After US medal totals of 101, 92 and 102 at the past three Olympics, that is likely to be the range needed this time.
"I've never talked about numbers. It's one of those pressures you don't need," said US men's Olympic track coach Bubba Thornton.
"I don't think it really matters where we are. Who wins the medal count? That's what (reporters) always ask about, put the graphic up there with the medal table.
"That's why we're going - to show our competitiveness, sportsmanship, how we do things."
Americans had 97 medals at Sydney before athletics star Marion Jones admitted being a dope cheat and was stripped of three golds and two bronzes, but USOC chairman Peter Ueberroth has vowed to send a "clean team" to Beijing.
Watch the stars who will give back medals in eight years is not exactly a great marketing slogan for the US-based corporate sponsors who greatly finance the Olympic movement.
"This will be a clean team," Ueberroth said. "We're proud of the progress we've made in doping. We don't have a guarantee but we're pleased. The things you are hearing about are from a previous era. We're in a new era."
Ueberroth thinks the US system of talent development will not be humbled by products of China's intense youth sport development programs.
"I think our system will be competitive and I think it will work," he said.
Swimmer Michael Phelps will be the top US star as he chases Mark Spitz's record of seven gold medals in a single Olympics.
Phelps took six golds and two bronzes at Athens, where US swimmers led the way with 12 gold, nine silver and seven bronze medals and Australia next with seven gold, five silver and three bronze. US men won nine golds overall.
Phelps is the world record-holder in four of his five individual events - the 200m freestyle, 200m butterfly and 200m and 400m individual medleys and is a former world record-holder in the 100 fly, where US teammate Ian Crocker has the world record.
"We have a very strong men's team. We're proud of that. But we have to go to the Olympics and perform," Schubert said. "A lot of our challenge on the men's side will come from the Australians, from the Japanese, from the Europeans."
The US Olympic lineup also features the reigning women's world gymnastics champions and all-around champion Shawn Johnson and a National Basketball Association squad set to reclaim the throne after slumping to a bronze in Athens.
Copyright © 2008 AFP. All rights reserved.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Looks like Michael Phelps will break 'swimming legend' Mark Spitz record in Beijing next month. The top-three USA, CHN and RUS will show off their sport superpower who will be the BEST between them, hmmm sounds so interesting!

ctjcad
07-19-2008, 09:38 AM
..as snipped from Yahoo!'s news wire...

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080719/ap_on_re_as/china_the_shutdown
================================================== ======
Beijing begins massive Olympic shutdown
By STEPHEN WADE, AP Sports Writer
2 hours, 53 minutes ago

BEIJING - Beijing's Olympic shutdown begins Sunday, a drastic plan to lift the Chinese capital's gray shroud of pollution just three weeks ahead of the games.

Half of Beijing's 3.3 million vehicles will be pulled off the roads and many polluting factories will be shuttered. Chemical plants, power stations and foundries left open have to cut emissions by 30 percent — and dust-spewing construction in the capital will be halted.

In a highly stage-managed Olympics aimed at showing off the rising power of the 21st century, no challenge is greater than producing crystalline air for 10,500 of the world's greatest athletes.

"Pea-soup air at the opening ceremony would be their worst nightmare," said Victor Cha, director of Asian Studies at Georgetown University.

Striking venues and $40 billion spent to improve infrastructure cannot mask Beijing's dirty air. A World Bank study found China is home to 16 of the 20 worst cities for air quality. Three-quarters of the water flowing through urban areas is unsuitable for drinking or fishing.

International Olympic Committee president Jacques Rogge has repeatedly warned that outdoor endurance events lasting more than an hour will be postponed if the air quality is poor.

Under the two-month plan, vehicles will be allowed on the roads every other day depending on even-odd registration numbers. In addition, 300,000 heavy polluting vehicles — aging industrial trucks, many of which operate only at night — were banned beginning July 1.

Five days after Sunday's traffic ban goes into effect, special Olympic traffic lanes will begin operating until Sept. 25, a plan that has been used in previous games. Beijing is setting aside 165 miles of roadway on which certified Olympic vehicles will be allowed to move from hotels, Olympic venues and Athletes Village.

To further ease congestion, employers are being asked to stagger work schedules. Public institutions will open an hour later than normal and two new subway lines scheduled to open Sunday should also bring relief.

The plan to clean the gray air seems to match the high-security tone of the games, which will be policed by 100,000 officials.

Razor-wire barriers and soldiers standing at attention guard the outskirts of the Olympic Green area and the Chinese have even installed ground-to-air missiles near one Olympic venue to protect it from possible attacks.

Security, tight visa rules and inflated hotel prices seem to be keeping foreigners away. Many nightspots near Olympic venue are being closed by security officials, who say the games are under threat from Muslim extremists in China's western Xinjiang region.

Beijing organizers are also in a protracted showdown with TV broadcasters, who are seeking free movement and reporting during the games. China's communist government seems to fear being embarrassed during the games by pro-Tibet activists, local dissidents or critics of China's human rights policies.

The gigantic experiment to curb pollution could still go wrong.

Veerabhadran Ramanathan, an atmospheric scientist at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego, said unpredictable winds could blow pollution into Beijing despite factory shutdowns in the city and five surrounding provinces.

Ramanathan is leading a multinational research project in tracking Beijing's pollution before, during and after the Olympics.

"Reducing the local emissions is going to reduce the local pollution, but is that sufficient to help the athletes breath cleaner air? This is going to depend on the winds," he said.

george@chongwei
07-20-2008, 10:26 AM
Beijingers told to mind their manners


By Michael Bristow
BBC News, Beijing
http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/shared/img/999999.gif

http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/44844000/jpg/_44844270_poster_b226_afp.jpg Olympics propaganda promotes smiles and displays of unity

Beijing citizens have been told not to pick their noses, yawn or scratch their heads when talking to foreigners during the Olympics.
They have also been given a list of things not to ask overseas visitors - a list so exhaustive it could make conversation difficult.
Ordinary people have also been given detailed instructions on how to talk to disabled people during the Paralympics.
Chinese officials want ordinary people to show the country's most civilised face during the sporting events.
A booklet prepared by the propaganda department of Beijing's Dongcheng District gives locals an introduction to the games.
It has a special section on dealing with foreigners, including what to do when talking to overseas visitors.
'Wear a smile'
"In conversation, wear a smile, don't stare too long or do anything to make people feel ill at ease," it says.

http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/shared/img/o.gif http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/nol/shared/img/v3/start_quote_rb.gif The booklet advises Beijing people to say to disabled people such things as: 'You're really excellent' http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/nol/shared/img/v3/end_quote_rb.gif


It also warns Beijing people not to yawn, shout, pick their noses, scratch their heads, play with their fingernails or pull at their clothes while talking. The booklet suggests people abide by the "eight don't ask" principle when talking to foreigners.
Subjects to avoid include what foreigners earn or how much they spend, how old they are, whether they are married and whether they are healthy.
Also off-limits are questions about where foreigners live, where they have worked, their religious or political beliefs, or what they are currently doing.
In the booklet, propaganda chiefs remind Beijing citizens to be careful when being interviewed by foreign journalists during the Olympics, which begin on 8 August.
It tells them not to say or do anything that harms national prestige, the country's image or national security.
Queuing day
Beijing officials are obviously concerned about how disabled people will be treated during the Paralympics, which takes place just after the Olympics.
"Before you help [a disabled person], first of all get their agreement and co-operation. Absolutely do not use force or be too enthusiastic," says the booklet.
http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/44844000/jpg/_44844268_queue_b226_afp.jpg Queuing is to be encouraged, say authorities

It advises Beijing people to say to disabled people such things as: "You're really excellent".
Officials have long been concerned about their own citizens' behaviour during the Olympics, and have launched several campaigns to stamp out bad habits.
The 11th day of the month was designated queuing day, instituted to convince people not to barge onto buses and trains.
These campaigns are generally supported by ordinary people.
"The queuing campaign definitely helps people to behave better," said Yang Xiaoyan as she waited to board a train at Beijing Yonghegong Temple subway station.
"In the past it was really chaotic at this subway station," she added.
Queuing, crossing the road, driving a car, watching Olympic events and talking to foreigners: Officials want to make sure everyone does it right.

CLELY
07-21-2008, 02:51 AM
High hopes for Asia at Beijing

Agence France-Presse
First Posted 12:12:00 07/21/2008

SINGAPORE -- Asian nations will without doubt bag plenty of medals at the Olympics but what is blindingly clear is that host China will outdo all its regional competitors.
At the 2004 Games in Athens 15 Olympic Council of Asia (OCA) nations fought their way onto the medal table.
A rampant China had its best-ever performance, finishing second overall to the United States with 32 gold, while Japan with 16 gold came fifth. South Korea's nine gold earned them ninth place.
The key question in August will be whether China can topple the United States as the world's most powerful sporting nation.
"China has an incredibly strong team. Host nations generally have home-field advantage," admitted Steve Roush, the US Olympic Committee chief of sport performance.
"It may keep me up at night but it's keeping up coaches and young athletes around this country too. There's a job to be done."
While the three Asian heavyweights should again take the bulk of the glory, smaller fry like Thailand, Taiwan, and Hong Kong put athletes on the podium in 2004 and will be looking to improve in Beijing.
Mongolia, Iran, Indonesia, North Korea, Uzbekistan, UAE, Kazakhstan, Syria, and India also tasted limited success.
While lacking in blue riband events like swimming and athletics, China remains dominant in diving, table tennis, and badminton. It is also strong on the shooting ranges while it's women's weightlifters are top class.
Hurdler Liu Xiang is their great hope on the track, while Wu Peng could pick up a medal in the pool.
With a resurgence in judo, swimming, wrestling and gymnastics, Japan, Asia's top nation sporting power before China bulldozed its way to the top, also did better than expected in Athens and will want to build on that in Beijing.
Their key aim will be overtake Australia in the medals table while keeping arch-rival South Korea at bay.
"We are targeting gold medals in two digits and a total of more than 30 medals. That is the bottom line," said Tomiaki Fukuda, head of Japan's delegation to Beijing.
They have high hopes for judo icon Ryoko Tani to win her third straight Olympic title while Mizuki Noguchi has her marathon crown to defend. In equestrian Hiroshi Hoketsu is Asia's oldest competitor at 67.
The Koreans have at least one trick up their sleeve in teenage swim sensation Park Tae-Hwan, who burst onto the scene at the 2006 Asian Games when he took three freestyle gold medals.
He followed it up with a stunning upset victory in the 400m freestyle at the world championships last year in Melbourne, inspiring other Asian swimmers as he gatecrashed the usual US-Australian domination of the sport.
He is South Korea's first world swimming champion and there are high hopes for him in Beijing.
Elsewhere, the region has some of the world's best boxers, with Thailand and and Uzbekistan having the talent to cause jitters in traditional Olympic power Cuba.
Thailand has one of its strongest boxing teams ever, led by defending light-welterweight champion Manus Boonjumnong, flyweight Somjit Jongjorhor, and bantamweight Worapoj Petchkoom.
"In previous editions, we rested our hopes on one or two boxers to take the medal," said Taweep Jantararoj, president of Amatuer Boxing Association of Thailand.
"For this Olympics, everyone has a chance."
Taiwan is a power in taekwondo, while badminton and table tennis are Asian domains. It will be the rest of the world trying to muscle into these sports rather than the other way round in Beijing.
Defending badminton champion Taufik Hidayat of Indonesia will again be out to upset world No.1 Lin Dan of China, while Lin's girlfriend Xie Xingfang is the player to beat in the women's event.
Paddlers from Hong Kong and Singapore will be snapping at China's heels in the table tennis, where Wang Hao and Zhang Yining are the best players currently on the planet.
Copyright 2008 Agence France-Presse. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

---Philippines Inquirer.net (Sport Breaking News)---

huangkwokhau
07-21-2008, 02:53 AM
hope asian countires do well beside China....

ctjcad
07-22-2008, 12:58 AM
...heard from a couple sources today and in the news, that some of Beijing's hotels (mostly 3 to 4-star hotels) will cut their rates up to 30%. Gas prices (airfare) & trouble of getting visas have been cited as main reasons.

http://malaysia.news.yahoo.com/ap/20080722/tap-as-oly-china-hotels-bb10fb8.html

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Beijing hotels slash rates after expected Olympic demand falters
By HENRY SANDERSON,Associated Press Writer AP - 54 minutes ago

BEIJING - Some hotels in Beijing have cut their rates by as much as 30 percent as expected high demand for the Olympic Games has not materialized, a travel agent said Tuesday.

Fan Runjun, an employee of the press department of popular travel Web site Ctrip.com, said many two- to four-star hotels have cut their rates by 10 percent to 20 percent compared to May and June. Some have cut rates by up to 30 percent, she said.

The Web site's English-language section deals with about 500 hotels.

Beijing was expecting 500,000 foreign guests for the Aug. 8-24 Olympics, but has been scaling back that estimate. Some people have been scared off by high prices, while others have had trouble getting visas.

China has ratcheted up security for the games, tightening visa rules even for foreign travelers who hold Olympics tickets. Multiple-entry visas have also been restricted, causing a drop in business travel.

The government has said the games are a target of terrorism, and reported breaking up plots to attack the games by Islamic radicals in the western province of Xinjiang. In a show of force, China's military has stationed a ground-to-air missile battery just 300 yards (273 meters) from one Beijing Olympic venue.

A man surnamed Wu from the China Hotel Management Association, who was unwilling to give his full name or position as is common in China, said most three-star hotels or below were cutting prices because occupancy rates were not as high as expected.

"The three-star hotels and those below might have seen the Olympics as a good opportunity to raise rates, and now that they found there aren't enough guests booking their rooms, they have to cut their prices," he said.

Most Olympic hotels that have been approved by the Beijing Olympic Organizing Committee are four- or five- star, he said, and their rooms have already been booked. Those hotels cater to Olympic officials, sponsors and national Olympic delegations. Their prices were set last year, by negotiation, rather than by market demand, he said.

CLELY
07-22-2008, 02:08 AM
Beijing Olympics: Battle for gold offers China first chance to 'defeat' America

The Olympic host is straining every sinew to dislodge the US from the top of the medals table, a badge of global superpower status.

By David Eimer in Beijing and Colin Freeman
Last Updated: 1:58AM BST 21 Jul 2008


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/telegraph/multimedia/archive/00778/olympics-us-china-4_778943c.jpg
China's attempt to end America's recent supremacy at the Games will add an East-West frisson not seen since the demise of the Soviet Union Photo: REUTERS

China's emerging rivalry with America as a global superpower will move into the sporting arena next month as its Olympic athletes strive to oust their US counterparts from the top of the medals table for the first time.
In a showdown reminiscent of the Cold War-era battles for Olympian dominance, China has put unprecedented effort into ensuring that Beijing 2008 will be a sporting triumph as well as a logistical one.
With their athletes already dominant in events such as gymnastics, table tennis and martial arts, Chinese sporting chiefs have spent the past few years focusing on disciplines where Americans have traditionally excelled, including swimming, basketball and athletics.
Such is the host nation's eagerness to sweep the board that it has borrowed Western sporting expertise: honing the skills of the Chinese women's basketball team, for example, is the Australian coach Tom Maher.
He was drafted into the job to replace the Chinese coach after the team failed to make the top eight in the 2004 Athens Olympics.
China's attempt to end America's run of supremacy at the last three Games will add an East-West frisson not seen since the demise of the Soviet Union, which topped the medals board eight times in the post-war period. While the rest of the world's eyes will be on the heroics of the individual contestants, Chinese officials will pay closest attention to the total medal tally. Some expect America to take an early lead with the many swimming events in the first few days – but be squeezed by China as other disciplines kick in.
The increasing focus on athletics as the 16-day contest progresses may favour America in the final stages.
Meanwhile, giving both countries a run for their money will be increasingly oil-rich Russia, which, like China, sees the Games as an opportunity to underscore its new-found economic and political clout.
Darryl Seibel, a spokesman for the US Olympic Committee, said: "We expect this to be one of the most competitive Olympics in recent history. That is down to a combination of China's investment in its Olympic programme, Russia's decision to do the same and the policy of some nations like Britain, which are targeting specific medals in sports that are important to them. China has to be considered the favourite. Every host nation receives a huge boost." China's new-found prowess in the international sporting arena is a product of both its increased openness to the outside world and its steady rise as a global economic gladiator.
Having boycotted the Games throughout the 1960s and 1970s because the International Olympic Committee recognised Taiwan as a member, the country notched up 15 gold medals in 1984, its first ever. By the Athens Games in 2004 it was in second place, winning 32 golds compared with America's 36.
Gold medal tallies, rather than tallies that also include bronzes and silvers, are the yardstick used by the International Olympic Committee to judge which nation ranks best. This year, China's gold share is likely to reach between 44 and 46 out of the 302 available, according to Simon Shibli, head of the Sport Industry Research Centre at Sheffield Hallam University.
"I predict they could top the table this year, based on them continuing their rate of improvement and factoring in the home nation effect," he said.
America, he estimated, would win 38 to 39 golds, although he stressed that his detailed analysis had focused on China alone.
Key to China's attempt to come first this year is Project 119, an intensive training programme that aims to maximise Chinese inroads into Western-dominated athletics and water sports, such as swimming, canoeing and sailing. Named after the total number of gold medals available in those disciplines, the project is responsible for producing heroes like Liu Xiang, the reigning Olympic and World 110 metres hurdles champion, whose victories have led to him being mobbed by fans wherever he goes in China.
The Chinese have also pumped money into more obscure sports such as archery and shooting, meaning that a host of relative unknowns could notch up additional medals. Golds are all but guaranteed, meanwhile, for the likes of Zhang Yining, the world's top female table tennis player, who is expected to repeat her double triumph at Athens.
Mao Zhi Xiong, professor of sports psychology at Beijing Sports University, insisted it was only a "possibility" that China would secure the biggest medal sweep. But he agreed that a Chinese victory would be boost its international prestige.
"If you win a lot of medals, then it shows you have advanced as a country," he said. "It means the economy is growing, that living standards are improving and that there is better technology."
Ai Baoguo, editor of the Chinese edition of Sports Illustrated, said both Chinese officialdom and the public had huge expectations of their Olympic team.
For successful athletes, the rewards go well beyond the medals podium, with large cash bonuses, test-free entry to university, and, thanks to the country's new-found spirit of capitalism, lucrative sponsorship deals.
But the training regimes are still reminiscent of those used in East Germany in the Soviet era. Promising children are hothoused from as young as six in elite, sports-focused boarding schools, where their access to their families is often limited. Only last week, Joseph Capousek, a successful German kayak coach who was recently sacked as trainer of the Chinese national team, said his former employers ran a military?style training regime where athletes were worked "like horses". Chinese officials have denied his claims.
American hopes for this year will be riding on the swimmers Michael Phelps and Katie Hoff, who hope to win eight and seven gold medals respectively. If Phelps succeeds he will beat the American swimmer Mark Spitz's 1972 record of seven golds for a single Games.
Should either of them fall ill for any reason, the potential damage to America's medal tallies would be substantial: fears of food poisoning have led the US Olympic Committee to bring in their own caterers to Beijing, which has not gone down well with their Chinese hosts.
A recent analysis by economists at PriceWaterhouseCoopers concluded that China was on target to win 88 medals overall, compared with 87 for the US, making the actual outcome too close to call.
Away from the sports field, and on more conventional superpower indices, it will take longer for China to overhaul America. Its nuclear arsenal numbers only a few hundred warheads compared with the thousands hoarded by Washington, despite increased military spending in recent years. In technology, design and innovation the gap is still closing, rather than closed.
However, Albert Keidel, a senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment for World Peace, a Washington think tank, suggested in a report this month that Beijing would eclipse the US in less than 30 years. "I find, using what I consider to be quite conservative growth projections, that China will pass the United States in total GDP in about 2035," he told The Sunday Telegraph. "And by about 2055 or so, it will be double the United States' economy."
Whatever happens in Beijing, Chinese supremacy at the Olympics looks almost certain within a matter of years.
Steve Roush, the US Olympic Committee's head of sports performance, said recently that with a population of 1.3 billion – more than four times that of the US – future Chinese dominance was a statistical certainty. "You start doing the math, and that's what keeps me up at night," he said.

Additional reporting: Tim Shipman in Washington and Simon Hart

---telegraph.co.uk (World News)---

Oldhand
07-22-2008, 04:03 AM
[...]Whatever happens in Beijing, Chinese supremacy at the Olympics looks almost certain within a matter of years.
Steve Roush, the US Olympic Committee's head of sports performance, said recently that with a population of 1.3 billion – more than four times that of the US – future Chinese dominance was a statistical certainty. "You start doing the math, and that's what keeps me up at night," he said.
That's not statistical certainty... that's statistical inanity :rolleyes:

Yes, it's more than just likely that China will overtake the US in the gold rush.
But it won't happen merely because of China's numbers.

More people doesn't mean better performance.
Many other factors hold more sway than numbers.

India has a population well in excess of a billion.
That isn't helping it win Olympic golds in individual events.
In fact, India has never won an Olympic gold in an individual event.

Steve Roush, please go to sleep ;)

Oldhand
07-22-2008, 05:51 AM
Hats off to Howard Bach :)
He continues to do what he can to promote badminton.

Here's NBC rehashing the 'commercial' story (http://www.nbcolympics.com/kcra/news/newsid=153329.html).

Badminton gains new fame
Badminton duo vs. Ortiz and Urlacher

Posted Monday, July 21, 2008 4:00 PM ET

Glaceau Vitamin Water has a new commercial out that is giving badminton some much owed attention.

The commercial features two of America's best in badminton and two big names in major American sports.

Howard Bach and Bob Malaythong can thank Boston Red Sox player David Ortiz and Chicago Bears linebacker Brian Urlacher for creating a buzz around badminton.

Bach and Malaythong portray China's #1 badminton team Yang and Lau.

"The commercial tried to be as authentic as possible and I think they did a good job," Malaythong said.

The team portraying China is no match against the rookie badminton players, Urlacher and Ortiz, who have vitamin c and tourine-packed Vitamin Water on their side.

Although badminton is largely unpopular in America, in other parts of the world it is a phenomenon. In Beijing for example badminton is one of the top 3 sports.

Some may wonder what inspired the American badminton duo to take part in the commercial.

"It's my way of trying to promote the sport and say, ‘Hey it's a serious sport, second most popular' I'll keep on saying that over and over again until people try it. It's a lot harder than it looks." Bach said.

Badminton may be more difficult than it looks, but swatting a shuttlecock has never been cooler in America.

"I had calls from friends, long lost friends, people I didn't know," Bach said.

The U.S. badminton team is adjusting to the fame that the commercial has brought to their sport.

"I think it was actually good because we had two high profiled athletes there too. One of them won the World Series so definitely they actually put badminton on the hot press too as well. So coming to the Olympics it's definitely one of the top sports that people are going to tune into," Bach said.

george@chongwei
07-24-2008, 12:04 AM
Wan Wah: Seedings don’t mean a thing at the Olympics
By LIM TEIK HUAT
KUALA LUMPUR: Only the top four doubles pairs will be seeded for the badminton competition in the Beijing Olympics this time, compared to eight previously.
But it makes no difference to veteran doubles player Lee Wan Wah, who will be partnering Choong Tan Fook in their third and final Olympic appearance.
Wan Wah-Tan Fook will be seeded fourth behind All-England champions Lee Yong-dae-Jung Jae-sung of South Korea.
Indonesia’s Markis Kido-Hendra Setiawan and China’s Fu Haifeng-Cai Yun will be the first and second seeds respectively when the Olympic badminton draw is made on Saturday.
http://thestar.com.my/archives/2008/7/24/sports/s_pg66heng.jpg Malaysian chef-de-mission Datuk Ho Koh Chye trying on the official attire for the Beijing Olympic Games with a little help from Mesuma manager William Heng. Looking on is Mesuma assistant manager Maya Heng. Mesuma are the official sponsors for the national team's attire.
Malaysia’s second pair of Koo Kien Keat-Tan Boon Heong, who will be making their Olympic debut, are not seeded.
“It would be better for the favourites if there were eight seeded pairs for the Olympics. From the current world rankings, it will be anyone’s game among the top eight pairs. Whoever hit top form have a chance to win it and it will be dangerous if we meet any of the fifth to eighth seeded pairs in the first round,” said Wan Wah.
Among those who could trouble the veteran pair from the early rounds onwards are World Championships bronze medallist Shuichi Sakamoto-Shintaro Ikeda, Danes Lars Paaske-Jonas Rasmussen and Jens Eriksen-Martin Lundgaard Hansen, South Korea’s Lee Jae-jin-Hwang Ji-man and Indonesia’s Alvent Yulianto-Luluk Hadiyanto.
For Wan Wah-Tan Fook, things remain unchanged in their third Olympics when it comes to preparation.
But what’s different is their approach this time, having learnt their lessons from the previous Olympic campaign in Athens four years ago.
They went in as the world number one after winning the Malaysian Open just before the Olympics but lost in the quarter-finals to South Koreans Lee Dong-soo-Yoo Yong-sung, who eventually went on to take silver.
“Our mentality is different. We will go in to compete and enjoy and not put unnecessary pressure on ourselves,” said the 33-year-old Wan Wah.
“The pressure was great then. In the end, we put too much pressure on ourselves.”
Wan Wah-Tan Fook’s best result at the Olympics was in Sydney 2000, where they lost to South Koreans Ha Tae-kwon-Kim Dong-moon in the play-off for the bronze medal.
“It’s rare to get a chance to play in three Olympics and I can’t imagine myself going for a fourth,” said Wan Wah.
“While we want to enjoy what should be our last Olympic campaign, that does not mean we will not take our chances if the opportunities arise.”

george@chongwei
07-24-2008, 12:04 AM
Shuttlers told not to court trouble during the Games

KUALA LUMPUR: Badminton players had better beware and not get involved in unnecessary on-court disputes from now on.
A yellow card shown to any player will now be valid for the entire tournament.
If the same player gets a second card, he or she will automatically be given the red card and one point will be deducted from his or her tally.
Previously, a yellow card given to a player is only valid for that particular match.
A yellow card is flashed when a player commits an offence like arguing with or objecting to the umpire.
Badminton Association of Malaysia (BAM) official Yap Tee Loy, who is familiar with the international rules, said it was a new ruling enforced by the Badminton World Federation from June and that not many were aware of it.
Tee Loy briefed the players after the end of yesterday’s training session.
It is important that the Malaysian players bound for the Beijing Olympics take heed of the warning, especially when the stakes are high.

CLELY
07-24-2008, 01:20 AM
China focus on repeating Athens gold tally


Tue Jul 22, 2008 10:44pm EDT
By John Ruwitch

HONG KONG (Reuters) - With its players leading the world rankings, momentum from a string of tournament wins and home court advantage, China's badminton team is primed for another gold medal haul at the Beijing Olympics.

China won three of the five titles in Athens and has dominated the sport since 2004, winning the Sudirman Cup, Thomas Cup and Uber Cup in the last year.

But some top players have suffered defeats in recent months and the mixed doubles remains a weak point.

"I agree that badminton in China has declined a bit but I am also pleased that internationally the standard of badminton has risen," state media quoted coach Li Yongbo as saying.
"That helps to push us to improve further."

In the men's singles, the pressure will be heavy on world number one Lin Dan, who was eliminated in the first round in Athens and has had his share of ups and downs this year.

Lin's biggest threat will probably come from world number two Lee Chong Wei of Malaysia who crushed Lin in the Thomas Cup semi-finals 21-12 21-14. China still advanced to beat South Korea after Lin defeated Park Sung-hwan in three games.

At the China Open, the men's doubles and mixed doubles were captured by Indonesia.

Olympic champion Taufik Hidayat of Indonesia will again be in the medal mix this year, Lin believes. Denmark's Peter Gade and South Korean team mates Park and Lee Hyun-ll also pose a threat in the men's singles.Last month, South Korea's hopes suffered a blow when Kim Jung-soo, head coach of the national team, was suspended after a police investigation into allegations of misappropriation of public funds.

China also has depth in the women's game. The top three in the world rankings are Chinese -- Xie Xingfang, Lu Lan and Zhu Lin -- and the home team will be very hard to beat in the singles, tradiotanlly China's strongest event.

But like the men, China's top women have faltered recently. Xie was beaten at the Uber Cup by Yao Jie of the Netherlands and was knocked out of the All England championships in the early rounds, as was Olympic champion Zhang Ning.

Denmark's Tine Rasmussen has won three major titles and could become the first non-Asian woman to win an Olympic gold since the world's fastest racquet sport was introduced at Barcelona Games in 1992.

Malaysian Wong Mew Choo will also be one to watch, having beaten Xie in the China Open, and also defeated world champion Zhu Lin and Zhang Ning.

(Editing by Robert Woodward) -- reuters.com --

george@chongwei
07-25-2008, 12:22 AM
Tan Fook gets into top shape as he prepares for his final Olympics

By RAJES PAUL

KUALA LUMPUR: National men’s doubles shuttler Choong Tan Fook used to struggle with his weight and fitness problems.
But all that is in the past. The 32-year-old has never looked in better shape as he prepares for a third bite at Olympic glory.
The leaner and fitter Tan Fook even has good vibes about next month’s Beijing Games, where he will make his third appearance with long-time partner Lee Wan Wah.
“I feel lighter, fitter and fresher. My movements on the court have also improved a lot,” said Tan Fook after a training session at Stadium Juara in Bukit Kiara yesterday.
http://thestar.com.my/archives/2008/7/25/sports/s_82tanfook.jpg A new man: Tan Fook says he now feels lighter, fitter and fresher.
“It reminds me of when I was in my early 20s. I have not felt this good for a long time. This is one of my best preparations.
“In fact, many say that I look thinner. I have not really lost a lot of weight but I have gained muscles.”
Tan Fook admitted that it was not easy for him to get into such good shape ahead of the Beijing Games and that it involved a lot of sacrifices.
“At my age, I found the physical training quite demanding. But I knew I had to go through the hardship to keep pace with a lot of the younger pairs,” he said.
“In fact, I am more conscious of what I eat these days. I am taking organic rice and cutting down on outside food.”
After his failure to land any medals with Wan Wah in their last two outings in Sydney 2000 and Athens 2004, Tan Fook is determined to end his badminton career on a high.
“It will probably be our toughest challenge. Playing under the 21-point rally scoring system has thrown the race for a medal wide open. The standard of the doubles pairs from Malaysia, China, Indonesia, Denmark, South Korea and Japan is quite close and it can be anybody’s game. It is now up to us to take our chances,” said Tan Fook.
National doubles chief coach Rexy Mainaky, while happy with the commitment shown by Tan Fook-Wan Wah in training, hoped that Tan Fook would be able to play well – consistently.
Besides Tan Fook-Wan Wah, Malaysia’s other doubles representatives in Beijing are Koo Kien Keat-Tan Boon Heong.
Malaysia last won a medal in the Olympics through Yap Kim Hock-Cheah Soon Kit, who won a silver at the 1996 Atlanta Games.

CLELY
07-25-2008, 02:46 AM
Mental preparation the key for Lee

Thu Jul 24, 2008 12:53am EDT

By John Ruwitch

HONG KONG (Reuters) - Lee Chong Wei holds one of Malaysia's best shots at a gold medal since the country first sent athletes to the Olympics 52 years ago, but the badminton shuttler says pressure is not a problem -- yet.

With two weeks to go before the Beijing Games begin, the world No. 2 told Reuters hard-core physical training had ended and he was now getting mentally prepared to face the best badminton players in the world.

"Now mainly the preparations are mental," Lee said by telephone from Kuala Lumpur after a training session. "...You must think you can win."

Lee said he and others on the national team were taking classes three days a week to get in the right frame of mind.

Beijing will be Lee's second Olympics after he lost in the second round in Athens to China's Hong Chen, but the 25-year-old said he had matured and improved since then.

Lee staged a stunning comeback to beat China's Lin Dan at the Malaysia Open in 2006, took him down again the next year at the Sudirman Cup, and then delivered a straight sets thrashing of the world number one at this year's Thomas Cup.

But Lin is not the only threat to Lee's hopes of gold.

Other top ranked contenders include Indonesia's Taufik Hidayat and Sony Dwi Kuncoro, China's Bao Chunlai, Lee Hyun-il of South Korea and Thailand's Boonsak Ponsana.

UPSETS AND PRESSURE

Lee said he was studying tapes of his opponents but trying not to worry too much about individuals.

"Every time it's a big tournament there are upsets. Everybody says maybe in the Olympics... the favorite players always lose in the early rounds," he said.

"I'm very careful about this also. I want to focus match to match and not think about which of my opponents will be very tough.

"Malaysia has won only three medals in Olympic competition, all in badminton, one of the most popular sports in the country. A silver and bronze were won in men's doubles, and one bronze was won by Rashid Sidek in men's singles in 1996.

Malaysia also has a shot at winning a medal in the men's doubles this year.

Choong Tan Fook and Lee Wan Wah are ranked number four by the Badminton World Federation while fifth ranked Koo Kien Keat and Tan Boon Heong won the men's doubles at the 2006 Asian Games and were number one in the world rankings last year.

For now, Lee says he is not nervous."Maybe when I go to Beijing I'll start to feel some pressure," he said.

(Editing by Peter Rutherford)
© Thomson Reuters 2008 All rights reserved

Jagdpanther
07-25-2008, 06:19 AM
Lee Chong Wei holds one of Malaysia's best shots at a gold medal since the country first sent athletes to the Olympics 52 years ago, but the badminton shuttler says pressure is not a problem -- yet.

An expression of uncertainty?
Sorry, I can't find any better phrase.

ctjcad
07-25-2008, 09:42 AM
..as seen on the local news this morning (i'm sure some of you guys have seen it).
I wonder if the OG's official ticketing website has been updated??..

http://cbs2.com/national/beijing.olympics.stampede.2.779729.html
and another one:
http://www.wtopnews.com/?nid=105&sid=1446648
================================================== ========
Jul 25, 2008 6:15 am US/Pacific
Olympics Ticket Sale Sparks Stampede
BEIJING (AP) ― Eager fans swarmed and in some cases scuffled as they lined up at sales windows Friday to get the final batch of tickets for next month's Olympics.

Scuffles broke out at one ticket site as officials opened additional sales windows, causing some fans to stampede ahead of others in a bid to buy some of the 250,000 tickets on sale.

"It was so unfair," said Ji Liqiang, who waited for 28 hours with Wang Zhenqiang, a fellow businessman from eastern Shandong province for a chance to buy tickets to the diving competition.

"Those who came late but were able to push forward got the tickets," he said.

The two lost their place in line in the scramble and instead of tickets to the diving - where China is a gold-medal favorite - they ended up with tickets to the synchronized swimming.

"It was very dangerous. I was afraid," Wang said. "People got hurt around me. They fell and injured their knees and elbows. A barricade was bent out of shape by the crowd."

Sun Weide, spokesman for Beijing's Olympic organizing committee, said "There were so many people who wanted tickets so we decided to open more ticket windows ... In general, so far the ticket sale has gone smoothly."

Xue Manjie, 19, and eight friends bought tickets after waiting since Thursday morning, but did not get ones for the basketball competition they wanted to see.

They settled for synchronized swimming and preliminary track and field events.

"We can't get the tickets for the games we want but at least we can have a look inside the Water Cube and the Bird's Nest," Xue said, referring to the swimming venue and the main athletics stadium.

Besides the tickets for Olympic events in Beijing, another 570,000 tickets are on sale for soccer matches in co-host cities: Tianjin, Shanghai, Shenyang and Qinhuangdao.

All told 6.8 million Olympic tickets have been available for domestic and foreign sales. The Olympics start Aug. 8.

In November, organizers were embarrassed when the computer system crashed, forcing organizers to sack the Olympic ticketing chief and revert to a lottery system to sell tickets.

Organizers say they are taking precautions against fake tickets and black market scalping - both common in China.

The official Xinhua News Agency said Thursday that Beijing police have detained 60 suspects for scalping Olympic Games tickets in the past two months, citing a police spokesman.

Those found selling tickets on the black market could face 10 to 15 days in detention, Xinhua said.

CLELY
07-26-2008, 04:00 AM
China names 639 for Beijing Olympic team; likely to be largest delegation

Posted: Friday July 25, 2008 4:47 AM

BEIJING (AP) -China unveiled its largest team of 639 athletes Friday for the Beijing Olympics, a squad many expect will dislodge the United States from the top of the medal table.

China is likely to field the biggest team when the games open in two weeks. This Chinese contingent is much larger than Athens, when 407 athletes were named. China fielded 311 athletes in Sydney eight years ago.

Stars such as basketball player Yao Ming and defending Olympic champion hurdler Liu Xiang will be under pressure to deliver at home.

China's government hopes the Olympics will show the country as a rising political and economic power. Any slip-up in medals, delivering clean air or controlling political protests would be seen as a failure of the Communist Party leadership.

"Only two weeks left, time is running short,'' Yao told the state-run news agency Xinhua. "I'm recovering well and my foot is OK, but I've still got problems with my physical condition.''

The Houston Rockets center returned to action last week's with China's national team in a victory over Serbia, his first game since a stress fracture in February in his left foot ended his NBA season.

Foreign reporters were barred from Friday's team unveiling, which was organized by China's General Administration of Sport.

China won 32 gold medals in 2004, four fewer than the United States. The United States topped China by 39 medals in the overall count. Russia also won 10 more medals overall than China, but had only 27 gold.

The United States said this week it would send 596 athletes to the games - 43 fewer than host China - although the roster can change because of unforeseen circumstances like injury or illness.

In a quest for more medals, China's state-run sports schools have been targeting relatively low-profile sports such as shooting, women's weightlifting, rowing, boxing and cycling. The Chinese are also expected to deliver in three sports they always dominate: diving, badminton and table tennis.

By contrast, the United States traditionally dominates two sports: swimming and track and field. The Americans have won slightly more than half their overall medals in the last two games in swimming and athletics.

China won only four gold medals in athletics and swimming in the past two Olympics combined.

One of the first head-to-head showdowns between China and the United States will come in men's basketball on Aug. 10 in an opening game in group play.

Many forecasters expect China and the United States to win more than 40 gold medals apiece. China will get a boost from competing at home before packed venues and patriotic fans. Satistics indicate the home advantage on average has been worth seven additional gold medals for the hosts over recent Olympics.

Chinese President Hu Jintao toured athlete training sites earlier this week in south Beijing. Hu was accompanied by Vice President Xi Jinping, who is viewed as the heir to Hu and the man leading Beijing game preparations.

"Win glory for the country,'' Hu told athletes in sports like gymnastics, table tennis and synchronized swimming. He went out of his way to thank Japanese Masayo Imura, who took over China's synchronized swimming team 18 months ago. She is one of 38 foreign coaches helping China's teams, Xinhua reported.

Lithuanian Jonas Kazlauskas is coaching men's basketball, Australian Tom Maher is coaching women's basketball, and American Jim Lefebvre is coaching China's baseball team. In addition, a Spaniard is the women's water polo coach, a Russian heads the powerful rowing team and South Koreans coach both men's and women's field hockey.

--sportsillustrated.cnn.com--

CLELY
07-27-2008, 04:37 AM
Athletes' Village opens in Beijing


By STEPHEN WADE, AP Sports Writer 2 hours, 40 minutes ago

The Athletes' Village for the Beijing Olympics held its official opening ceremony Sunday, an all-Chinese curtain raiser with basketball stars Yao Ming, Yi Jianlian and Wang Zhizhi heading a 265-member delegation of athletes and officials.
A few foreign delegations were in town Sunday — just 12 days before the opening ceremony of the games — but none appeared officially at the inauguration, which was festooned with confetti and dozens of Chinese children handing out Olympic mascots to some of country's most powerful politicians.
"We now welcome athletes from around the world to come to the games," said Chen Zhili, speaking from a stage draped in red. Chen is the so-called mayor of the village, and a vice president of the organizing committee.
"We will try to satisfy the needs of people from different cultural and religious backgrounds," said Chen, who received a symbolic gold key to the village from organizing committee president Liu Qi. Liu is also the head of Beijing's Communist Party.
The opening came on a hot, muggy morning made more uncomfortable by the thick haze of pollution hanging over the village, which is to house about 16,000 athletes and officials.
Despite drastic pollution-control measures that have been in effect for a week, Beijing's air quality appears much the same as it did before. The Athletes' Village was cloaked in choking smog, making it invisible from the main Olympic Green area just a half-mile away.
Beijing officials have pulled about half of the city's 3.3 million vehicles off the roads, closed factories in the capital and in a half-dozen surrounding provinces, and halted most construction in the city.
Yao declined to speak entering the amphitheater in the village area, but his teammates were a bit more talkative. Yao and other athletes were dressed in red blazers, yellow shirts and white trousers or skirts.
"I'm looking forward to the games, and I'm very excited about it," said Yi, who was traded a few weeks ago from Milwaukee Bucks to the New Jersey Nets. "I'm in good shape now and ready."
Wang, who was China's first player to crack the NBA, seemed most excited about Germany's qualification for the Olympic basketball tournament. That means a meeting with his friend and former teammate with the Dallas Mavericks, Dirk Nowitzki.
"I'll be happy to meet him in Beijing," Wang said. "We played basketball together and are good friends. I'll try to find a chance to show him around the city and bring him to a roast duck restaurant."
On Friday, China unveiled its team of 639 athletes. It's likely to be the largest of the games, slightly bigger than the 600-member U.S. team.
The 163-acre venue is a complex of high-rise apartments that contains a restaurant that can feed up to 6,000, a library, a clinic, swimming pools, tennis courts, basketball courts, jogging tracks, shopping areas and coffee shops. The village will also have its own fire station.
The apartments themselves are modestly decorated in marble and wood with balconies overlooking walkway and courtyards.
After the Olympics and Paralympics, the apartments will be refitted for sale. It's been widely reported the units have already sold out at prices quoted between 20,000-30,000 yuan ($2,800-4,220) per square yard. In round numbers, that means apartments will cost in the area of $500,000-$1 million — considered high even in Beijing's soaring property market.
The converted buildings are supposed to be ready late in 2009.

-- news.yahoo.com --

george@chongwei
07-27-2008, 11:41 PM
Badminton: Good chance for Mew Choo to spring a surprise
PETALING JAYA: All three Olympic medals for Malaysia have come from the men’s badminton players, but if the draw provides any indication there is hope of woman shuttler Wong Mew Choo breaking the trend in Beijing next month.
While the Badminton Association of Malaysia’s one-medal target remains despite the relatively tough draw facing the men shuttlers, head coach Yap Kim Hock is not discounting the chances of Mew Choo springing a surprise at the Games.
“I have studied the draw and it is good that the on-form Danish player Tine Rasmussen (pic) is in the top half of the draw and it will give Mew Choo a shot at going into the medal rounds.
“Bulgarian (Petya Pedelcheva), who is ranked in the top 20 now, should be her first test in the third round but Mew Choo should be able to overcome her.
http://thestar.com.my/archives/2008/7/28/sports/s_53tine.jpg
“Although Mew Choo will likely be up against Chinese opponents from the quarter-finals onwards, she has beaten them before in previous meetings. Being the underdog, anything can happen especially when the Chinese players are under pressure to win on home soil.
“Mew Choo has been coping well under Misbun Sidek’s training programme and it all depends on how she holds her game,” said Kim Hock.
If Mew Choo lives up to her billing as the eighth seed in her debut Olympic outing, she will likely face world number two Lu Lan of China in the quarter-finals. Mew Choo has a 2-3 record against Lu Lan and her last win over the Chinese was in the Singapore Open last year.
If Mew Choo upsets the Chinese, she will be up against top seed and world number one Xie Xingfang in the semi-finals.
The odds will be against the Malaysian but Mew Choo will be taking inspiration from her famous win over the lanky Chinese in the final of the China Open last year.
En route to winning that first Open title, Mew Choo also defeated reigning world champion Zhu Lin and Athens Olympic gold medallist Zhang Ning in the last eight and semi-finals respectively.
Zhang Ning will have to fight her way to the final from the bottom half of the draw and will likely face either World Championships runner-up Wang Chen of Hong Kong or Rasmussen.
Zhu Lin was not selected as only a maximum of three players can represent a country in badminton.
Apart from top singles hope Lee Chong Wei, Kim Hock added there is also a chance for veteran Wong Choong Hann to spring a surprise based on the draw.
Choong Hann meets defending Olympic champion Taufik Hidayat in his opening second round match but the Indonesian’s hopes of playing in Beijing hangs in the balance following his admission to the hospital for dengue fever a few days ago.
There is no replacement as the draw has been done and if Taufik does not recover in time, it would benefit Choong Hann.
“We have to wait and see but I think Choong Hann stands a chance of beating Taufik as he will not be in top physical condition.
“If Choong Hann clears the opening match, he has a chance to reach the last eight and should meet China’s Chen Jin.
“The chance is there for him to wrest a win and the same goes for our two men’s doubles pairs. The draw is not good for them but if they clear the first round, I am optimistic they will go far.”
Koo Kien Keat-Tan Boon Heong will be taking on Japanese Shuichi Sakamoto-Shintaro Ikeda, who ended their hopes of glory in the World Championships last year, while Choong Tan Fook-Lee Wan Wah face the second ranked South Korean pair of Lee Jae-jin-Hwang Ji-man, whom they lost to in the quarter-finals of the Asian Championships

CLELY
07-28-2008, 04:02 AM
Badminton: Good chance for Mew Choo to spring a surprise

“I have studied the draw and it is good that the on-form Danish player Tine Rasmussen (pic) is in the top half of the draw and it will give Mew Choo a shot at going into the medal rounds.

http://thestar.com.my/archives/2008/7/28/sports/s_53tine.jpg
“Although Mew Choo will likely be up against Chinese opponents from the quarter-finals onwards, she has beaten them before in previous meetings. Being the underdog, anything can happen especially when the Chinese players are under pressure to win on home soil.


Tine is in bottom-half draw not top-half as mentioned above.
Hmmm, looks like Tine is more dangerous for WMC than the Chinese, Lu Lan and XXF.

limsy
07-28-2008, 04:08 AM
Tine is in bottom-half draw not top-half as mentioned above.
Hmmm, looks like Tine is more dangerous for WMC than the Chinese, Lu Lan and XXF.

sure...only those still in MIGHTY CHINA WS dream think that china ws is more dangerous than TR

george@chongwei
07-28-2008, 08:35 AM
Lingering pollution worries China
By Michael Bristow
BBC News, Beijing
China has admitted it could introduce further emergency measures to cut air pollution during the Olympic Games.
One expert said that could mean taking 90% of Beijing's private cars off the streets at particularly bad times.
Figures show pollution levels have been relatively high over recent days - on some days thick smog is severely reducing visibility.
The BBC found one pollutant at the Olympic Village was three times higher than the recommended level on Monday.



China has already introduced a series of measures to curb air pollution, including taking half the city's cars off the roads.



If this new series of measures don't work, it's hard to think of what else this city can do - apart from pray for wind or rain
The BBC's James Reynolds

Polluting factories surrounding Beijing have also been told to close. But an article in the state-run China Daily gave details of the further, stricter measures that could be introduced.
"More vehicles could go off the roads, and all construction sites and some more factories in Beijing and its neighbouring areas could be closed temporarily," a front-page article said.
This was confirmed by Professor Zhu Tong, of Peking University, who advises the Beijing government about air pollution.
He confirmed that 90% of the city's private cars could be taken off the roads under these stricter controls.
Any emergency measures would be introduced 48 hours in advance of very bad pollution, he said.
"There is a chance... that we cannot meet the air quality standards so stricter measures are needed," said Prof Zhu.




He maintained that the current measures had reduced pollution, but not by enough to guarantee good air quality every day.
China promised to clean up its air pollution for this summer's games, but figures show it still does not meet the toughest World Health Organization standards.
Small particles in the air - PM10 - are a particular worry. WHO guidelines say 50 micrograms per cubic metre is the standard to aim for, but Beijing rarely hits that target.
At the Olympic Village on Monday, the BBC found the PM10 level was at least 145, while at the BBC office it was 134.
'Positive legacy'
Separately on Monday, Greenpeace published its assessment of China's efforts to clean up Beijing for the Olympic Games.
It says, that overall the attempt to get rid of pollution has created a "positive legacy" for the city and should be commended.
"Greenpeace found that Beijing achieved, and in some cases surpassed, original environmental goals," the report says.
But it said in other areas, including air quality, Beijing had not met targets, and has had to bring in short-term measures.
"Beijing could have adopted clean production measures more widely across the municipality to speed up the improvement of air quality," the report says.






Story from BBC NEWS:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/hi/asia-pacific/7528523.stm

Published: 2008/07/28 11:43:42 GMT

huangkwokhau
07-28-2008, 11:27 AM
Tough for china if they ban all private cars completely........

ctjcad
07-29-2008, 06:22 PM
..(okay, trying to find other news from other squads)..Here's one about the JPN squad's preparation..(article & pics courtesy of badzine.info/Miyuki Komiya)

http://www.badzine.info/content/view/1196/2/
================================================== =======
ROAD TO BEIJING: Final training for Japan
Japan’s badminton Olympians began their final training camp on July 20 at the National Training Centre in Tokyo. They will be training there for two weeks but both players and staff took some time out to talk to the press about their methods and their objectives.

Story and photos by Miyuki Komiya, Badzine Correspondent Live in Tokyo

http://www.badzine.info/images/stories/News/JAP4small.jpg
Throughout the camp, they will be working on reinforcing their physical strength and improving both technical and mental aspects of their game.

Park Joo-Bong, the former Olympic gold medallist in men’s doubles who is now in charge of Japan’s national team, suggested some of the ideas for this camp. One of them is image training using DVDs of the players’ matches.

"There is so much pressure in the Olympics," explains Park. "Players need to remove the pressure and to have confidence in themselves to perform well. As one way of helping them do this, we have prepared a DVD for each player to easily remember their best performance."

http://www.badzine.info/images/stories/News/JAP3small.jpg
The DVD for Ogura/Shiota has been prepared. One match featured on it is from their bronze medal performance at the Asian Badminton Championships in 2006. Another one is from the 2007 Malaysia Open when they defeated defending Olympic champions Yang Wei and Zhang Jiewen.

"I agreed with the selections for us,” Shiota said. “I believe that I had my best performances in those matches."

Ogura and Shiota don’t feel they are at their peak performance level yet. The pair of beauties lost to Japan’s other Olympic doubles pair Suetsuna/Maeda in a tournament two weeks ago. That tournament was Ogura's first after she sustained a lower back injury. Her lower back is getting better, but still has not healed completely. Ogura had been focusing only on physical training for about two months without ever hitting a shuttle so, needless to say, she wasn't able to play at the same level as before she was injured.

"We will rebuild our combination to get back to our top level in this camp,” Shiota said. “We will do it with positive thinking".

"I feel my back is getting better. I am sure that I will be going to Beijing with confidence," Ogura added.

After these comment, the pair returned to the court to resume their training. Ogura performed a powerful smash and moved quickly, making it appear that she is perfect condition.

The Japan Badminton Association is expecting a Japan’s first Olympic medal in Beijing. Despite the international success that Japanese shuttlers have enjoyed recently, they have yet to send their flag flying above the Olympic podium. However, it has been mainly since the introduction of the rally point system, which will be used for the first time at these Olympics, that the Japanese players have recorded most of their best international results.

http://www.badzine.info/images/stories/News/JAP1small.jpg
Suetsuna/Maeda reached the finals of the Djarum Indonesia Open Super Series last month while Ogura/Shiota and Sakamoto/Ikeda both won bronze medals in the 2007 World Championships. The latter pair also reached the semi-finals of the All England this year. Masuda/Ohtsuka got a win from Malaysians Koo and Tan at the French Open last fall, just a few weeks after beating Korea’s Lee/Jung at home.

Singles stars have also seen some success. Shoji Sato beat Peter Gade in the Thomas Cup this year while Eriko Hirose won bronze in two Super Series events last year, including the Singapore Open, where she beat both Wang Chen and Zhu Lin.

At the press conference that kicked off the training camp, each of the Olympians - all sporting their new Olympic uniforms (pictured below) - reiterated that they want to get a medal in the Beijing Olympics. To do this, they will all need to put in performances that will warrant easy selection for their next “Best of” training DVDs.

Kinji Zeniya, who has supported the Japanese National Team for a long time, said "We believe all of them have a chance to get a medal when they can play decisively and with courage. This rally system has an element of chance. Our players may surprise everyone with some good results."

All of the Olympians, as well as the staff who are working with them, are determined to inscribe the name of the first Japanese medallists on badminton history.

Masuda/Otsuka have even enlisted the help of Candra Wijaya. Candra is their teammate on their professional team in Japan. Although he had to leave Japan for his own preparations, he helped to train this Japanese pair until last week.

In fact, Japan has decided to send take a group of analysts to the Olympic Games. Their task will be to analyze the game of the Japanese athletes’ opponents. In other sports, in volleyball in particular, the Japanese team has seen some recent success with this method.

http://www.badzine.info/images/stories/News/JAP5small.jpg
The Japanese team will use every idea they can think of. Can these ideas really help the nation’s Olympians? We only can wait to see the results of the Olympics themselves to answer that question.

Many players and staff members, not all of them Japanese, have helped the Japanese Olympians to improve their performance. Instead of thankful words, the players themselves must show their appreciation by performing at their very best. In order to accomplish this, they are giving it their all in this last two weeks of training.

All Olympic related articles are brought to you in partnership with YONEX

ctjcad
07-29-2008, 06:45 PM
..(another Olympic related article, courtesy of badzine.info)

http://www.badzine.info/index2.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=1201&Itemid=42&pop=1&page=0
================================================== ========
OLYMPICS - Irish already on site
The Irish badminton delegation is one of the first ones to have reached Beijing, more than a week before the Games start, and the two players and their delegate were clearly happy about the Olympic Village and the badmitnon training Hall, located in the eastern part of the Chinese Capital.

"Beijing is fantastic, and the Olympic Village is by far the best. The training venue is perfect," said Donal O'halloran, team leader of the Irish badminton squad to Xinhua's Press Agency. "And I was told that the competition venue is even better. That's just fantastic."

"Setting foot in the Olympic Village, we all exclaim that it's by far the best one," he added.

"It's the best badminton hall I have ever seen, and it is only the Training Hall !!!" said Scott Evans, the Irish number one, to Badzine.

Irish badminton team has one men's singles player (Scott Evans) and one women's singles shuttler (Chloe Mc Gee) with a humble goal to advance into the second round.

ctjcad
07-29-2008, 06:47 PM
..(another Olympic related article from badzine.info)..

http://www.badzine.info/index2.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=1202&Itemid=42&pop=1&page=0
================================================== ========
OLYMPICS - Facts and figures
Here are few facts about the upcoming Olympics :

Oldest players :
Jens Eriksen from Denmark, 38, who was born on December 30, 1969 (men)
Michelle Edwards from South Africa, 34, born on July 11, 1974 (women)

Youngest player :
Lee Yong Dae from South Korea, 19, born on September 11, 1988 (men)
Deyanira Angulo from Mexico, 17, born on March 3, 1991
The tallest man is Craig Cooper from New Zealand, at 1.95 meters,
and the shortest Markis Kido from Indonesia, at 1.65 meters.

The tallest woman is Kamilla Rytter Juhl from Denmark, at 1.83 meters, and the shortest ones are Juliette Ah-Wan from Seychelles and Michelle Edwards from South Africa, both at 1.55 meters.

limsy
07-30-2008, 02:25 AM
oh...kido is the shortest among the men...hmm...but greater than many that taller tham him...^^...

LYB-Fan
07-30-2008, 02:32 AM
Tine is in bottom-half draw not top-half as mentioned above.
Hmmm, looks like Tine is more dangerous for WMC than the Chinese, Lu Lan and XXF.
off course that is the opinion of malaysian press....
meanwhile the china press has different opinion...

george@chongwei
07-30-2008, 11:50 PM
Kim Hock has to buy tickets to watch team in action
KUALA LUMPUR: Do not be surprised if you see Malaysian badminton head coach Yap Kim Hock sitting among the spectators during the competition at the Beijing Olympics next month.
With only a limited number of Olympic accreditation passes issued, Kim Hock has been forced to rely on tickets to get into the Beijing University of Technology Gymnasium, the venue for badminton from Aug 9-17.
Without the pass, he is also unable to enter the Athletes Village.
The Badminton Association of Malaysia (BAM) had initially received three passes for officials and these were given to Misbun Sidek, Wong Tat Meng and Rexy Mainaky.
Misbun is the coach for singles players Lee Chong Wei and Wong Mew Choo while Tat Meng is in charge of veteran Wong Choong Hann.
Rexy takes care of the doubles pairs – Koo Kien Keat-Tan Boon Heong and Choong Tan Fook-Lee Wan Wah (men) and Chin Eei Hui-Wong Pei Tty (women).
They later applied for an additional one and it was given to team manager Datuk Lim Teong Kiat.
Kim Hock said this would be the first major tournament where he would not get on-court access to the players during the Games.
“I was disappointed when I heard about this at first but that’s not a big problem for me. I accepted the fact that the accreditations for non-athletes are limited at the Olympics. I will be with the team during the few days of training sessions before the competition starts,” he said.
Kim Hock is not the only one affected. Physical trainer Sean Sturgess and Frederick Tan, the mental trainer for Chong Wei and Mew Choo, will also have to purchase tickets to get into the venue.
The Malaysian team, comprising nine shuttlers, will leave for Beijing on Aug 5 and may have to train at a different court if they are unable to get immediate access to the competition venue.
In Athens four years ago, Misbun and Kim Hock went as singles and doubles coaches respectively.

george@chongwei
07-31-2008, 12:06 AM
Big Olympic spend, but little debate


By Michael Bristow
BBC News, Beijing
With total spending expected to exceed $40bn (£20bn), Beijing's Olympic Games may be the most expensive in history.
China has spent the money on new stadiums, infrastructure projects and cleaning up the capital's polluted environment.
In other host cities, this high cost would have led to heated public debate, but in China there has been little controversy.
In a country where information is not always accessible, many people seem not to know how much is being spent.
Calculating the costs associated with an Olympic Games is a tricky business, and the Beijing event is no different.
One problem is deciding what is - and what is not - an Olympic-related cost.
Sporting arenas certainly come under the former category.


[Including infrastructure projects] the total bill is just over $42bn. By comparison, Athens four years ago cost about $16bn


According to the Beijing organising committee (Bocog), the city has spent 13bn yuan ($1.9bn) building 12 new stadiums and refurbishing others.
Many of these have been built with money from both government and the private sector.
City authorities put up half the money for China's new national stadium, known as the Bird's Nest. A private consortium paid the rest.
In return, these private firms will have the right to manage the stadium for 30 years before handing it back to the government.
Beijing organisers estimate they will also spend $2.1bn on operational costs, such as hosting the opening ceremony and staging sporting events.
Part of this money comes from the International Olympic Committee, which gets its money by selling sponsorship and television rights.
In addition to these costs, the city has spent $20.5bn over the past 10 years on environmental projects, according to Bocog.
There have been improvements to the city's water supplies, its sewage system and projects directed at cleaning up its polluted air.
Beijing has spent billions more dollars on new infrastructure projects, including a new airport terminal and extra subway lines.
The dragon-shaped airport terminal cost $4bn to build.
'Catalyst, not cause'
According to Xinhua, China's official news agency, these infrastructure projects mean the total bill is just over $42bn.
By comparison, Athens four years ago cost about $16bn.

But the Beijing organisers argue that some projects would have been carried out anyway and so are not really Olympic costs.
"The preparation for the Olympic Games has served as a catalyst for Beijing," said Bocog spokesman Sun Weide. "Beijing residents are going to benefit most."
But however you add up the figures, they come to a big sum, and in most other countries there would have been debate about the cost.
There is already controversy in London about the rising cost of hosting the next summer Olympics - still four years away.
Infrastructure and operational costs have already pushed the estimated tab up to about £11.3bn ($22.6bn).
A spokeswoman for the London organisers admitted that spiralling costs was "an issue that worries taxpayers".
But in China, there has been little public debate about how much China is spending on the Beijing Games, which begin on 8 August.
And all this in a country where, according to the World Bank, there were 135 million people living on less than $1.25 a day in 2005.
Lack of transparency
Journalism Professor Zhan Jiang, of China Youth University for Political Science, said the lack of debate partly stemmed from a lack of information.
"At the moment, the Chinese government is not completely open and transparent about how it spends its money," he said.
There has been some debate about the cost of the Olympics, he added, but mostly between academics.
On the streets, people seem to have little idea how much the Olympics is costing - and often do not care.
Beijing resident Wang Na does not know what the Olympic bill will be.
And the 26-year-old added: "It's worth it because this is an opportunity for the world to understand China and for us to entertain them."
Another resident, 30-year-old Zhang Ke, said: "We ought not to be evaluating the Olympics by asking how much it costs."
That kind of attitude towards government spending might change in the future, according to Prof Zhan.
He believes the more information people are given about spending, the more they will want to debate where the money goes.
But that is not going to happen before this Olympics.

Story from BBC NEWS:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/hi/asia-pacific/7523235.stm

CLELY
07-31-2008, 02:25 AM
Media face web censorship at Beijing Olympics


David Batty and agencies
guardian.co.uk, Wednesday July 30 2008

China has reneged on a pledge to provide journalists covering the Beijing Games with unrestricted internet access, Olympic officials have admitted.
Kevan Gosper, a senior member of the International Olympics Committee (IOC) who is overseeing the games, said yesterday that the only uncensored websites journalists at the event would have access to were those related to "Olympic competitions".
The admission contradicts China's promise to grant the international media "complete freedom to report" at the games, which it made seven years ago when bidding to host the Olympics.
The blocks on internet sites in the main press centre, which will house about 5,000 journalists, and other Olympic venues will make it difficult to retrieve information, particularly on political and human rights stories the government dislikes.
Journalists at the main press centre yesterday found they were unable to access sites such as Amnesty International or any site with Tibet in the URL. Some also complained about slow speeds, suggesting it might be an intentional ploy to discourage use.
"This type of censorship would have been unthinkable in Athens, but China seems to have more formalities," said Mihai Mironica, a journalist with ProTV in Romania. "If journalists cannot fully access the internet here, it will definitely be a problem."
And in April, Gosper and another senior IOC member, Hein Verbruggen, said they had received assurances from Chinese officials that web censorship would be lifted for journalists during the games. But Gosper yesterday said the IOC had only negotiated free access to sites about the games.
"My preoccupation and responsibility is to ensure that the games competitions are reported openly to the world," he said.
"The regulatory changes we negotiated with Bocog [Beijing Olympic Games], and which required Chinese legislative changes were to do with reporting on the games. This didn't necessarily extend to free access and reporting on everything that relates to China."
IOC officials have said the internet would be operational by "games time," which began on Sunday, when the Olympic village opened.
The IOC has maintained the Olympics is a sports event, and it should not intervene in politics. But human rights activists and media groups have criticised the IOC for failing to hold China to the promises made seven years ago when it won the bid.
"It is truly sad to see the IOC fail in this regard," said Vincent Brossell, a spokesman for the Paris-based press rights group Reporters Without Borders.

ctjcad
07-31-2008, 02:42 AM
Big Olympic spend, but little debate...
(rest of article snipped for brevity)
..i'm somewhat interested (to an extent looking fw & excited) to see, firsthand, all of these improvements and modernizations that have been undertaken in Beijing.:cool:

volcom
07-31-2008, 03:27 AM
..i'm somewhat interested (to an extent looking fw & excited) to see, firsthand, all of these improvements and modernizations that have been undertaken in Beijing.:cool:
Well when I was there in February, a lot of the structures were not finished or near completion at all. Like the gardens outside the aquarium etc....
and the Aquarium was so full of dust that it was completely Grey instead of blue.

IMHO too much money is being wasted on the Olympics and stupid Beijing while other states etc are getting jack all.

ctjcad
07-31-2008, 03:35 AM
..they've got their work cut out for them to really prep up everything (just 8 more days!)...Afterall, the world will be watching with anticipation. But i've a feeling they'll be ready! I know some foreign players have applauded what they've seen. Hope & pray the Beijing Olympics will be a success! And no major disturbances & problems should come and ruin it!:cool:

Off topic:Btw, are you coming to Beijing, this time around?? Or staying home??..:confused:

volcom
07-31-2008, 03:46 AM
..they've got their work cut out for them to really prep up everything (just 8 more days!)...Afterall, the world will be watching with anticipation. But i've a feeling they'll be ready! I know some foreign players have applauded what they've seen. Hope & pray the Beijing Olympics will be a success! And no major disturbances & problems should come and ruin it!:cool:

Off topic:Btw, are you coming to Beijing, this time around?? Or staying home??..:confused:
Staying home and watching it on TV... have got Uni during the period but will be still eagerly watching most of the events on Satellite TV :D:D....

Louisa
07-31-2008, 04:04 AM
Well when I was there in February, a lot of the structures were not finished or near completion at all. Like the gardens outside the aquarium etc....
and the Aquarium was so full of dust that it was completely Grey instead of blue.

IMHO too much money is being wasted on the Olympics and stupid Beijing while other states etc are getting jack all.
Well, China always springs us with surprise....Beijing welcome you...we are ready, these are the 2 songs play over and over in astro right now...

I believe, China is ready, Beijing is ready....and I m READY....:D

limsy
07-31-2008, 05:05 AM
Well, China always springs us with surprise....Beijing welcome you...we are ready, these are the 2 songs play over and over in astro right now...

I believe, China is ready, Beijing is ready....and I m READY....:D

ya...agree with u...

Oldhand
07-31-2008, 05:31 AM
Well when I was there in February, a lot of the structures were not finished or near completion at all. Like the gardens outside the aquarium etc....
and the Aquarium was so full of dust that it was completely Grey instead of blue.

IMHO too much money is being wasted on the Olympics and stupid Beijing while other states etc are getting jack all.

But one cannot but admire China for its preparations and achievements!

With huge sums required for humanitarian work in the quake-hit province, China must have relied on some very adroit financial management in these last few months to make every bit of these Olympian requirements happen on time.

It's amazing what a determined state can do even in the times of crisis :)

CLELY
08-01-2008, 02:52 AM
Some secrets out about Olympics opening ceremony

By ANITA CHANG, Associated Press Writer 11 hours, 52 minutes ago
BEIJING (AP)—Some secrets are out for the opening ceremony of the Beijing Olympics. One big one remains.
Video shot by South Korean television at a dress rehearsal this week was leaked, offering a first glimpse of the elaborate production.
Spoiler alert: Viewers can expect a dramatic countdown, giant whales, an illuminated globe and performers flying above the audience.

What remains a mystery is how the organizers—led by China’s most famous filmmaker Zhang Yimou—plan to light the Olympic cauldron. The identity of the final torchbearer has been guarded like a state secret and a mock cauldron lighting was not a part of recent rehearsals.
Chinese media reports have speculated that the cauldron will be lit by a fire-breathing dragon or phoenix. Others say the ceremony will have five torchbearers who set ablaze a cauldron shaped like the five interlocked Olympic rings.
Another guess involves basketball star Yao Ming, saying he will hold aloft in his massive hands a child who survived the May 12 earthquake that rattled Sichuan province, with the child tipping the torch into the cauldron.
While the ending of the ceremony is anyone’s guess, the video from South Korean broadcaster SBS offered the first preview of its opening. Rehearsals of the ceremony at the national stadium, known as the Bird’s Nest, have been guarded by three rings of checkpoints, with cast and crew members required to sign confidentiality agreements.
Media invited to such rehearsals are usually told not to reveal any specific details of the ceremony; the rehearsals generally do not show the climactic cauldron-lighting, to preserve its secrecy.
A Beijing Olympics official said Thursday the SBS report was “disappointing.” Sun Weide, spokesman for Beijing’s Olympic organizing committee, would not say whether SBS would be punished, only that officials were “checking into the situation.”
“But the fragments cannot demonstrate the full picture of the spectacular opening ceremony,” Sun said in a statement.
There were no great surprises from the video shot in the darkened stadium, although it showed the lavishness of the 3 1/2 -hour ceremony on Aug. 8, expected to boast a cast of 10,000. Zhang spent three years designing the spectacle, seeking to boil 5,000 years of Chinese history into a 50-minute show.
The leaked rehearsal footage showed undulating white columns apparently simulating a waterfall and giant blue whales projected onto the roof. An enormous blue-and-green illuminated globe appears on the floor of the stadium.
Dancers twirled ribbons, drummers drummed, and martial arts experts performed kicks and punches. Colorfully dressed performers suspended by wires floated above the audience.
One segment featured a half-dozen actors on a raised platform surrounded by hundreds of performers, while cymbals clanged noisily in the tradition of Beijing opera.
The most impressive part of the show is a countdown accompanied by drums, the SBS report said. Video showed rows of hundreds of people, flashing cards to form the number two, then one, while they chanted in Chinese and strobe lights flashed.
An SBS crew filmed the rehearsal without even having to sneak in, a network official said. SBS, one of South Korea’s major TV networks, shares Olympic broadcasting rights in Korea with two other networks.
“Nobody stopped us when we entered the main stadium on Monday. Chinese officials let us in after we showed our ID cards and we shot the rehearsal,” said the official, speaking with The Associated Press by phone from SBS’s Beijing bureau. He asked not to be identified by name because he was not authorized to speak to the media.
SBS spokesman Park Jae-man said it was regrettable if Olympics organizers felt offended by the broadcast.
“The purpose of the broadcast was aimed at heightening enthusiasm toward the Beijing Olympics by showing South Korean viewers the magnificence of the opening ceremony. There was no other intention,” Park said.
The video of the rehearsal circulated on Chinese message boards up until Thursday morning, but no working versions could easily be found in China by afternoon. It had also been removed from overseas video-sharing sites for apparent copyright violations.
A few details about the opening ceremony had already trickled out since rehearsals began at the stadium earlier this month.
Organizers couldn’t hide the fireworks exploding around the stadium. The show will include dozens of smiley face bursts and is expected to feature fireworks in the shape of a yellow dragon with red peony flowers in the background.
The main artistic director of the fireworks said they will be launched from more than 1,800 sites around the city, including major urban areas from Tiananmen Square to the stadium.

Associated Press writers Kwang-tae Kim and Jae-hyun Jeong in Seoul contributed to this report.

ctjcad
08-01-2008, 03:00 AM
..in another news that ant local CHN residents caught video-taping and sharing the opening ceremony videos online would be punished by being put in jail for 7 yrs!!...¡Ay, caramba!:eek: :p

LYB-Fan
08-01-2008, 03:11 AM
..in another news that ant local CHN residents caught video-taping and sharing the opening ceremony videos online would be punished by being put in jail for 7 yrs!!...¡Ay, caramba!:eek: :p
it's good for making them not try to spread the country secret

ctjcad
08-01-2008, 03:13 AM
..*shakes head*....7 yrs?!?!...over an Olympic/sporting event???..:confused: :p

limsy
08-01-2008, 07:37 AM
hmm...that hurt to beijing...10 year better

algonquinsmash
08-03-2008, 09:38 AM
I was told that this is Badminton's last time at the Olympics.. is this true?

huangkwokhau
08-03-2008, 11:17 AM
I was told that this is Badminton's last time at the Olympics.. is this true?
It is false news..for sure Olympic 2012 in London will have it.......

algonquinsmash
08-03-2008, 11:20 AM
I heard they were taking badminton out an chess is in..

algonquinsmash
08-03-2008, 11:21 AM
is that false too??

george@chongwei
08-03-2008, 11:22 AM
I was told that this is Badminton's last time at the Olympics.. is this true?
1 word: that is not true!!!
badminton will be an official olyimpic sport untill 2012.

algonquinsmash
08-03-2008, 11:23 AM
untill 2012.. after that??

george@chongwei
08-03-2008, 11:32 AM
untill 2012.. after that??
after that not sure...

Armor_tec_14
08-03-2008, 03:50 PM
I heard they were taking badminton out an chess is in..

I don't understand. Badminton is such an exciting sport. Why would they swap it with something like chess..i don't understand how chess can be classed as a sport to be honest :o

Edit: I Highly doubt it will happen though!

george@chongwei
08-04-2008, 12:03 AM
Xingfang just wants to cook for Lin Dan after Games

BEIJING: China’s Xie Xingfang was always a reluctant badminton player but presented with the chance to win an Olympic title on home soil, she is not going to waste her golden opportunity.
The 27-year-old world number one, one half of China’s most famous sporting couple along with top ranked men’s singles player Lin Dan, is hot favourite to wrest the Olympic crown away from compatriot and defending champion Zhang Ning.
Beijing will be Xie’s first Olympics – because of China’s great strength in depth she was left out of the team for Athens as she was then ranked only fourth in China – and is also likely to be her last.
“My goal is clear and simple, the gold medal in the women’s singles,” she recently told local media. “I know it is my last chance.”
Xingfang was not always so motivated. When she was picked up by a Guangzhou city sports school coach at the age of 7, she showed little interest in badminton and skipped all the morning training sessions.
But her talent easily made her one of China’s top prospects. After winning the doubles title at the world juniors with Zhang Jiewen in 1998, she was selected for the national team by coach Li Yongbo, who at once switched her to singles.
Feeling the pressure and lacking confidence, it took years for the long-time doubles player to get her first singles title at the Indonesian Open in 2003. In 2005 and 2006 she won the world titles.
The shuttler first met her boyfriend, men’s world number one Lin Dan, at the age of 16 at a training base in Fujian.
Their relationship was first made public in 2004 at the All-England Open. Lin Dan’s red roses and congratulatory kiss when Xingfang won the 2007 All-England title made the romance known around the world.
China’s badminton team are comparatively tolerant of relationships between players and they were not punished as they would have been in the table tennis team, for example.
Xingfang said their relationship helped them during the dark days of the Athens Olympics when she was left out of the team and Lin Dan was knocked out in the first round.
“I thought she might not be able to go on until 2008,” Lin Dan said. “It took great courage and motivation for her to make it.”
Xingfang regained her confidence by winning six major titles in a row to become world number one in April 2005.
“I can share my pressure with him,” she said of Lin Dan. “He is the kind of person that exerts himself to the utmost. After watching him play, I have become a bit more aggressive.”
Xingfang and Lin Dan won the women’s and men’s singles titles at the 2006 world championships in Madrid as well as the 2006 and 2007 All-England Open.
The pair are known as the “Condor Couple”, a nickname which has its origins in a novel by Louis Cha. The book describes the adventures of an impetuous young warrior and his calm, elder lover.
“After the Olympics I can finally live the life I really want to with holidays, studying and marriage ... I am really looking forward to it,” said Xingfang.
“I just want to be the woman who cooks soup for Lin Dan after the Games,” she said. – Reuters

george@chongwei
08-04-2008, 12:03 AM
Rexy: Malaysian men’s pairs have ways to counter Danes

KUALA LUMPUR: The Danish doubles players hold an advantage in the badminton game played under the 21-point best-of-five games rally-scoring format.
The Danes, according to Malaysia’s national doubles coach Rexy Mainaky, have good serves. And he thinks that this will be an important key to the success of a pair in the Beijing Olympics.
“The service is really important and I think, the Danes are the masters when it comes to this skill. They have variety in their serves and often, they trap their opponents to make the mistakes,” he said.
Denmark will be banking on their seasoned campaigners Jens Eriksen-Martin Lundgaard Hansen and Lars Paaske-Jonas Rasmussen for honours in the Olympics.
But having said that, Rexy said that the Malaysians had analysed their opponents’ game. And they had come out with ways to counter the services from the Danes.
The Malaysian pairs in the fray are Choong Tan Fook-Lee Wan Wah and Koo Kien Keat-Tan Boon Heong.
The Malaysians can only cross path with the Danes in the semi-finals with Kien Keat-Boon Heong taking on Paaske-Rasmussen and Tan Fook-Wan Wah up against two-time All-England champions Eriksen-Lundgaard Hansen.

george@chongwei
08-04-2008, 12:04 AM
Tan Fook-Wan Wah want to win first title on Chinese soil

By RAJES PAUL

KUALA LUMPUR: Veteran doubles pair Choong Tan Fook-Lee Wan Wah have let three major victories slip through their hands on China soil.
And the duo are determined to get it right when they make their final appearance in the Olympics in Beijing.
Tan Fook-Wan Wah enjoyed a high in Guangzhou in 2002 when they took Malaysia into the Thomas Cup final by clinching the winning point (3-1) in the semi-final tie against China.
But in the final against Indonesia, Wan Wah-Tan Fook ran out of steam and could not seal the tie for Malaysia – going down to the scratch combination of Halim Haryanto-Tri Kusharjanto. Malaysia went on to lose 2-3.
They also could not sustain their run after reaching the final of the 2003 China Open and the 2005 China Masters, going down to Jonas Rasmussen-Lars Paaske of Denmark and Guo Zhengdong-Xie Zhongbo of China respectively.
Wan Wah said that they hoped for better killer instincts.
“China brings good and bad memories. We have had good wins in China but we were unable to go all the way to win the titles. That was disappointing,” he said.
“People always say that we do not have a good finishing. We could have won three major titles in China if we had finished well.
“We will be back in China, this time for the Olympics, and hopefully we will go all the way in our bid to achieve our best results in the series.”
Wan Wah-Tan Fook, who first forged a partnership in 1995, returned empty-handed from the previous two Olympics.
For the Beijing Games, Tan Fook-Wan Wah are the fourth seeds and they open their campaign against South Koreans Lee Jae-jin-Hwang Ji-man, whom they lost to at the Asian Championships in Johor Baru this year.
Other interesting first-round matches in their same half of the draw are between Chinese second seeds Cai Yun-Fu Haifeng and Danes Jens Eriksen-Martin Lundgaard Hansen; and Indonesians Luluk Hadiyanto-Alven Yulianto against Japanese Tadashi Ohtsuka-Keita Masuda.
The top half of the draw has top seeds Markis Kido-Hendra Setiawan of Indonesia, South Koreans Lee Yong-dae-Jung Jae-sung, Danes Paaske-Rasmussen and Malaysians Koo Kien Keat-Tan Boon Heong.
“It is tough from the first round for everyone. But we will go into the tournament without the fear of losing. If we have this mentality, we will be able to go far,” added Wan Wah.

CLELY
08-04-2008, 12:31 AM
Olympic opening ceremonies unthinkable without music

By Sarah Marsh 1 hour, 26 minutes ago

LONDON (Reuters) - Imagine the Olympics Games void of music - the raising of the Olympic flag without the Olympic hymn, the parade of nations in a hushed stadium and synchronized swimming to the sounds of silence.
Music has helped turn the Olympics opening ceremony into one of sport's great occasions and Beijing organizers have already released pre-Olympic jingles, including the theme song for the 100-day countdown celebration featuring vocals by Hong Kong film hero Jackie Chan.
The musical lineup for the Beijing Games, which start on Friday, remains secret although the Olympics Cultural Festival, from June 23 to September 17, will include performances by Italian pop tenor Andrea Bocelli and British soprano Sarah Brightman.
The founding father of the modern Olympics, Baron Pierre de Coubertin, felt the Games needed to integrate sport and the arts and his zeal led to the creation of competitions in music, sculpture, painting, literature and architecture in 1912.
Winners of the so-called "Pentathlon of the muses" were, like their athletic counterparts, awarded gold, silver and bronze medals.
"He wanted (to include) the arts pretty much from the start and this was all part of his vision," said Olympic historian Phillip Barker.
"It was a nice idea to try and make out that everybody wasn't just a muddied oaf."
The competitions suffered, however, because judges deemed many of the entries substandard and refusing to award medals.
Another sticking point was the amateur rule that forbade professionals from participating in the Games, thereby preventing contributions from the artistic elite.
After 1948, the arts competitions were abandoned, and the host cities focused instead on the cultural festival held in the run-up to and throughout the Games.
Music has been especially prominent at the opening and closing ceremonies.
"In the opening ceremonies you have a lot of prescribed music. The Olympic hymn has to be sung ... and the national anthem of the host country," said the author of "100 Years of Olympic Music," William Guegold.
Increasingly though, host cities have integrated top class music acts into these ceremonies. Some of them have provided one for the Games' highlights and given worldwide fame to the artists.
On the occasion of the performance of opera star Montserrat Caballe at the Barcelona 1992 Games, journalist William Livingstone wrote in Stereo Review:
"Which champion gets the gold medal? Montserrat Caballe! Again, she demonstrates that she possesses one of the most beautiful voices ever to issue from a human throat."

CLASSICAL MEETS POP
It was in Barcelona that classical music met pop at the Olympics, marking the progressive move away from high-brow musical performances to crowd-pulling acts.

One of the most enduring memories from Barcelona was the crowds streaming out of the Montjuic stadium late at night accompanied by the haunting theme tune "Barcelona," recorded by Caballe with Queen singer Freddie Mercury.
Four years later in Atlanta, rock 'n' roll took over at the closing ceremony. Athletes poured into the stadium for the mother of all discos with Little Richard pounding out "Good Golly Miss Molly" and Stevie Wonder sang the John Lennon anthem "Imagine."
"The opening ceremonies are more of ritual and the closing ceremonies are more of a going-away party for the athletes, you will see more popular music that the athletes can relate to," said Guegold.
Popular in this instance also means money-making. Recordings of official and unofficial Olympic songs sell like hot pancakes and are heavily promoted and distributed throughout host cities.
An official album of around 30 Olympic songs is set to be released for the Beijing Olympics and retailed at some 3,000 shops in China.
Expectations for the musical lineup at the Beijing Games are high and the opening ceremony may be the most extravagant yet. The 2008 cultural festival will be the biggest so far.
The festival has been held every year since 2003 and included performances by some of China's best musicians and orchestras, film festivals, song competitions, exhibitions as well as some of the major landmarks in Games preparations such as the launch of the mascots.
"This is 2008, this is China," said Ren Xiaolong, deputy division chief at BOCOG's Ceremonies and Culture department. "We have more than a billion people so I think we can say it will be the biggest Olympic cultural festival ever."
(Additional reporting by Nick Mulvenney, editing by Robert Woodward)

huangkwokhau
08-04-2008, 12:33 AM
I hope Da Lang will be performing........

CLELY
08-04-2008, 01:34 AM
I hope Da Lang will be performing........

Hauge, do you mean Chinese famous pianist Lang Lang? I think he will be there...

huangkwokhau
08-04-2008, 01:36 AM
Hauge, do you mean Chinese famous pianist Lang Lang? I think he will be there...
No..he is the singer......

volcom
08-04-2008, 02:29 AM
I hope Da Lang will be performing........
You mean Dao Lang? :eek:

huangkwokhau
08-04-2008, 02:30 AM
You mean Dao Lang? :eek:
Yes.....:D:D I have his complete albums...Hope Dada Wa is performing too

ctjcad
08-04-2008, 02:45 AM
Olympic opening ceremonies unthinkable without music

By Sarah Marsh 1 hour, 26 minutes ago
...
...will be spectacular, to say the least. Too bad i'd probably have to watch the replay of it on tv.:p

samuel882
08-04-2008, 03:03 AM
...will be spectacular, to say the least. Too bad i'd probably have to watch the replay of it on tv.:p
LeeHom Wang & Rain (the hip hopper from Korea, not the INA doubles Rian :p) will be perfoming in Closing ceremnoy for OG08;)

ctjcad
08-04-2008, 03:06 AM
LeeHom Wang & Rain (the hip hopper from Korea, not the INA doubles Rian :p) will be perfoming in Closing ceremnoy for OG08;)
...magically turn me into some bubblegum-teeny-bopper-fan teenager/college kid, again, if you expect me to be a fan of them... ;)

samuel882
08-04-2008, 03:08 AM
Rexy: Malaysian men’s pairs have ways to counter Danes

KUALA LUMPUR: The Danish doubles players hold an advantage in the badminton game played under the 21-point best-of-five games rally-scoring format.
The Danes, according to Malaysia’s national doubles coach Rexy Mainaky, have good serves. And he thinks that this will be an important key to the success of a pair in the Beijing Olympics.
“The service is really important and I think, the Danes are the masters when it comes to this skill. They have variety in their serves and often, they trap their opponents to make the mistakes,” he said.
Denmark will be banking on their seasoned campaigners Jens Eriksen-Martin Lundgaard Hansen and Lars Paaske-Jonas Rasmussen for honours in the Olympics.
But having said that, Rexy said that the Malaysians had analysed their opponents’ game. And they had come out with ways to counter the services from the Danes.
The Malaysian pairs in the fray are Choong Tan Fook-Lee Wan Wah and Koo Kien Keat-Tan Boon Heong.
The Malaysians can only cross path with the Danes in the semi-finals with Kien Keat-Boon Heong taking on Paaske-Rasmussen and Tan Fook-Wan Wah up against two-time All-England champions Eriksen-Lundgaard Hansen.
Rexy think too far ahead, his 2 protege will have to clear the first round hurdles, in which they've got an awful record vs their respective opponents.
Park JB know very well how to handle KKK/TBH while HTK students should be quite confident of getting through the MAS oldies.
Even if KKK/TBH clear their nemesis in the first match, MK/HS expected to mount a revenge over them, especially the rejunevated Markis, with the death of his father, he certainly will wanna win this OG!

CLELY
08-04-2008, 03:25 AM
...will be spectacular, to say the least. Too bad i'd probably have to watch the replay of it on tv.:p

Yeah, spectacular as previous editions usually. Looks like many celebrities from Hongkong, Mainland and Taiwan are taking part to this sport top-event. The famous Jackie Chan definitely will sing one of Beijing OG theme song.

Oldhand
08-04-2008, 04:17 AM
Yeah, spectacular as previous editions usually. Looks like many celebrities from Hongkong, Mainland and Taiwan are taking part to this sport top-event. The famous Jackie Chan definitely will sing one of Beijing OG theme song.

Well, Jackie Chan isn't a bad singer (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ew_aM1o1Do)... ;)

... if it isn't going to be this kind of singing (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r-bA9FYB8HY) :p

george@chongwei
08-04-2008, 11:47 PM
Well wishes for Beijing-bound shuttlers after last training session at Bukit Jalil

By RAJES PAUL

KUALA LUMPUR: Wishes of “good luck” and “all the best” were the order of the day when the shuttlers for the Olympics completed their final training session at Gymnasium II in Bukit Jalil yesterday before they left for Beijing.
At midnight, nine players – Lee Chong Wei, Wong Choong Hann, Wong Mew Choo, Choong Tan Fook-Lee Wan Wah, Tan Boon Heong-Koo Kien Keat and Chin Eei Hui-Wong Pei Tty – took the flight on a mission to nail an elusive gold medal for Malaysia.
http://thestar.com.my/archives/2008/8/5/sports/p66badminton.jpg Ready for battle: The Malaysian badminton team posing with the Malaysian flag at the KLIA yesterday. The team left for the Beijing Olympic Games last night. – MOHD SAHAR MISNI / The Star
And hopes are high on badminton to deliver in Beijing.
During the final training session, the other players in the national training squad took the opportunity to show their support and wished the Olympic-bound team well.
Seasoned campaigner Choong Hann said that the players had given their best in training.
“We know that our team-mates, coaches and the whole country are behind us,” said the 31-year-old, who drew a first-round match against defending champion Taufik Hidayat of Indonesia.
“It will not be easy but we promise to give our best.
“Everyone of us has a mission to accomplish in Beijing.”
Malaysia have only won Olympic medals in badminton thus far. The sport made its debut at the 1992 Games in Barcelona and the men's pair of Razif-Jalani Sidek were the bronze medallists.
At the next Games in Atalanta in 1996, Cheah Soon Kit-Yap Kim Hock took the men's doubles silver and Rashid Sidek was the men's singles bronze medallist.

george@chongwei
08-04-2008, 11:47 PM
Boon Heong adopts a 'have fun' approach

The 21-year-old has found fun and joy playing badminton once again after being critical of himself for several failures this year.
And the cool and composed Kedahan hopes that his first Olympic outing with Koo Kien Keat will turn out to be the best in their two-year partnership.
http://thestar.com.my/archives/2008/8/5/sports/p66badminton.jpg Final tune-up: Beijing-bound men’s doubles players (from left) Choong Tan Fook, Koo Kien Keat, Lee Wan Wah and Tan Boon Heong listening to coach Rexy Mainaky during a training session yesterday.
“Kien Keat and I want to have fun in our first Games. We are not going to put any undue pressure on ourselves. It will be all about bringing out our best and enjoying each match as it comes. Nowadays, I do not get too worked up over simple mistakes even though I strive to make perfect shots,” said Boon Heong.
“I have given my best in training. I feel calm with myself and I hope to maintain this good feeling when I land in Beijing.”
Boon Heong-Kien Keat have failed in the defence of three Open titles this year – in Malaysia, England and Switzerland. And most of the times, the blame fell on Boon Heong for the lack of urgency in his game.
In the Thomas Cup Finals in Jakarta in May, Boon Heong was out of sorts and he was blunt in his attacks during the crucial semi-final tie against China. The pair lost to Cai Yun-Fu Haifeng in the first doubles match and Malaysia eventually lost the tie 2-3.
In the Beijing Olympics, Boon Heong-Kien Keat have a crucial first-round match against Japanese Shintaro Ikeda-Shuichi Sakamoto, whom they lost to in the World Championships last year and in the All-England this year.
“The first round will make all the difference for us. We can go far, if we clear this hurdle,” said Boon Heong.
The Malaysians have top seeds and world champions Markis Kido-Hendra Setiawan of Indonesia and China's Guo Zhengdong-Xie Zhongbo in their quarter of the draw. Also in the half are world number six Lee Yong-dae-Jung Jae-sung of South Korea and Danes Lars Paaske-Jonas Rasmussen.
Boon Heong is looking forward to the experience of playing in the Olympics.
“I was a national junior player when I watched our shuttlers in action during the 2004 Athens Olympics. Malaysia did not win a medal but it led me to think that one day I could be playing for the country in the Games,” he said.
“Everything has happened sooner than I imagined. Hopefully, we will be able to bring back home a medal.”
Even national doubles coach Rexy Mainaky is happy with Boon Heong's new attitude.
“He is more relaxed. He has been enjoying the training sessions. He has taken great effort to polish up his smashing skills. Let's hope he will show what he has gained in training in Beijing,” said Rexy.
Boon Heong-Kien Keat raised a hope of winning the country first gold medal at the Olympics when they ended the country's 36-year wait for a title at the 2006 Doha Asian Games. They went on a great run last year and won six titles – in Malaysia, England, Switzerland, the Philippines, Macau and Denmark.
But after firing blank this year, the Olympics could be their first title this year – albeit the most prized one.

george@chongwei
08-05-2008, 12:23 AM
Olympics will be safe, says China
Days before the Olympic Games open in Beijing, the Chinese authorities have said they are confident that athletes and spectators will be safe.
This assurance comes after an attack which killed 16 policemen in the restive Muslim region of Xinjiang.
A spokesman for the Beijing Games Organising Committee said preparations had been made to meet every conceivable threat at Games' venues.
Chinese media have blamed separatist Muslim militants for the attack.
"China has focused on strengthening security and protection around Olympic venues and at the Olympics Village, so Beijing is already prepared to respond to any threat," Beijing Games spokesman Sun Weide was quoted as saying.
The International Olympic Committee said it also believed the Chinese authorities had done everything possible "to ensure the security and safety of everyone at the Games".
In Monday's attack two men reportedly drove up to a border post in a rubbish truck and threw two grenades, before moving in to attack the policemen with knives.





Both attackers were captured during the raid near the city of Kashgar, Xinhua state news agency reported.
Kashgar, known as Kashi in Chinese, is some 4,000km (2,500 miles) from Beijing, near the border with Tajikistan.
Xinhua said the attack happened at about 0800 (0000 GMT), as the policemen were jogging outside the compound.
Although the episode happened a long way away from Beijing, the very fact that it happened four days before the opening ceremony of the Olympic Games, will make the organisers nervous, says the BBC's James Reynolds in Xinjiang.
Around 100,000 police and soldiers are on standby ahead of Friday's opening ceremony, and the already tight security has been stepped up in Tiananmen Square.
Uighur suppression
Xinjiang, in the north-west of the country, is home to the Muslim Uighur people. Uighur separatists have waged a low-level campaign against Chinese rule for decades.
Human rights groups say Beijing is suppressing the rights of Uighurs.
Last week, a senior Chinese army officer warned that Islamic separatists were the biggest danger to the Olympics.



CHINA'S UIGHURS
Ethnically Turkic Muslims, mainly in Xinjiang
Made bid for independent state in 1940s
Sporadic violence in Xinjiang since 1991
Uighurs worried about Chinese immigration and erosion of traditional culture

Col Tian Yixiang of the Olympics security command centre told reporters the main threat came from the "East Turkestan terrorist organisation".
The term is used by the government to refer to Islamist separatists in Xinjiang.
Late last month a group called the Turkestan Islamic Party said it had blown up buses in Shanghai and Yunnan, killing five people.
But China denied that the explosions were acts of terrorism.
The Washington-based IntelCenter, which monitors terrorism communications, said the Turkestan Islamic Party had released a video entitled Our Blessed Jihad in Yunnan.
In it, the group's leader, Commander Seyfullah, said it was responsible for several attacks and threatened the Olympics.
"The Chinese have haughtily ignored our warnings," IntelCenter quoted him as saying.
"The Turkestan Islamic Party volunteers... have started urgent actions."

Story from BBC NEWS:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/hi/asia-pacific/7542167.stm

Heong
08-05-2008, 12:33 AM
I was told that this is Badminton's last time at the Olympics.. is this true?
no it's not true

CLELY
08-05-2008, 01:34 AM
Well, Jackie Chan isn't a bad singer (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ew_aM1o1Do)... ;)

... if it isn't going to be this kind of singing (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r-bA9FYB8HY) :p

I guess his vocal is so standard but yeah not bad. Just wondering whether the organizer will invite international top-singers to perform in Opening Ceremony or not.

CLELY
08-05-2008, 01:40 AM
From The Times
August 5, 2008

IOC starts legal action over Beijing Olympics ticket scam

Hannah Fletcher in Beijing and Sophie Tedmanson

The International Olympic Committee began legal action against a website yesterday that allegedly set up a worldwide Olympic ticketing scam.
Hundreds of people in Britain, America, Belgium and Australia, desperate to be present at what are expected to be the biggest Games in history, paid about £30,000 for tickets and accommodation that did not exist to the website www.beijingtickets.com (http://www.beijingtickets.com).
The International Olympic Committee began receiving complaints after travellers, including the parents and friends of competing athletes, arrived in Beijing to find themselves stranded.

Only a few hours earlier the website had looked so legitimate that it reportedly even fooled online fraud specialists.
It was based in the US and claimed to have offices in London and Sydney. It offered accurate information on events, a highly professional booking system and was littered with official-looking Olympic logos.
It was also advertising tickets to events that have been sold out for more than a week, however, including seats at the opening ceremony on Friday for about £1,100.
A final batch of 250,000 tickets released on July 25 prompted long queues, scuffles and brawls in Beijing. Two days later it was announced that tickets to every event except football matches outside the Chinese capital had been sold out.
The committee insisted that it was unable to compensate duped consumers but in the run-up to the Olympics it has been working hard to crack down on the rogue online ticket trade – an industry worth £1.5 billion in Britain alone.
Two weeks ago the International Olympic Committee and the US Olympic Committee shut a similar site, beijing-tickets2008.com. Officials admitted that they have no idea if the site has truly closed or simply moved to a new online address.

ctjcad
08-05-2008, 01:53 AM
..(wanted to post the news y'day)...that same exact scam ticketing website was mentioned in a couple of the threads here, below.:(..Hopefully no BCers actually fell for and became victims of this outrageous scam.:mad::crying:
A lot of Aussies were caught up in the scam.

http://www.badmintoncentral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=57856

http://www.badmintoncentral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=50556

http://au.sports.yahoo.com/olympics/news/article/-/4849117/aussies-caught-olympic-ticket-scam
================================================== ========
Aussies caught up in Olympic ticket scam
AAP - August 3, 2008, 6:14 pm

Olympic officials will ask a judge in California on Monday to shut down an online Beijing Olympics ticket seller accused of scamming Australian, US and European sports fans and travel agents out of tens of thousands of dollars.

The slick, professional-looking website, www.beijingticketing.com, boasts offices in Sydney, London and New York.

It is believed the offices do not exist.

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) has received complaints from hundreds of alleged victims in Australia and the rest of the world who fear they have been duped.

Some customers handed over more than $US57,000 ($A60,600) each for tickets, but received nothing back.

The people behind the website appear to have vanished just days before the opening ceremony in Beijing.

The only address on the website leads to an office in Phoenix, Arizona, but desperate fans hoping to travel to Beijing discovered another dead end when they visited the office.

The office was empty.

When AAP repeatedly called the phone number on the website, it rang out.

Texas-based travel agent, Jolanta Sochacka, is one of the scam's biggest victims.

Sochacka told the Los Angeles Times newspaper she purchased $US57,000 ($A60,600) worth of tickets for a family of seven but has not sighted the tickets.

When Sochacka asked a friend in Phoenix to check out the address, the friend found an empty office and no sign the company ever resided there.

"I've been in business for 18 years, I'm aware that there's fraud out there," Sochacka told the LA Times.

"But they looked so legitimate, their website was so elaborate."

The IOC and the US Olympic Committee (USOC) have had success in shutting another suspected Beijing Olympics ticket website scam down.

On July 23 they won a restraining order in Phoenix to close www.beijing-tickets2008.com.

On Monday, the IOC and USOC will ask a federal judge in San Francisco for an order to shutdown beijingticketing.com

The FBI may become involved in the investigation.

Other apparent victims of beijingticketing.com include internet entrepreneurs and software developers, who say despite their own expertise and experience with the internet, they were fooled by the elaborate website.

The site boasts: "We manage our extensive network of ticket agents through our three international offices - London, New York and Sydney".

David Boctor, a Los Angeles Internet entrepreneur who runs his own online retail store, paid beijingticketing.com $US11,505 ($A12,230) for hard-to-get tickets to the Olympic opening ceremony, swimming and diving.

He told the LA Times he became suspicious when the company stopped answering his phone calls in April and his credit card was charged for airline tickets he did not buy.

"If I failed to recognise this internet scam, very few other individuals with less of an e-commerce background would have had a chance," Boctor said.

"So I can empathise with others in the same position."

Another computer savvy victim California-based victim, Jonathan Murray, bought $US4,950 ($A5,260) for Olympic equestrian events.

"I work for a fairly large software company, and the team I manage is responsible for dealing with Internet crime," Murray, originally from Britain, told the newspaper.

"So it was quite amusing to everyone at work that I had been scammed on the internet.

"The important point I'm making by talking about this is that this was a bloody good scam."

Meanwhile in Beijing, Australian Olympic Committee (AOC) deputy chef de mission Lynne Bates said everyone involved in the Olympic family had been encouraged to purchase tickets through the official CoSport agency to avoid such problems.

"Of course it's disappointing," she told reporters in Beijing.

"We realise and understand that the IOC are looking to shut down and take further action on that website.

"But we at the Australian Olympic Committee of course have encouraged everyone, all our shadow team members, everybody that's part of the Olympic family, and advertised it very very widely, that CoSport are our official ticket agent and encouraged all enquiries and everybody to go that way.

"So hopefully there's not too many (affected), but as I say all the people that have followed the co-sport line will be fine."

cooler
08-05-2008, 02:05 AM
i saw this ad but didn't post it, maybe now i should.
--------------------------------------------
Over the last few weeks and months, a number of websites designed to mimic official Olympic websites have been selling unsuspecting Olympics fans non-existent tickets to the 2008 Beijing Summer Olympic Games. Thousands of people expecting the experience of a lifetime have instead experienced the disappointment and shock of discovering just days before venturing to Beijing that the tickets they treasured simply do not exist.


The law firm of Moriarty Leyendecker Erben is in the process of tracking down the history of these fraudulent ticket sales, and determining who is responsible for allowing them to happen. We believe that anyone who played a role in stealing money and the hopes of a trip of a lifetime should be held accountable. If you believe you have been defrauded by one of these scams, we would like to hear from you. A brief questionnaire that will let you tell us about the problem can be found here.

Who Are We?
Moriarty Leyendecker Erben is a no-nonsense law firm that prides itself on protecting people who have been cheated. Since 1976, the firm has represented more than 25,000 clients in 48 states and several foreign countries. Our cases and approach to litigation have been reported by The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, 60 Minutes, American Lawyer, National Law Journal, Texas Lawyer, NBC-TV, CBS Radio, The Boston Globe, The Dallas Morning News, Good Morning America, and The Houston Chronicle, among others. Kurt Eichenwald of The New York Times featured the legal team in his book, Serpent On the Rock.

george@chongwei
08-05-2008, 11:37 PM
Olympic relay in Beijing climax
The Olympic flame is being carried through the streets of Beijing, on the final leg of its global relay.
Torch bearers left the Forbidden City and carried the flame to landmarks such as Tiananmen Square ahead of Friday's opening ceremony of the Games.
The torch has travelled 140,000km (87,000 miles) through six continents since it left Greece on 24 March.
The relay has been marked by protests over China's human-rights record and its policies in Tibet.
Cheering, flag-waving crowds greeted the Olympic torch as it began its last leg on Wednesday.
One of China's best-known sportsmen, basketball star Yao Ming, carried the torch through Tiananmen Square, receiving a rapturous reception from the crowd.
More than 800 torch bearers are taking part in the three-day relay across the city of 17 million people.
On Tuesday, the flame passed through Sichuan province, which was devastated by an earthquake in May.
A minute's silence was held in Guang'an city, honouring almost 70,000 people who were killed in the quake.
The torch had been scheduled to visit Sichuan in mid-June, but the area's relay leg was postponed because of the quake, which left around five million people homeless.
Foreigners arrested
China's authorities have said they are confident that all athletes and spectators will be safe, after an attack by suspected separatist Muslim militants killed 16 policemen on Monday in the western region of Xinjiang.


A spokesman for the organisers said preparations had been made to protect some 10,500 athletes from 205 countries during the Olympics.
"China has focused on strengthening security and protection around Olympic venues and at the Olympics Village, so Beijing is already prepared to respond to any threat," Beijing Games spokesman Sun Weide was quoted as saying.
Officials in the co-host city of Shanghai say all shops and businesses in the metro stations have now been closed until after the Olympic Games because of public security concerns.
The operator of the underground rail system, Shentong Metro Group, said the move would affect more than 1,000 shops, and even vending machines would be closed. It said it would not provide compensation for business owners.
Meanwhile state media reported that four pro-Tibet activists from Britain and the US had been arrested in Beijing after a brief protest close to the Olympic stadium.
They had unfurled two large "Free Tibet" banners from electricity poles, despite tight security.
The international leg of the torch's tour earlier this year was marred by protests in several cities - including London, Paris and San Francisco.
Activists demonstrated against China's human-rights record and its handling of violent anti-Beijing protests in March in Tibet.
The International Olympic Committee said it believed the Chinese authorities had done everything possible "to ensure the security and safety of everyone at the Games".
The IOC has also assured athletes that the smog which often plagues the city would not pose major health problems.

george@chongwei
08-05-2008, 11:38 PM
Misbun: Watch Mew Choo

KUALA LUMPUR: Coach Misbun Sidek believes that Wong Mew Choo has been handed the best opportunity to get into the history books as the first Malaysian female athlete to win a medal in the Olympics.
“She has done well in training and there are no complaint of any serious injury. She is looking into everything positively. On top of that, she has been given a favourable draw,” said Misbun.
“It is now up to Mew Choo to take her chances well. There is a chance for her to win at least a bronze medal for the country.”
Mew Choo, the China Open champion, has a smooth path to get into the quarter-finals where she is tipped to meet third seed Lu Lan, who comes into the Games as the third Chinese player for the women’s singles in favour of an under-performing world champion Zhu Lin.
Mew Choo has a good record against Lu Lan, whom she had beaten twice in three meetings. In the same half of the draw is Chinese top seed Xie Xingfang, who has in her quarter Germany’s Xu Huaiwen and Hong Kong's Yip Pui Yin.
The other half of the draw has second seed and defending champion Zhang Ning, Dane Tine Rasmussen, Hong Kong's Wang Chen and France's Pi Hongyan.
It will be tough for Malaysia's Chin Eei Hui-Wong Pei Tty to clear their opening round women's doubles match against formidable South Koreans Lee Kyung-won-Lee Hyo-jung.

george@chongwei
08-05-2008, 11:38 PM
Chong Wei hopes to topple Lin Dan and win a gold medal for fans

By RAJES PAUL

BADMINTON
VENUE: Beijing University of Technology Gymnasium COMPETITION DATES: Aug 9-17 MEDALS AT STAKE: 5-5-5
THE TEAM Men: Lee Chong Wei, Wong Choong Hann (singles); Koo Kien Keat-Tan Boon Heong, Lee Wan Wah-Choong Tan Fook (doubles) Women: Wong Mew Choo (singles); Chin Eei Hui-Wong Pei Tty (doubles) Manager: Datuk Lim Teong Kiat. Coaches: Yap Kim Hock, Misbun Sidek, Rexy Mainaky, Wong Tat Meng
PAST ACHIEVEMENTS 1992 Barcelona: Jalani-Razif Sidek (doubles, bronze) 1996 Atlanta: Yap Kim Hock-Cheah Soon Kit (doubles, silver); Rashid Sidek (singles, bronze) 2000 Sydney: No medals 2004 Athens: No medals
KUALA LUMPUR: It was eight years ago but national number one Lee Chong Wei still remembers vividly his first painful defeat by China's Lin Dan.
In his first international tournament, the 2000 Asian Junior Championships in Kyoto, Chong Wei lost by just one point to Lin Dan in the rubber game (15-8, 7-15, 17-16) in the quarter-final match. The Chinese went on to lift the title.
There will be another clash of titans between Lin Dan and Chong Wei in the final of the Beijing Olympics men’s singles event if both players live up to their billings. And that will be a dream come true for Chong Wei.
“I was 18 and was so excited to feature in my first international tournament. I played against Lin Dan for the first time and lost to him by one point ... it was so close,” said Chong Wei, who was then the country's top national junior.
“But I knew then, that this player (Lin Dan) will become the world's top player.”
Since then, the talented Lin Dan had taken the lead to dominate world badminton. In fact, the duo had met 12 times with Lin Dan winning eight of the matches.
But in their last encounter two months ago, Chong Wei showed that he had narrowed the gap by bulldozing past the Chinese in straight games in the first match of the Thomas Cup semi-final tie in Jakarta.
After putting such great effort in training, Chong Wei is determined to cap an eight-year rivalry by taking on Lin Dan in the final of the Beijing Games.
“Both of us have come very far since that first meeting (in 2000). Currently, he is the greatest men’s singles player in the world. Nothing will give me the pleasure but to play against him in the final. If this happens, it will be a dream come true,” said Chong Wei.
The 26-year-old added that both of them had their own specialties.
“He has grown into a great attacking player since our first meeting. He is powerful and his speed is amazing. And his skills are extraordinary. That is why he has been dominating the world scene for a long time,” said Chong Wei.
“I used to play a more defensive game. But now, there is more bite in my game. Since I followed coach Misbun (Sidek), I have become a more complete player.”
In his bid to make the final in Beijing, the second seeded Chong Wei is wary of the threat posed by the players in his half of the draw. He opens his campaign in the second round against Singapore’s Ronald Susilo. Both players drew first-round byes.
In his quarter are Indonesian Sony Dwi Kuncoro and Thailand's Boonsak Ponsana. The other quarter has China’s Bao Chunlai, Denmark's Kenneth Jonassen and South Korea's Lee Hyun-il.
Top seed Lin Dan has South Korean Park Sung-hwan, Dane Peter Gade-Christenten, compatriot Chen Jin, defending champion Taufik Hidayat of Indonesia and Malaysian Wong Choong Hann in his half of the draw.
After letting down Malaysia in last year’s World Championships where he lost in the third round to Sony, Chong Wei is determined to make up for the disappointment.
“I know that about 27 million Malaysians will be hoping for the badminton team to do well in the Olympics. My mission is to bring the cheers,” he said.

volcom
08-06-2008, 12:00 AM
Chong Wei hopes to topple Lin Dan and win a gold medal for fans

By RAJES PAUL

BADMINTON
VENUE: Beijing University of Technology Gymnasium COMPETITION DATES: Aug 9-17 MEDALS AT STAKE: 5-5-5
THE TEAM Men: Lee Chong Wei, Wong Choong Hann (singles); Koo Kien Keat-Tan Boon Heong, Lee Wan Wah-Choong Tan Fook (doubles) Women: Wong Mew Choo (singles); Chin Eei Hui-Wong Pei Tty (doubles) Manager: Datuk Lim Teong Kiat. Coaches: Yap Kim Hock, Misbun Sidek, Rexy Mainaky, Wong Tat Meng
PAST ACHIEVEMENTS 1992 Barcelona: Jalani-Razif Sidek (doubles, bronze) 1996 Atlanta: Yap Kim Hock-Cheah Soon Kit (doubles, silver); Rashid Sidek (singles, bronze) 2000 Sydney: No medals 2004 Athens: No medals
KUALA LUMPUR: It was eight years ago but national number one Lee Chong Wei still remembers vividly his first painful defeat by China's Lin Dan.
In his first international tournament, the 2000 Asian Junior Championships in Kyoto, Chong Wei lost by just one point to Lin Dan in the rubber game (15-8, 7-15, 17-16) in the quarter-final match. The Chinese went on to lift the title.
There will be another clash of titans between Lin Dan and Chong Wei in the final of the Beijing Olympics men’s singles event if both players live up to their billings. And that will be a dream come true for Chong Wei.
“I was 18 and was so excited to feature in my first international tournament. I played against Lin Dan for the first time and lost to him by one point ... it was so close,” said Chong Wei, who was then the country's top national junior.
“But I knew then, that this player (Lin Dan) will become the world's top player.”
Since then, the talented Lin Dan had taken the lead to dominate world badminton. In fact, the duo had met 12 times with Lin Dan winning eight of the matches.
But in their last encounter two months ago, Chong Wei showed that he had narrowed the gap by bulldozing past the Chinese in straight games in the first match of the Thomas Cup semi-final tie in Jakarta.
After putting such great effort in training, Chong Wei is determined to cap an eight-year rivalry by taking on Lin Dan in the final of the Beijing Games.
“Both of us have come very far since that first meeting (in 2000). Currently, he is the greatest men’s singles player in the world. Nothing will give me the pleasure but to play against him in the final. If this happens, it will be a dream come true,” said Chong Wei.
The 26-year-old added that both of them had their own specialties.
“He has grown into a great attacking player since our first meeting. He is powerful and his speed is amazing. And his skills are extraordinary. That is why he has been dominating the world scene for a long time,” said Chong Wei.
“I used to play a more defensive game. But now, there is more bite in my game. Since I followed coach Misbun (Sidek), I have become a more complete player.”
In his bid to make the final in Beijing, the second seeded Chong Wei is wary of the threat posed by the players in his half of the draw. He opens his campaign in the second round against Singapore’s Ronald Susilo. Both players drew first-round byes.
In his quarter are Indonesian Sony Dwi Kuncoro and Thailand's Boonsak Ponsana. The other quarter has China’s Bao Chunlai, Denmark's Kenneth Jonassen and South Korea's Lee Hyun-il.
Top seed Lin Dan has South Korean Park Sung-hwan, Dane Peter Gade-Christenten, compatriot Chen Jin, defending champion Taufik Hidayat of Indonesia and Malaysian Wong Choong Hann in his half of the draw.
After letting down Malaysia in last year’s World Championships where he lost in the third round to Sony, Chong Wei is determined to make up for the disappointment.
“I know that about 27 million Malaysians will be hoping for the badminton team to do well in the Olympics. My mission is to bring the cheers,” he said.
Good interview report :)

CLELY
08-06-2008, 01:26 AM
Olympic flame sets off on final relay

By HENRY SANDERSON, Associated Press Writer
11 minutes ago

The Olympic flame approached the final destination of its long and sometimes contentious global tour Wednesday, greeted by rapturous crowds in the Chinese capital two days before it officially launches the Summer Games.
The arrival of the torch marks one of the final steps in China's seven years of preparations for the games that have cost billions of dollars, and one which Beijing hopes will serve as the country's symbolic debut as a modern world power.
The torch will tour Beijing before ending up at Friday's opening ceremony for the games. It will be carried by a diverse group, including China's first astronaut in space Yang Liwei, movie director Zhang Yimou and basketball superstar Yao Ming.
"I'm very happy to be here," said Yang before the relay kicked off from the Forbidden City, home of Chinese emperors since the 15th century.
"That the torch is finally in Beijing is a realization of a dream we've had for a hundred years," Yang said, minutes before he took up the flame as its first torchbearer.
Basketball star Yao Ming carried the torch out of China's symbolic Tiananmen Gate, below the portrait of Chairman Mao.
Overseas, the torch relay was disrupted by protests or conducted under extremely heavy security since it left Greece on March 24, turning an event that should have built up excitement for the games into something of a public relations disaster for the hosts.
The protests have mostly been in response to China's crackdown in March on anti-government riots in Tibet and to more general concerns over human rights issues in China.
On Wednesday, a pro-Tibet group said police detained four activists after they unfurled banners outside the Beijing National Stadium, site of the opening ceremony.
Three men and one woman from Students for a Free Tibet climbed two electricity poles in front of the stadium, dubbed the Bird's Nest, and unfurled the two banners at dawn, said Lhadon Tethong, the New York-based group's executive director.
One banner said "Tibet will be free" and the other said "One World, One Dream" — the slogan for the Beijing Olympics — with the words "Free Tibet" in Chinese.
After an hour, fire trucks pulled up and the protesters were peacefully led away by police and members of the internal security force, Tethong said.
"We have not had any contact with them because their phones are off," she said.
Sun Weide, the spokesman for the Beijing Olympics organizing committee, did not answer his telephone. Zhao Min, from the Beijing Public Security Bureau spokesman's office, said officials were trying to confirm the incident and had no immediate comment.
The torch arrived back in the capital late Tuesday, after an emotional run in Sichuan province, the site of China's deadly May 12 earthquake which killed almost 70,000 people and left some 5 million homeless.
It was paraded Tuesday through about eight miles of the provincial capital of Chengdu. Hours later, a powerful aftershock struck other parts of Sichuan province in western China and nearby provinces, but it was not felt in Chengdu.
The original route of the torch in Chengdu was altered, taking it through an industrial part of the city rather than a more historic section that houses Tibetan communities, apparently out of concern that anti-government protests could mar the ceremony. Deadly riots against the Beijing government broke out in the capital of neighboring Tibet in March, and pro-Tibet activists have disrupted the torch relay overseas.

A huge stage was set up at the Forbidden City's Meridian Gate for lion dancers and other traditional dance performances. Despite the muggy heat, thousands of people lined Chang An Avenue, which runs through the heart of Beijing, to cheer on the torchbearers.
"I'm just so happy I couldn't sleep last night," said Liu Yuzhen, a 54-year-old retiree who was one of the dancers. "It's our torch and it's in Beijing. It's a chance of a hundred years and it's finally here."
From the Forbidden City, the torch was to pass landmarks such as the futuristic egg-shaped National Center for the Performing Arts and Tiananmen Square. The expansive square is iconic for its symbolism as the seat of the communist government, but also was the focus of pro-democracy demonstrations in 1989 that were violently crushed by security forces.
The crowd in Tiananmen square was small and strictly controlled in ordered lines as the torch wound its way around Mao's mausoleum. The only people allowed in were media and organized groups of supporters, mostly from major Olympic sponsors Lenovo and Coca-Cola, who shouted "Go China! Go Olympics!" and waved corporate flags.
"I feel the Olympics will help China develop, because China used to be so closed, and it gives an opportunity for the whole world to see China," said Weng Jianming, a 21-year old student at the Beijing University of Forestry.
He got up at 3 a.m. to be bused to the square but it was worth it to catch a glimpse of Yao Ming, he said.
The torch will end the day's relay at the Temple of Heaven in south Beijing, where the emperor went to perform sacrifices for a good harvest. The Beijing leg will involve 841 torchbearers over three days and will also visit the Great Wall at Badaling, a site where prehistoric fossils of Peking Man were discovered.
Security was tight along the torch run and Tiananmen Square was secured by armed police officers. The only people allowed onto the square were media and special guests.
Organizers have been on heightened alert since an attack in the country's restive Muslim region in the west killed 16 policemen on Monday.
On Tuesday, International Olympic Committee President Jacques Rogge said the committee was discussing whether to eliminate international relays. He said the IOC would retain its tradition of lighting the Olympic flame in Ancient Olympia and starting the torch relay in Greece, but may limit flame processions to domestic routes within Olympic host countries.

Associated Press writer Audra Ang contributed to this report from Beijing.

huangkwokhau
08-06-2008, 01:28 AM
I guess his vocal is so standard but yeah not bad. Just wondering whether the organizer will invite international top-singers to perform in Opening Ceremony or not.
Jacky Chan is not great singer....he is just so so...I hope they put Jacky Cheung instead....;);) my Idol....or Dao Lang/Dadawa

CLELY
08-06-2008, 01:51 AM
RI shuttlers set out to tame Chinese dragons

Primastuti Handayani , The Jakarta Post
Jakarta | Wed, 08/06/2008 10:23 AM | Sports

Indonesia has long relied on badminton to win gold medals at the Olympic Games.
This year is no exception. The question is whether our shuttlers can retain "the gold medal tradition" with many of them yet to give a convincing performance on the international stage.
Since badminton was first included in the Olympics in 1992, Indonesia has been winning gold medals in the event, with Susy Susanti and Alan Budikusuma taking out the women's and men's singles titles during the sport's debut year.
Men's doubles team Ricky Subagdja and Rexy Mainaky triumphed at the 1996 Atlanta Games, Candra Wijaya and Tony Gunawan won at the 2000 Sydney Olympics and Taufik took gold in the 2004 Athens Olympics.
Taufik is back, trying to recreate his winning form of four years ago. But his fitness remains in doubt as he is recovering from a fever.
"I think his condition is about 80 to 90 percent fit now," Badminton Association of Indonesia (PBSI) chairman Sutiyoso said.
"It's gonna be tough because he will face challenges from Lee Chong Wei of Malaysia and Lin Dan of China. It won't be easy for him."
Taufik, who is seeded seventh at the Olympics, has drawn Malaysia's Wong Choong Hann in the first round. If he can clear the first and second-round hurdles, the 26-year-old Indonesian is likely to challenge fourth seed Chen Jin of China.
He declined to comment on his chances, saying: "Let's wait and see."
Taufik has been in the spotlight because of his recent lackluster performance. His winning form was most recently seen at the Yonex-Sunrise Asian Continental Championships in April last year. This year, his best achievement was reaching the quarterfinals at the All England and Swiss Open.
Indonesia is also pinning its medal hopes on the mixed and men's doubles.
"I believe our shuttlers will do their best to win. Our best chances lie with the mixed or men's doubles events. However, there's a possibility we could steal a gold in the women's doubles," said Sutiyoso, who has promised a bonus of Rp 1 billion for any gold medalists.
For the mixed doubles, Indonesia is sending two-time world champions Nova Widiyanto and Lilyana Natsir and Asia champions Flandy Limpele and Vita Marissa.
Lilyana said although she would also play in the women's doubles with Vita, her main focus would be on the mixed doubles.
"Frankly speaking, we have a better chance in the mixed doubles," she said.
Vita agreed. "The draw shows that our pool is slightly lighter than the women's doubles."
But doubles coach Richard Mainaky warned his proteges not to be complacent about the draw. "They must bear in mind that the rally-point (scoring) system never gives any advantage to any players. They must stay alert."
Nova and Lilyana will meet Han Sang-hoon and Hwang Yu-mi of South Korea in the first round.
If they can get through, the top seeds are likely to face Sudket Prapakamol and Saralee Thoungthongkam of Thailand in the second round.
Third seeds Flandy and Vita will first take on Kristof Hopp and Birgit Overzier of Germany, with Thomas Laybourn and Kamilla Rytter of Denmark likely to be their next opponents.
In the women's doubles, Vita and Lilyana will challenge favorite Yang Wei-Zhang Jiewen of China in the first round at the Beijing University of Technology Gymnasium.
Despite coming up against top seeds and world champions, the Indonesians said they were by no means discouraged.
"It's the Olympics. It's different from regular tournaments," Vita said. "It's us against them."
The men's doubles are poised for tough tasks with top seeds and world champions Markis Kido and Hendra Setiawan of Indonesia up against China's second pair Gua Zhendong-Xie Zhongbo in the first round, and the second seeds, former world champions Cai Yun and Fu Haifeng of China, to meet Danish veterans Jens Eriksen and Martin Lundgaard Hansen.
Despite the tough trip to the next round, Kido was upbeat about his chances.
"We want to win," he said. "And we will."

samuel882
08-06-2008, 01:55 AM
Jacky Chan is not great singer....he is just so so...I hope they put Jacky Cheung instead....;);) my Idol....or Dao Lang/Dadawa
Yeah. Jacky Cheung is an awesome singer with great personality compare with Jacky Chan whose famous quote :" I am doing the wrong thing in which most of the guys will do....":o

samuel882
08-06-2008, 01:57 AM
untill 2012.. after that??
After That, Lion dance will be replacing Badminton at OG:p

CLELY
08-06-2008, 02:12 AM
Jacky Chan is not great singer....he is just so so...I hope they put Jacky Cheung instead....;);) my Idol....or Dao Lang/Dadawa

Yup, Jacky Cheung has great voice. Sun Nan who sings Forever Friends also good too. Hmmm, don't know about another Mandarin singers...

Oldhand
08-06-2008, 03:11 AM
I was told that this is Badminton's last time at the Olympics.. is this true?
Not true :)

I heard they were taking badminton out an chess is in..
Not true :)

I don't understand. Badminton is such an exciting sport. Why would they swap it with something like chess..i don't understand how chess can be classed as a sport to be honest :o
Edit: I Highly doubt it will happen though!
Um, who are 'they'? :rolleyes:

1 word: that is not true!!!
1 word?
george, 'That is not true' = 4 words :p

badminton will be an official olyimpic sport untill 2012.
Badminton is older than the modern Olympics :cool:
It will be around for much longer than the Olympics.

After That, Lion dance will be replacing Badminton at OG:p
To qualify as an Olympic discipline, a sport must be played by men in at least 50 countries on three continents, and by women in at least 35 countries on three continents. Since lions roam only two continents (Asia and Africa), Lion Dance does not qualify for inclusion :D

Those with further doubts could check out this thread (http://www.badmintoncentral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=53935) :)
It has answers in detail.

CLELY
08-06-2008, 03:35 AM
Opening Ceremony plan released

Updated: 2008-08-06 12:36:23
(BEIJING, August 6) -- With two days to go before the start of the Beijing Olympics, the organizers of the Games released the plan for the Opening Ceremony, which takes place on August 8.

The ceremony will start at 8:00 p.m. and will last about three and half hours, with China's Liu Huan and Sarah Brightman from Britain chosen to sing the theme song, said Zhang Heping, director of the BOCOG Opening and Closing Ceremonies Department at a press conference.

A 75-minute "pre-ceremony" performance that will end at 7:00 p.m. will feature folk and ethnic art from 28 teams across the country, Zhang said.

The core part of the ceremony -- the artistic performance -- will last one hour. It will be divided into two parts -- one to highlight China's age-old civilization and the other to highlight China's splendid modern era. The theme song will come at the end of the performance.

The post-performance part of the ceremony will last two and a half hours and comprises various Olympic rituals and traditions, including a declaration from Chinese President Hu Jintao opening the Games and a two-hour long parade of athletes. Delegations from 205 national and regional Olympic committees will enter the stadium according to the order of the simplified Chinese characters.

"The passion will be lighted on the night of August 8, offering the hundreds of thousands of spectators in the National Stadium, as well as hundreds of millions of people outside a spectacular performance," Zhang told the press.
-- source : the Official Website of Beijing 2008 OG --

*Unfortunately above news didn't mention the title of theme song that will be performed by Liu Huan and Sarah Brightman. Hmm, just remember about Sarah Brightman-Jose Carerras collaboration to sing beautiful theme song 'Amigos Para Siempre' (Friends for Life) in Barcelona 1992.

samuel882
08-06-2008, 03:36 AM
Kim Hock has to buy tickets to watch team in action
KUALA LUMPUR: Do not be surprised if you see Malaysian badminton head coach Yap Kim Hock sitting among the spectators during the competition at the Beijing Olympics next month.
With only a limited number of Olympic accreditation passes issued, Kim Hock has been forced to rely on tickets to get into the Beijing University of Technology Gymnasium, the venue for badminton from Aug 9-17.
Without the pass, he is also unable to enter the Athletes Village.
The Badminton Association of Malaysia (BAM) had initially received three passes for officials and these were given to Misbun Sidek, Wong Tat Meng and Rexy Mainaky.
Misbun is the coach for singles players Lee Chong Wei and Wong Mew Choo while Tat Meng is in charge of veteran Wong Choong Hann.
Rexy takes care of the doubles pairs – Koo Kien Keat-Tan Boon Heong and Choong Tan Fook-Lee Wan Wah (men) and Chin Eei Hui-Wong Pei Tty (women).
They later applied for an additional one and it was given to team manager Datuk Lim Teong Kiat.
Kim Hock said this would be the first major tournament where he would not get on-court access to the players during the Games.
“I was disappointed when I heard about this at first but that’s not a big problem for me. I accepted the fact that the accreditations for non-athletes are limited at the Olympics. I will be with the team during the few days of training sessions before the competition starts,” he said.
Kim Hock is not the only one affected. Physical trainer Sean Sturgess and Frederick Tan, the mental trainer for Chong Wei and Mew Choo, will also have to purchase tickets to get into the venue.
The Malaysian team, comprising nine shuttlers, will leave for Beijing on Aug 5 and may have to train at a different court if they are unable to get immediate access to the competition venue.
In Athens four years ago, Misbun and Kim Hock went as singles and doubles coaches respectively.
Rumours said that YAP will be demoted to Juniors doubles coach after Olympics.. Wish it was true:cool:

limsy
08-06-2008, 03:41 AM
Rumours said that YAP will be demoted to Juniors doubles coach after Olympics.. Wish it was true:cool:

why sam???...why u hope so???

eaglehelang
08-06-2008, 05:23 AM
Rumours said that YAP will be demoted to Juniors doubles coach after Olympics.. Wish it was true:cool:

Or that YKH will go elsewhere. And that Rashid or Rexy will be offered the chief coach post. Misbun was chief coach bf - during the 2004 OG me thinks, he knows how it's like, maybe that's why no rumors on Misbun being offered.:)

Read today's Berita Harian, got some more rumors abt Datuk Andrew Kam (KLRC owner) might be vying for the BAM President post to replace Datuk Nadzmi

huangkwokhau
08-06-2008, 08:51 AM
If Andrew Kam is BAM president...we may a chance to see US$ 1 Million tournament

ctjcad
08-06-2008, 09:33 AM
Opening Ceremony plan released
...
A 75-minute "pre-ceremony" performance that will end at 7:00 p.m. will feature folk and ethnic art from 28 teams across the country, Zhang said.
...
..talk about getting one's money's worth, that's indeed a long program (from basically 5:30 pm til 12 am)...:cool:

eaglehelang
08-06-2008, 10:00 AM
If Andrew Kam is BAM president...we may a chance to see US$ 1 Million tournament

http://www.bharian.com.my/Current_News/BH/Wednesday/Sukan/20080806070052/Article
Just rumors lah, the reporters so free while waiting for the action to start. The only thing Datuk Nazdmi had said earlier is he might not remain be BAM President after OG, but nothing is decided.

But if Rashid becomes chief coach, there'll be tighter countrol in MS, some heads will roll, some friciton will happen, Rashid is not Mr Nice Guy. Though he's not as bad tempered as Cheah SK.
From updates from you all, I doubt Rexy would want to be chief, more drama X10.;)

limsy
08-06-2008, 10:07 AM
http://www.bharian.com.my/Current_News/BH/Wednesday/Sukan/20080806070052/Article
Just rumors lah, the reporters so free while waiting for the action to start. The only thing Datuk Nazdmi had said earlier is he might not remain be BAM President after OG, but nothing is decided.

But if Rashid becomes chief coach, there'll be tighter countrol in MS, some heads will roll, some friciton will happen, Rashid is not Mr Nice Guy. Though he's not as bad tempered as Cheah SK.
From updates from you all, I doubt Rexy would want to be chief, more drama X10.;)

aiya...anyone that willing and can help mas do better in badminton can have it...^^...

Oldhand
08-06-2008, 12:58 PM
Please take the discussions on BAM and its fortunes elsewhere.
This thread is about news on the Beijing Olympics :)

george@chongwei
08-06-2008, 11:25 PM
History against Lin Dan winning the gold medal
http://thestar.com.my/archives/2008/8/7/sports/s_pg70lindan.jpg
WORLD number one Lin Dan (pic) will have to defy history if he is to follow in the footsteps of his former compatriot Ji Xinpeng in securing the Olympic men’s singles gold medal.
None of the top seeded players in the event has gone on to clinch the title in previous Games.
Zhao Jianhua was the top seed when badminton made its Olympic debut in Barcelona in 1992 and he was beaten by Indonesia's Hermawan Susanto in the quarter-finals. Another Indonesian, Allan Budi Kusuma, went on to bag the gold medal.
Four years later in Atlanta, Indonesian Joko Suprianto was given the top billing and he was beaten by Malaysia's Rashid Sidek in the quarter-finals.
Taufik Hidayat of Indonesia had a crack at Olympic glory as the top seed in Sydney 2000 but he went down to Xinpeng in the quarter-finals.
At the last Games in Athen, Taufik was unseeded but he went on to win the title. The top seed was Lin Dan but he was beaten by Singapore's Ronald Susilo in the second round.
Whether history will repeat itself is anybody's guess but Malaysian singles coach Misbun Sidek believed Lin Dan is good enough to go all the way to the title.
“He has been consistent throughout the year. He is always there among the top four finishers each time he competes although he skipped the Singapore and Indonesia Opens to prepare for Olympics,” he said.
“Lin Dan also knows that this is his best chance to bag the Olympic title. There are plenty of good players in China and he may not get the chance if he misses this time.
“The pressure is great but I think he has the experience to cope with it. The first round will be crucial and if he goes through well, his confidence will grow.”
Lin Dan, the winner of the Thailand and Swiss Open titles this year, has a first-round bye and will play against Hong Kong's Ng Wei for a place in the last 16.
But it gets tougher after that as he will probably go up against South Korean Park Sung-hwan. The Korean is one of the few players who have beaten Lin Dan before and the Chinese will be wise not to under-estimate his opponent.
Malaysia's Lee Chong Wei, seeded second in Beijing, is another player who has the potential to crush Lin Dan's hopes. But before the match can materialise, Lin Dan will have to come through from a half that has Taufik and his compatriot Chen Jin.

CLELY
08-07-2008, 01:51 AM
Lomong chosen as US flagbearer for Beijing Games

By EDDIE PELLS, AP National Writer
14 hours, 59 minutes ago

DALIAN, China (AP)—Eight years ago, Lopez Lomong didn’t even have a country. Now he’ll be carrying the flag for his adopted nation, leading the U.S Olympic team at opening ceremonies Friday night.
Lomong, one of the Lost Boys of Sudan, won a vote of team captains Wednesday to earn the honor of leading America’s contingent into the 90,000-seat Bird’s Nest Stadium.
The 1,500-meter track runner will be the flagbearer only 13 months after becoming a U.S. citizen.
“It’s more than a dream,” Lomong said in an interview with The Associated Press moments after he got the news. “I keep saying, I’m not sure if this is true or not true. I’m making the team and now I’m the first guy coming to the stadium and the whole world will be watching me carry the flag. There are no words to describe it.”
He was born in Sudan, separated from his parents at the point of a gun at age 6, and with the help of friends, he escaped confinement and made it to a refugee camp in Kenya. In 2001, he was brought to America as part of a program to relocate lost children from war-torn Sudan.
Earlier this week, the 23-year-old Lomong said he was mounting a campaign to be nominated by the track and field team for the flagbearer’s position. He said the honor would be memorable, but he also was thrilled to be part of the democratic process that might get him there.
“In America, everyone has a chance to do all these things,” Lomong said. “You follow the rules, people will choose, and if I’m blessed to get that opportunity, I’ll get it.”
In 2004, Dawn Staley did the flagbearer’s honors. In 2000, they went to kayaker Cliff Meidl, who survived a 30,000-volt jolt of electricity in a construction accident and became an Olympian.
Lomong’s story is every bit as inspiring.
He knew nothing of the Olympics in 2000, when his friends at the refugee camp in Kenya talked him into running five miles and paying five shillings to watch Michael Johnson on a black-and-white TV set with a fuzzy screen.
At that point, Lomong knew he wanted to be an Olympic runner. He earned his spot at Olympic trials on July 6, exactly one year after he gained his U.S. citizenship.
All three Americans in the 1,500 are naturalized citizens—Lomong, Bernard Lagat (Kenya) and Leo Manzano (Mexico)..
“I feel great,” Lomong said Wednesday night. “I feel happy, honored. I’m feeling so blessed to get an opportunity to present the United States of America, to present the United States flag in front of my team."
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Mark Foster to carry the flag

1 hours, 20 minutes ago
BEIJING (AFP) - Veteran swimmer Mark Foster will carry the flag at Friday's opening ceremony of the Beijing Olympics, the British Olympic Association (BOA) announced Thursday.
Foster, 38, is competing in his fifth Games having made his Olympic debut at Seoul in 1988.
But two years ago he announced his retirement from elite competition after finishing fourth in the 50 metres freestyle at the Commonwealth Games in Melbourne as injuries started to take their toll.
However, he changed his mind and he won the British 50m freestyle trials earlier this year to book his place in Beijing.
"I was blown away when I was told, it was a big surprise and a huge honour. It's fantastic," Foster, the the first swimmer to carry British flag at an Olympic opening ceremony since Anita Lonsborough in 1964 at Tokyo, told the BOA's official website.
"Some of the most wonderful names in British sport have been Olympic flag-bearers," added Foster, who succeeds judoka Kate Howey and multiple rowing gold medallists Matthew Pinsent and Steve Redgrave.
"I really wanted to be picked but I didn't totally believe I would be," he admitted. "My heart was pumping when the announcement was made.
"Making the Olympic Games this time around was fantastic in itself, but this has really topped it off. It's phenomenal."
Foster, a four-times world short course champion at 50m, when races are swum in a 25 metre pool, has a best Olympic placing of sixth in the 1992 Games in Barcelona.

george@chongwei
08-07-2008, 11:56 PM
Misbun happy to see shuttlers in relaxed mood ahead of battle

MALAYSIAN shuttlers are as recognisable as China’s own players. And they are always hounded by autograph hunters and fans at tournaments in China.
But the good news is that it’s the Olympics and the no-go zones set up makes them out of reach, even to the media, at times.
And it’s certainly working to the advantage of the players as they go through the training sessions leading to the start of the competition at the Beijing University of Technology Gymnasium.
The first round gets under way from tomorrow but Malaysian interest only begins the next day with the women’s doubles pair of Chin Eei Hui-Wong Pei Tty up against South Koreans Lee Hyo-jung-Lee Kyung-won for a place in the quarter-finals.
After three days of training, the players have found no problem with the competition venue.
http://thestar.com.my/archives/2008/8/8/sports/s_78wong.jpg Net play: Malaysian women’s singles shuttler Wong Mew Choo sparring with national men’s No. 1 Lee Chong Wei during a trainning session at the National Badminton Centre in Beijing on Thursday.
National singles coach Misbun Sidek who is in charge of medal hopefuls Lee Chong Wei and Wong Mew Choo, said that both of them are comfortable with the conditions.
“We have trained for one hour for the last three days since we got here and it’s what we expected of an Olympic venue,” said Misbun.
“The players are fine with the lighting but they can feel a bit of wind circulating around the court.
But these are things we should not be worried about.
“It’s normal and other players also face the same situation. An experienced player should know how to adjust to the situation.
“At this stage, the physical and tactical preparations are already done with. It is just a matter of getting them to remain in a calm and relaxed mood.”
And Misbun is pleased with the vibes he has been getting from his charges.
“The feeling is different once you are here and you can sense the competition getting nearer. The important thing is for them to stay relaxed and not get distracted at this point,” he said.
“There will be people who recognise them and want to be seen with them. I can see they are handling it well here off the court.”
Two courts were allocated to the Malaysian team for the one-hour session.
Chong Wei was seen sparring with men's doubles pair Choong Tan Fook-Lee Wan Wah on one court and he was replaced by Mew Choo later while Koo Kien Keat-Tan Boon Heong occupied the other court with Eei Hui-Pei Tty.

george@chongwei
08-07-2008, 11:57 PM
Magical ride ahead

THE Olympics. It’s the world’s biggest sporting event and there will be plenty of drama and magical moments recorded as the world’s best in their respective fields bid for glory for their nation and themselves.
And Malaysia will be waiting for success stories to be written in Beijing.
As I join the 14,000-strong accredited media from all over the globe in recording sport’s greatest drama unfolding after tonight’s opening ceremony, I would think that we are good for more than just one medal this time.
The hope is not just to see the first Malaysian Olympic champion but also the first medal won for the country outside badminton.
http://thestar.com.my/archives/2008/8/8/sports/s_78wong.jpg Net play: Malaysian women’s singles shuttler Wong Mew Choo sparring with national men’s No. 1 Lee Chong Wei during a trainning session at the National Badminton Centre in Beijing on Thursday.
Young track cyclist Azizul Hasni Awang has shown plenty of promise since he got himself noticed with a three-gold medal achievement in the junior ranks of the Asian Championships.
Azizul hails from the laid back town of Dungun and he is always a humble person, never failing to say thanks in our communication each time.
But there is nothing laid back about his approach when he lines up on the starting line, as proven when he beat the Japanese and Australian riders in their own backyard in competitions leading to the Olympics.
The 20-year-old will lead the nation out in the opening ceremony of the Games tonight and this honour will inspire him to ride like a champion in the velodrome.
And never discount Josiah, who was the toast of the nation in Athens four years ago when he overcame adversity to finish among the world’s best in the keirin event.
Josiah has improved but so has the competition. But what he has going for him is strong mental composure, something many of our Malaysian athletes always lack and the realisation that this should be his final shot at Olympic glory.
But our unassuming men’s archery team could beat the track cyclists to become the first non-badminton medal winners for the country.
The trio of Cheng Chu Sian, Mohd Marbawi Sulaiman and Wan Khalmizam Wan Abdul Aziz get into the fray at the archery range tomorrow for the decisive ranking round.
A good performance from the archers, who had a three-week-long stint in South Korea before arriving here, will go a long way to boosting self-confidence and better prospects at surviving the elimination rounds.
But it really boils down to their state of mind and how they handle themselves on the day.
And that goes for the badminton players, who have been tagged as the country’s best medal prospects since the sport made its debut in Barcelona in 1992.
Then, the Sidek brothers – Razif and Jalani – bagged the first Olympic medal for the country – a bronze.
In Atlanta four years later, the pair of Cheah Soon Kit-Yap Kim Hock brought in the silver and Rashid Sidek took the bronze. But the next two outings have seen the contingent coming home empty-handed.
The players carrying the hopes for a first-ever top podium finish for Malaysia this time are Lee Chong Wei and the doubles pairs of Koo Kien Keat-Tan Boon Heong and Choong Tan Fook-Lee Wan Wah. And Wong Mew Choo is seen as a good bet for a medal too.
Cracking the Great Wall of China may prove to be a daunting task, especially when they are the hosts this time. But our players have beaten the best in the world before in Open tournaments and they are certainly up to the task.
Singles coach Misbun Sidek has poured out his heart and soul into moulding a worthy gold medal contender in Chong Wei.
Who comes before him should not be the issue, as he has beaten all of them before. It is his mental ability and his hunger for glory that will determine whether he will get hold of the RM1mil reward promised by the government for a gold.
Chef-de-mission Datuk Ho Koh Chye summed it up best when he said how an athlete handles the pressure is what makes the difference between a good and a mediocre athlete.
This goes for our two men’s pairs – Kien Keat-Boon Heong and Wan Wah-Tan Fook.
Doubles coach Rexy Mainaky has been impressed by their conviction towards their cause in Beijing and if they can overcome their respective tough first round hurdles convincingly, a shot at Olympic history beckons.
But for the rest of the contingent, it will probably be all about soaking up the Olympic experience. Still, I would be glad to be proven wrong.
It gave me great pride to see Boon Heong-Kien Keat storm to the Asian Games gold medal in Doha two years ago. And I hope I will get to record another magical moment for Malaysia in Beijing.

george@chongwei
08-07-2008, 11:57 PM
World leaders gather for Olympics
Leaders and dignitaries from around the world are gathering in Beijing for the opening ceremony of the Olympic Games.
Some 11,000 athletes from 205 countries will compete in more than 300 events over the next two-and-a-half weeks.
But the lead-up to the Games has been overshadowed by issues such as China's human rights record, internet access, and air pollution in Beijing.
US President George W Bush expressed "deep concerns" over human rights before flying to Beijing.
Mr Bush, who was in Thailand on the eve of the opening ceremony, voiced "firm opposition" to China's detention of dissidents - while stressing that he wanted the focus during the Games to be on sport.
China rejected the US president's criticisms as "interference" in its internal affairs, and insisted it "put its people first".
Meanwhile, 40 Olympian athletes wrote to President Hu Jintao expressing their concerns over Beijing's handling of anti-Chinese unrest in Tibet.
Most expensive, most politicised
The 2008 Olympics have been described as the most politicised Games since the boycott era of the early 1980s, says the BBC's sports news reporter Alex Capstick in Beijing.






But after a succession of controversial issues in the build-up to the Games, the focus is now shifting to the opening ceremony.
Having taken seven years of planning, and a record-breaking $40bn in costs, nothing has been left to chance in China's bid to show the world what it can do, our correspondent adds.
An estimated global audience of four billion people will watch the opening ceremony.
It will be staged at Beijing's national stadium - known as the Bird's Nest because of its steel latticed construction - and some 10,000 performers will take part.
Jacques Rogge, the head of the International Olympic Committee, who has repeatedly defended the decision to let China host the Olympics, said he hoped the Games would help the world to understand China, and China to understand the world.
Mr Rogge also praised China's "extraordinary" efforts to cut pollution ahead of the Games, saying there was no danger to athletes' health.
Press freedom
A day before the Games, a BBC reading suggested Beijing's air quality was far below World Health Organization (WHO) standards.
It put levels of particulate matter (PM10) at 191 micrograms per cubic metre. This exceeds the WHO target for developing countries of 150 micrograms/cubic metre.
Mr Rogge said if the pollution was bad, events which lasted more than that could be shifted or postponed.
There were celebrations on Thursday as the Olympic torch made its final stops on a journey that has seen it pass through six continents in six months.
Patriotic crowds lining a mist-shrouded Great Wall cheered as the torch - which has been a magnet for protesters critical of China's rights record on its six-continent tour - passed by.
Human-rights group have condemned curbs on journalists covering the Games.
In a statement issued on Friday, the New York-based group Human Rights Watch said: "As the 2008 Olympic Games open in Beijing, foreign journalists in China face a host of severe restrictions, ranging from harassment to a censored internet."


Story from BBC NEWS:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/hi/asia-pacific/7548539.stm

CLELY
08-08-2008, 12:30 AM
Female badminton player, Daniel to bear Nigeria’s flag at opening ceremony Olympic Games

Thursday, Aug 7, 2008

Grace Daniel, Nigeria’s sole badminton entry in the 29th Olympic Games will carry the country’s flag during Friday’s opening ceremony.
A Team Nigeria official told the our correspondent in Beijing, that Daniel would lead her compatriots during the ceremony, to be watched by billions across the world.
“She was chosen by team officials for her exemplary behaviour,’’ the official told our our correspondent in Beijing on condition of anonymity.
He said the player, a beneficiary of the IOC Olympic Solidarity Scholarship, had shown through her character and disposition that she could be entrusted with bigger responsibilities.
“This is the hallmark of good athletes, those who will grow to become great leaders of tomorrow,’’ he said of the 24-year-old female.
Tidesports reports that Nigeria, which made its Olympic debut at the Helsinki Games in 1952, will take part in 10 sports at the Beijing Games and be fielding 87 athletes.
The sports are track and field, badminton, boxing, weightlifting, wrestling, table tennis, football, swimming, judo and taekwondo.
NAN gathered that about 7,000 of the 10,200 athletes attending the Games would be involved in the parade at the opening ceremony.
--The Tide Online (Nigeria)--

CLELY
08-08-2008, 12:39 AM
Indonesian shuttler urged to steal the show in Olympics

Primastuti Handayani , The Jakarta Post , Beijing | Fri, 08/08/2008 10:29 AM | Sports

Indonesian women's shuttler Maria Kristin hopes to get back onto the radar by qualifying at the women's singles badminton event at the 2008 Olympic Games. However, qualifying alone will not be enough for the shuttlers.
"Four years ago we didn't have any women's singles players at the Athens Olympics. When I first took the job to become the coach, I already said that our female shuttler will qualify for the Olympics. Now that Maria has qualified, I told her not to be satisfied only by competing at the Games," coach Hendrawan said Thursday, on the sidelines of a training session.
"I told Maria she should keep in mind to grab a medal in Beijing," said Hendrawan, who snatched a silver medal at the 2000 Sydney Olympics.
Indonesia won the women's singles gold medal in the 1992 Barcelona Olympics, thanks to living legend Susy Susanti. In 1996, Mia Audina, who later switched her citizenship to the Netherlands, grabbed the silver. She went on to win a silver for her new country in 2004. Since then, the national women's shuttlers have yet to excel at international level.
Team manager Lius Pongoh said Maria would stay out of the national squad during Friday's opening ceremony, as she would compete on Saturday. She will meet Julianne Schenk of Germany in the opening round.

Maria is upbeat about her prospects.
"I beat her (Schenk) during the 2004 Uber Cup championship. I gained a lot more confidence after competing in June's Indonesia Open where I reached the final and managed to defeat Olympic defending champion Zhang Ning," she said.
The absence of coach Marlev Mainaky, will not affect her performance. "I was trained by Hendrawan before Marlev took over. It's not a big deal."
Head coach Christian Hadinata said the national shuttlers would be ready for the challenge.

However, Indonesia is basing its medal hopes on the doubles.
The pairing of Nova Widiyanto and Lilyana Natsir, and of Markis Kido and Hendra Setiawan are tipped to liven up their status as top seeds in the mixed and men's doubles respectively.
"Our preparations have been good and the athletes are in good shape. They have already tried the courts and they'll be ready for the big day."
Among the country's 11 shuttlers is men's singles defending champion Taufik Hidayat, who just recovered from dengue fever. Although he is only the seventh seed here, the 26-year-old will be ready to have a shot at the gold, once again.
"I'm in good condition. I'll be ready for the match," he said.
Tough challenges, however, not only come from home star Lin Dan and Malaysia's hot favorite Lee Chong Wei, but from other players including compatriot Sony Dwi Kuncoro, who won this year's Indonesia Open.
"I just need to maintain Sony's motivation to win the gold, as his competition will start only two days after the opening," Hendrawan said.
Earlier in the day, the Malaysian team trained at the badminton venue -- the Beijing Technology University Gymnasium. The country's biggest hopes, Koo Kien Keat and Tan Boon Heong in the men's doubles, should be a threat to Markis and Hendra.
"Based on our results we have never lost to number one seeds before. We just plan to play our own game," Koo said.
Like Indonesia, Malaysia also sees badminton as the most likely sport where they have realistic hopes of going for gold.
"We are the only sport where Malaysians can hope for a gold medal. But I don't feel any pressure," Koo said.
The Malaysians will face Shintaro Ikeda and Shuichi Sakamoto of Japan in the first round.
"We have lost twice and won only once," Tan said. "But we don't want to think much about it, it doesn't help."
Coach Rexy Mainaky, who with Ricky Subagdja gave Indonesia Olympic gold in Athena 1996, praised his proteges, saying they were eager and fired up to win the first gold medal for Malaysia. "This pair is ready to deliver. It's all up to them now."
Speaking on the pressures on the pair, Ricky said: "I was three times a player and twice a coach (at the Olympics). I try to share with them. For two weeks now we have been in a positive mood. If they make mistakes, we try to encourage them positively."

CLELY
08-08-2008, 11:38 PM
Czech shooter wins games’ first gold

ByNOAH TRISTER, AP Sports Writer 14 minutes ago

BEIJING (AP)—Katerina Emmons spoiled China’s bid for the first gold medal of the Beijing Olympics on Saturday by winning the 10-meter air rifle for the Czech Republic.
Emmons, the wife of American shooter Matt Emmons, finished with an Olympic record of 503.5 points after shooting a perfect 400 in qualifying. Lioubov Galkina of Russia won the silver and Snjezana Pejcic of Croatia took the bronze.
The big surprise was a fifth-place finish by China’s Du Li. She won the event four years ago in Athens. Du was just a point behind Emmons after qualifying.
Du was greeted with a roar from the fans in the upper balcony of the shooting range when she came out for the final. She turned to face the crowd with a wide smile on her face, waved and bowed before heading over to her lane. However, she misfired immediately in the final round, scoring only 9.8 points on her first attempt, the worst shot of any of the eight finalists.
Competitors can earn up to 10.9 points per shot in the final.
Jamie Beyerle of Lebanon, Pa., finished fourth.
Emmons won by 1.4 points, a comfortable margin for the event. She entered the final shot all but assured of victory.
Of course, her husband was in a similar spot four years ago in the three-position rifle event. He missed out on a gold medal because he fired at the wrong target on the final shot—an unthinkable gaffe.
Matt Emmons did win a gold in prone rifle in Athens, and will compete in both prone and three-position rifle this year.
-----------
Congratz to Czech Republic! Local hope Du Li has huge pressure to perform best in front of her homesoil, disappointment for the host...

ctjcad
08-09-2008, 12:30 PM
...a tragic story, today, as mentioned in yahoo! news..:(

huangkwokhau
08-09-2008, 12:52 PM
...a tragic story, today, as mentioned in yahoo! news..:(
You mean..kin of US coach got killed, right?:(

ctjcad
08-09-2008, 12:53 PM
..not only the kin of the U.S. coach, but the story as a whole and what happened to the attacker..:(
*I'm afraid that tour site will be unavailable to the public for a while.:(

huangkwokhau
08-09-2008, 12:56 PM
..not only the kin of the U.S. coach, but the story as a whole and what happened to the attacker..:(
*I'm afraid that tour site will be unavailable to the public for a while.:(
Hm..whats that? tell me...

Oldhand
08-09-2008, 01:53 PM
The story is reported here (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/oly_china_american_killed) :o

Oldhand
08-09-2008, 01:57 PM
Father of former Olympian killed in Beijing

By BETH DUFF-BROWN
Associated Press Writer


BEIJING - The murder of the father of a former Olympian at a Beijing landmark cast a sad shadow over the first full day of Olympic competition Saturday, just hours after China's jubilant opening of the Summer Games.

Todd and Barbara Bachman of Lakeville, Minn. — parents of 2004 volleyball Olympian Elisabeth "Wiz" Bachman and in-laws of U.S. men's volleyball coach Hugh McCutcheon — were attacked by a Chinese man while visiting the 13th-century Drum Tower.

The U.S. Olympic Committee confirmed Bachman died from knife wounds and that Barbara Bachman suffered life-threatening injuries. She and their Chinese tour guide, who was also injured in the attack, were being treated in a Beijing hospital.

Elisabeth Bachman was with them at the time of the attack, but uninjured. Her father was chief executive officer for Bachman's, Inc., a home-and-garden center based in Minneapolis.

The assailant, Tang Yongming, 47, leapt to his death from a 130-foot (40-meter) -high balcony on the Drum Tower, just five miles (eight kilometers) from the main Olympics site, the official Xinhua News Agency reported.

The midday attack sent shock waves through the games precinct after the Olympics' spectacular opening ceremony had set an ebullient tone. President George W. Bush, in the Chinese capital for the games, expressed sadness while American athletes and Olympics officials reacted with disbelief.

There was no indication that the assailant knew that his victims had any connection to the games.

"For all intents, it appears to be a random attack by a deranged man," an American member of the International Olympic Committee, Jim Easton, told The Associated Press. "The only thing we've heard is they were not identifiable except for a small volleyball pin which would probably be invisible to a guy."

Easton said the attack has stunned the Olympic community.

"It's certainly a down day, certainly for the U.S. people," he said. "Here it is supposed to be a great time of happiness and peace and all that. That's what we work hard for, then for one person to be able to put a dark cloud on that."

The U.S. women's indoor volleyball team heard about the killing of their former teammate's father before they took on Japan in a match Saturday. After their victory, player Logan Tom was obviously shaken.

"God, we all love Wiz," she said. "It's hard to put it in words. That's not something that's supposed to happen."
Tom then turned away, crying.

"It's just tragic," said U.S. woman's basketball coach Anne Donovan. "I don't know if there's another word for it. We said a prayer for them in the locker room. I get goosebumps talking about it. It's something obviously that just changes the events right now for the Olympic Games."

Violent crime against foreigners is rare in tightly controlled China, and the assault at the Drum Tower, five miles from the main Olympics site, occurred despite major security measures that have blanketed the capital city during the Olympics: A 100,000-strong security force plus countless volunteer guards have been deployed to protect against any trouble.

Beijing's Communist leaders are hypersensitive about anything that could take the shine off the games. China's Foreign Ministry said it had no immediate comment on the attack. It was not mentioned in the main evening news bulletin on state-controlled television, though it was reported by the official Xinhua News Agency and other Chinese-language media.

Interpol said initial investigations found nothing indicating the murder was linked to terrorism or organized crime.

"So far, our database check and preliminary analysis suggest that today's murder-suicide was an isolated, though brutal, murder of one person and assault on two others," said Interpol Secretary General Ronald K. Noble.
Tang's name was run through computers containing more than 178,000 individuals, including 12,000 suspected terrorists, and came up blank. But Noble noted that the investigation was not complete.

Interpol said Tang had apparently recently divorced and had not been seen by relatives for two months.

U.S. Ambassador Clark T. Randt visited the victims in hospital, and the embassy issued a statement later that said the attack "appears to be a senseless act of violence."

"We don't believe this was targeted at American citizens, and we don't believe this has anything to do with the Olympics," embassy spokeswoman Susan Stevenson said.

Jennie Finch, a member of the U.S. softball team, said her heart skipped a beat when she heard about the attack, but was undaunted.

"I'm here with my husband and son, so it's not easy but we're living our dreams and we're not going to live in fear," she said. "We're going to go out there every day and enjoy every day and celebrate it."

Attacks on foreigners in China are extremely rare. A Canadian model was murdered last month in Shanghai — police said she stumbled onto a burglary. In March, a screaming, bomb-strapped hostage-taker who commandeered a bus with 10 Australians aboard in the popular tourist city of Xi'an was shot dead by a police sniper.

Shanghai and Beijing are still safer than most cities of their size. Punishments for crimes against foreigners are heavier than for crimes against Chinese, and police-linked neighborhood watch groups are highly vigilant. Chinese are not allowed to own guns. Still, the U.S. government has warned Americans against muggings, beatings and even carjackings, especially in the nightlife and shopping districts of large cities.

The Drum Tower is one of few ancient structures still in fast-developing Beijing. Long ago, drummers pounded their massive instruments on the hour to let people in the imperial city know the time. It is located on an important central axis of the city, to the north of the Forbidden City, which was home to the emperor.

huangkwokhau
08-09-2008, 02:03 PM
Hm..No more Drum Tower for Chris...it is nice place....

CLELY
08-12-2008, 01:51 AM
Yesterday (11 August 2008) was the most memorable day for India as this country grabbed gold medal for the first time in Olympic arena.

Family leads India’s celebrations of first gold

Aug 11, 4:54 am EDT
By Krittivas Mukherjee

NEW DELHI, Aug 11 (Reuters) - Abhinav Bindra’s mother joked that his Olympic triumph had made him “the country’s most eligible bachelor” as Indians celebrated a historic first individual gold medal.
Bindra’s family led the party after victory in the 10m air rifle event brought joy to a nation of more than one billion.
“He has won the greatest medal in the world,” an ecstatic A.S. Bindra, the shooter’s father told Reuters. Bindra senior is a successful businessman who has provided his son with an air-conditioned shooting range where he can train.
Neighbours and strangers streamed in and were offered sweets at the family home in the northern city of Chandigarh.

Babli Bindra, his mother, quipped: “Now I have lots of work ahead as he is the country’s most eligible bachelor.”
Already, the 25-year-old shooter’s female fan base is growing.
“Abhinav, will you marry me? My parents will have to buy that much less GOLD now,” read one congratulatory message posted by ‘Kaveri’ on the Reuters website.
The family held a special prayer session on Sunday and brought out a newspaper advertisement urging people to pray for their son.
Bindra’s victory eclipsed everything else on Indian TV channels which hailed it as a morale booster for a country with few global sporting stars.
People poured on to the streets in several cities, strangers hugged each other and exchanged sweets and congratulatory messages after the victory.
As the shooter fixed his gaze on the final target, the moment condensed the hopes of an entire nation starved of a solo Olympics gold.
He hit a near perfect 10.8 in a brilliant final shot to pull ahead of Henri Hakkinen of Finland, who stumbled in his last shot allowing China’s Zhu Qinan, the favourite, to take the silver.
India had only won four individual medals, none of them gold, since sending their first team to the Summer Games in 1928.
The Indian men’s hockey team have won the Olympic tournament eight times, but the last time was in 1980.
“We perhaps did not expect a gold and had long resigned to the fact that India performs poorly in the Games,” said Subir Mukherjee, a Kolkata resident.
Former Indian athletes stars hailed the victory, saying the gold will now spur the Indian team in the Beijing Games.
“It is a great achievement,” Vasudevan Baskaran, captain of the 1980 gold-winning hockey team told Reuters. “I’m thrilled, more than when we won our last gold medal.”
“It is important we won a gold medal at the early stages of the Games.” he said. “This will change the way our athletes perform whether it is shooting, archery, boxing or badminton.” (Additional reporting by Jatindra Dash, Geetinder Garewal, Sujoy Dhar and N. Ananthanarayanan; editing by Keith Weir)

morphy
08-12-2008, 06:25 PM
I feel bad for the other girl, Yang Peiyi. I hope the organizers recognize her by having her sing that song again in the Closing Ceremony...but somehow I'm not betting on that happening. And I don't think she's ugly...she looks like any normal 7 year old kid.

by Cam Cole, National Post
Published: Tuesday, August 12, 2008
Olympic girl seen but not heard
BEIJING -- The skies may be clearing up over Beijing, but the face China tried to paint on the 2008 Olympic Games is breaking out in blemishes.

Main Street of Happyville turns out to be a collection of expensively built facades, with nothing behind them. Or worse, something awful behind them: a series of very large lies -- and the worst of it is that the Chinese hosts don't even appear to realize how bad they may end up looking to the rest of the world.

The opening ceremony we all gushed over was not what it seemed. Those blazing footprints of fireworks that "walked" in the sky from Tiananmen Square to the Bird's Nest stadium? Pre-recorded and digitally inserted into the telecast.

The "sold-out" Olympic events, every ticket gone? An illusion, exposed only when reporters began to notice the squads of identically dressed and thunderstick-equipped cheer squads filling whole sections of seats. Even if some of those were seats designated for Olympic family members -- dignitaries and IOC members who leave seats unused at the lesser sessions is a chronic problem at all Games -- using fake fans to fill them is, at best, a comical notion and at worst an attempt to create a false picture of attendance.

Any minute now, we'll find out we're really in Japan.

But the piece de resistance, the most cynical of all of the pieces of fakery at the Beijing Olympics: Agence France-Presse revealed Tuesday that the darling little girl in a red dress who charmed the audience by singing Ode to the Motherland -- a hymn of the revolution -- during the ceremony wasn't singing at all.

Lin Miaoke was lip-synching to the voice of seven-year-old Yang Peiyi, who was rejected by a senior member of the Communist Party's politburo at a rehearsal because she had a chubby face and crooked teeth.

"He told us there was a problem, that we needed to fix it, so we did," said the ceremony's musical director, well-known contemporary composer Chen Qigang, in an interview with a state broadcaster that aired Tuesday.

AFP reported that the interview with Mr. Chen appeared briefly on the news website Sina.com before it was apparently wiped from the Internet in China.

"Little Yang Peiyi's failure to be selected was mainly because of her appearance," were among the Chen comments that were made to disappear. "The reason was for the national interest. The child on camera should be flawless in image, internal feelings and expression. Lin Miaoke is excellent in those aspects. But in terms of voice, Yang Peiyi is perfect, each member of our team agreed."

The French news agency interviewed the director of the China Internet project at the University of California-Berkeley, former dissident Xiao Qiang, who said the substitution of the pretty girl for the unsuitable one "illustrates an important aspect of these Olympic Games. It is all about projecting the right image of China with no respect for honesty or for the audience.

"I do not think the Chinese state realizes how unethical this is, they don't understand what kind of values they are reflecting."

Defenders of these "minor misdirections" say they are hardly unique to China, and the media is just picking on the hosts.

Didn't the late Pavarotti lip-synch his signature Nessun dorma aria from Turandot at the opening ceremony in Turin? Yes. But at least it was his own voice. Nobody said, "Listen, Luciano, you've kind of let yourself go, and there's not enough time for you to go on the South Beach diet. Julio Iglesias over here is still a good-looking man. We're going to have him lip-synch your song."

All kinds of artists lip-synch their performances. OK, we understand that.

And we got over the Internet censorship. We've accepted that there's certain things on the Net that the Chinese populace is not allowed to see. We accept that a 21-point censorship plan allegedly distributed to all state media probably exists, even if the spokesperson for Games organizing committee (BOCOG) claims to know nothing about it -- as he also knows nothing about plain-clothes officials reportedly shadowing some reporters, taking pictures of them, and notebooks being confiscated, or why two armoured personnel carriers suddenly appeared, parked outside the Media Centre, front and back, on Tuesday.

Fine. We're not supposed to know these things.

And maybe, in the larger sense, it's good that however bad the news is about the fakery surrounding the Games to date, at least the news is getting out. There was some question as to whether that would happen, before the Games began, and so far it has not been an issue.

So, China's defenders say, this is really no big deal.

And that's probably true, as long as you're not Yang Peiyi, who at seven years old has already discovered a hard truth about physical appearance - and had it drilled into her brain unequivocally, by her government no less, that she may be able to sing, but she's too ugly to represent her nation in public.

CLELY
08-13-2008, 02:41 AM
What a controversy that the organizer used lip-sync technic because 'good-looking' reason?! Bad impression and really disagree...

morphy
08-13-2008, 03:23 PM
Another article but on a lighter note and related to Badminton. It's written by Dave Perkins of the Toronto Star (biggest paper in Toronto) who normally writes about ice hockey, basketball,baseball basically all the major North American sports so I was pretty surprised to see an article on Badminton by a major publication much less one written by him. No doubt the popularity of the sport in China has alot to do with it and the focus is on Lin Dan - North American sports media tend to focus on the 'stars' and the sport second. The NBA is a good example.

Badminton player Lin Dan lights up Beijing
August 13, 2008
by
Dave Perkins
BEIJING

There may not be enough mustard for the hot dog that is badminton player Lin Dan. But what a show he and his sport put on.

To most locals, every night is badminton night at these Olympic Games and if popularity were strictly measured by ticket availability – of which there is none – then badminton is the No.1 show in town.

The fans know and love the game and in the Beijing University of Technology gymnasium, Lin clearly is the guy they love most. Not yet 25, he's the world's top-ranked player, he's engaged to marry the top-ranked woman – which makes him and Xie Xingfang the Posh and Becks of Chinese athletics, as it were – and he has enough of a rap sheet to earn the title of bad boy of badminton.

There are open suggestions he tanked a couple of matches to allow specific teammates to qualify here, plus reports – some of which he denies – that he has socked a coach or two, one of them his own. He got into it with a Korean coach early this year, threatening to take the racquet to the man's noodle, but he claimed to have been provoked and refused to apologize.

But he can sure play the game, this night dispatching game but outclassed Korean Sunghwan Park 21-8 and 21-10 in the round of 16, and he plays it with flair and plenty of fist-pumping, hollers and victory struts around the court.

He routinely strips off his shirt and flings it into the adoring customers. He plays to the crowd and they give it right back; he's the star of the show and that's saying something, considering the breathtaking speed and non-stop action that a three-court setup provides for fans who somehow seem to recognize and react to every flashing nuance of style and skill on all three courts.

Lin is 5-foot-10 and angular, which seems to be the overwhelmingly dominant body type among the players. He has a mini waterfall of thick hair that never stops flopping around, mostly because he doesn't.

He has that deceptive speed of many great athletes; he doesn't appear to be moving full-out, but when the shuttlecock arrives at a spot he tends to be there waiting, ready to return fire. He never hits a shot flat-footed and his vertical leap, when he goes up for a smash, is more than impressive.

It will be an upset of major proportions if he doesn't win the gold medal, although upsets are common. His court's preceding match has contained an upset of shocking (at least here) size; a Chinese mixed-doubles team blew a big lead and lost to a couple of jet-quick Brits in a three-game thriller. Even if you knew nothing about badminton minutiae, it was compelling sport, easy to appreciate.

"This isn't the biggest venue, but they really love the game here and appreciate it,'' said Anna Rice, the top Canadian who became the first North American woman to reach the singles round of 16 before being eliminated. "Here, Indonesia and Malaysia they really value the movements and tactics. Sometimes at this level we can make things look easy, but they all play it here, so they know how difficult it is to play.''

The game is well below the radar screen in North America, obviously, but Rice holds out hope, because of its entrenched popularity here.

"Everything Asian seems to be growing,'' she said, and she's right there. For one thing, badminton sure has the right kind of crowd-pleaser to be the front man.

Toronto Star

cooler
08-13-2008, 04:05 PM
i didnt watch the LD vs PSH match but i could understand why LD's is more 'expressive and emotional' in this match. We all know PSH is LD's nemesis so LD had taken extra effort to not only beat PSH but to chop down this tall korean like a tree ready for the chopstick mill... TIM...BERRRRRRRR:D. LD also has a debt to repay to those ~47% who voted against him in the PSH vd LD poll thread:D:p

http://www.badmintoncentral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=58385&highlight=PSH

morphy
08-13-2008, 05:26 PM
The closing statement in the article is especially true.
I'll probably ruffle a few feathers here but I think LD winning the gold will do more for the sport, Western countries in particular. Before anyone starts jumpin on my back I'm a LCW fan and hope he wins the gold for MAS but LD has that bad boy image and flair that appeals to the Western sportsworld.

Like him or hate him, I can't see anyone able to sell the sport like he can. If only there was a major tournament in NA that can pull the likes of him.

UkPlayer
08-14-2008, 03:12 AM
Found this UK commentary rather funny for the highlighted comment....

http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/606/A39480366



Nathan and Gail back with a bang

Wow - who would have thought so much fun could be had with a shuttlecock.

Gail Emms and Nathan Robertson, the stars of British badminton, became the first members of Team GB to truly silence a Chinese crowd with their astonishing comeback win over number two seeds Gao Ling and Zheng Bo.

If they'd have lost, the Athens silver medallists' Olympics would have been over at the first post, as well as Emms's career - she has said she will retire after Beijing. Instead, the whole draw has now opened up for them.

They did it in wonderful, gritty fashion, coming from 17-12 down in the final game (first to 21) to snatch a dramatic victory and on Thursday, they'll face unseeded Lee and Lee from Korea for a place in the semi-finals and the shot at a medal.

After unexpectedly gripping the nation four years ago, Robertson and Emms look set to do the same over the next few days.

There were turbulent emotions inside the Beijing University of Technology Gymnasium and the desertion of the crowd was as much a story as the match itself.

At the height of Britain's domination - 8-3 up in the second game having won the first - the crowd almost fell silent.

Then they spotted a lanky Danish player doing well on the adjacent court and they decided to cheer him for a bit.

At this point Zheng Bo, the weak link of the quartet for much of the match, was getting a verbal bashing from his experienced partner.

Gao Ling, a double gold medallist from Sydney and Athens, definitely wears the trousers in their relationship.

All of which left Robertson and Emms in a confident - therefore dangerous - position. Almost inevitably China started the comeback, levelling the match and taking a commanding lead in the decider.

They led 17-12 and, hardly surprisingly, the crowd were back onside. But Robertson in particular seemed to discover a second wind and the force of his smashes from midcourt, to win the two decisive points from 19-19, blew him over the finishing line.

We were live with commentary on 5Live on a breakthrough day, which also featured first-time commentaries on judo and canoe slalom.

This is what the Olympic Games is all about and it will feel a bit strange to watch millionaires shrug their shoulders at the concrete muddle of a tennis centre on Wednesday.


Peter Gade is the "Lanky Danish Player" :D

CLELY
08-14-2008, 03:43 AM
2 people die from crash near Olympic rowing venue

2 hours, 54 minutes ago
Two people involved in a crash near the Olympic rowing venue have died, the Beijing Olympic organizing committee said Thursday.

A bus from the athletes' village collided with a van Wednesday on the way to the Shunyi Olympic Rowing-Canoeing Park.
Committee spokesman Wang Wei said two of four van passengers died in a hospital.
"According to the investigation, the van was at fault and violated traffic rules," Wang said.
Two Croatian rowers, the doubles sculls team of Mario Vekic and Ante Kusurin, were on the bus but were not seriously injured. They competed later in the day and finished fourth in their semifinal.
Australian rowing team doctor Greg Lovell was also on the bus, along with several other Olympic-accredited people. No one on the bus was seriously injured.

-- taken from AP through Yahoo! News --

Oldhand
08-14-2008, 06:29 AM
Jamaican sprinter Asafa Powell says his chances for gold in the 100m are being sabotaged by, um, blood tests :rolleyes:

Ordinarily, this would take the cake for the most bizarre allegation... but then, Powell does seem to have a point. He has already been tested 4 times :eek: ... and it's not over yet!

As such, it's not surprising that Powell says 'they are taking too much blood' ;)

The news report can be accessed here (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/othersports/olympics/2546357/Sprinter-Asafa-Powell-weakened-by-Beijing-Olympic-blood-tests.html) :)

cooler
08-21-2008, 02:57 PM
OrlandoSentinel.com
Performers endure heatstroke, cramped quarters, long hours for Olympics ceremony
By GILLIAN WONG

Associated Press Writer

11:47 PM EDT, August 19, 2008

BEIJING (AP) _ Martial arts student Cheng Jianghua only saw the army barracks he stayed in and the stadium where he performed at the spectacular Olympics opening ceremony. But his sacrifices were minor — other performers were injured, fainted from heatstroke or forced to wear adult diapers so the show could go on.

Filmmaker Zhang Yimou, the ceremony's director, insisted in an interview with local media that suffering and sacrifice were required to pull off the Aug. 8 opening, which involved wrangling nearly 15,000 cast and crew. Only North Korea could have done it better, he said.

But some news reports have raised questions about the lengths to which Beijing went in trying to create a perfect start to the Summer Games.

Chinese officials were accused of fakery for using computer-generated images to enhance the show's fireworks display for TV viewers.

Organizers also have been criticized about their decision to have a 9-year-old girl lip-synch "Ode to the Motherland" because the real singer was deemed not cute enough.

Performers have complained that they sustained injuries from slipping during rain-drenched rehearsals or fainting from heatstroke amid hours of training under the relentless summer sun.

Cheng and 2,200 other carefully chosen pugilist prodigies spent an average of 16 hours a day, every day, rehearsing a synchronized tai-chi routine involving high kicks, sweeping lunges and swift punches. They lived for three months in trying conditions at a restricted army camp on the outskirts of Beijing.

"We never went out during the time we were training," Cheng, 20, told the AP in a phone interview. "Our school is quite strict. When we stay in school we can't go out on our own, let alone when we're at a military camp."

In the most extreme case, Beijing organizers revealed last week that Liu Yan, a 26-year-old dancer, was seriously injured during a July rehearsal. Shanghai media reported that she fell from a 10-foot stage and may be permanently paralyzed from the waist down.

Zhang, the ceremony's director, visited Liu in the hospital and has told Chinese media that he deeply regrets what happened to her — but he has also defended the training schedule his performers endured.

He told the popular Guangzhou weekly newspaper Southern Weekend that only communist North Korea could have done a better job getting thousands of performers to move in perfect unison.

"North Korea is No. 1 in the world when it comes to uniformity. They are uniform beyond belief! These kind of traditional synchronized movements result in a sense of beauty. We Chinese are able to achieve this as well. Through hard training and strict discipline," he said. Pyongyang's annual mass games feature 100,000 people moving in lockstep.

Performers in the West by contrast need frequent breaks and cannot withstand criticism, Zhang said, citing his experience working on an opera performance abroad. Though he didn't mention specific productions, Zhang directed Tan Dun's "The First Emperor," starring Placido Domingo, at New York's Metropolitan Opera in 2006.

"In one week, we could only work four and a half days, we had to have coffee breaks twice a day, couldn't go into overtime and just a little discomfort was not allowed because of human rights," he said of the unidentified opera production.

"You could not criticize them either. They all belong to some organizations ... they have all kind of institutions, unions. We do not have that. We can work very hard, can withstand lots of bitterness. We can achieve in one week what they can achieve in two months."

In the Olympic ceremony segment showcasing the Chinese invention of movable type, the nearly 900 performers who crouched under 40-pound boxes donned adult diapers to allow them to stay inside for at least six hours, Beijing organizers said.

Some students of the Shaolin Tagou Traditional Chinese Martial Arts School in Henan province who began training for the event last May were injured in falls on the LED screen that forms the floor on which they performed and was made slippery by rain, said Liu Haike, one of the school's lead instructors.

"At one point, the children had to run in four different directions. ... When one fell, others quickly followed," Liu said, adding the injuries were minor.

While in Beijing, the constant exposure to the dizzyingly hot summer resulted in heatstroke for some students, particularly during one rain-drenched rehearsal that stretched on for two days and two nights.

The students were kept on their feet for most of the 51-hour rehearsal with little food and rest and no shelter from the night's downpour, as the show's directors attempted to coordinate the 2,008-member performance with multimedia effects, students and their head coach told the AP.

"We had only two meals for the entire time. There was almost no time to sleep, even less time for toilet breaks," Cheng said. "But we didn't feel so angry because the director was also there with us the whole time."

Despite the sacrifices, the student performers were grateful for the opportunity to participate in the historic event and view it as an honor.

"All the tears, the sweat, and sometimes even blood that we shed, I now think it was quite worth it," said Ren Yang, 17, also of the Tagou school. "When we performed that night, all that I could feel in my heart was joy. Pure joy."



Copyright 2008 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

george@chongwei
08-25-2008, 11:34 PM
From Badzine...

:eek::mad:

POST OLYMPICS - Umpires complain (http://www.badzine.info/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=1238:post-olympics-umpires-complain&catid=8:international&Itemid=39)
http://www.badzine.info/images/stories/News_bzi/girish.natu_headlines.jpgIn spite of Chinese’s clear success during these Olympics, some Umpires have voiced their concerns about some pressure they had felt during the competition. India’s Economic Times of India reported that one of their international Umpires, Girish Natu, had been troubled by Chinese officials during the recent badminton event held in Beijing University of Technology.

by Badzine staff. Photo : Badmintonphoto

India’s Oympic Umpire Girish Natu (photo) has recently been quoted in one of his National Newspapers – Economic Times of India) about the behavior of Chinese officials during the competition : “Such incidents often occurred when Chinese players were playing non-Chinese opponents. We felt like we were being put to test all the time and Chinese were right. Li Yongbo, the coach of the Chinese badminton team refused to accept decisions that were given in favour of the non-Chinese opponents and created a hue-and-cry on the decisions” said Natu, a BWF certified umpire.

“I was not the only one put through the ‘test of being fair’, but several others also faced Yongbo’s,” Natu explains. According to Mr Natu, other umpires such as Hakan Fosto (Sweden, one of BWF’s certified umpires) - attending his fourth Olympics - and Japanese Tomoharu Sano.

“Yongbo once walked up to onto the court (playing area) and grabbing Fosto’s arm and threatened him, when he had ruled against the Chinese. He came up to me during the interval and threatened me to meet him first before I stepped out” added Natu.

This problem was voiced out amongst umpires during the event and the question had been raised during Umpire’s briefing on many occasions.
On the other end, all players and Umpires voiced their satisfaction towards the line judges, local and International ones, for what had been one of the main concern prior to the event.

Here is the link to the ETSunday Article (http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/Features/The_Sunday_ET/Games_People_Play/China_bullies_Badminton_coach_to_swing_the_results/articleshow/3397775.cms)

cooler
08-26-2008, 12:24 AM
From Badzine...

:eek::mad:

POST OLYMPICS - Umpires complain (http://www.badzine.info/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=1238:post-olympics-umpires-complain&catid=8:international&Itemid=39)
Here is the link to the ETSunday Article (http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/Features/The_Sunday_ET/Games_People_Play/China_bullies_Badminton_coach_to_swing_the_results/articleshow/3397775.cms)

the best solution is what was advocated in BF many times, employ video replay to resolve questionable calls. Umpire can make glaring mistake too. Fortunately i find line judging was pretty good at this OG. I think LYB want to talk to the service judge during the break because too many service faults were dished out. Unlike figure skating or gymnastic which outcome can be reversed if bad judging can be verified, it is very hard to reverse the badminton match result because of some bad calls occurred during the game. Persistent differences should be clarified and resolved at during the game if possible.
I think badminton is now too fast for umpire to see everything correctly, time to bring in some technological assistance.

For ex. the match between BCL and Cordon, 2nd set, at 10-10, Cordon made a net kill that was miraculously saved and returned by BCL but was called fault and point awarded to Cordon. Slow motion video clearly showed BCL did made that save legally. Chinese coach and bcl have protested but the ruling stayed. From then on, i think the chinese coaches lost trust in the umpires. Although i didn't watched every match in the OG, i didnt see chinese coach protesting any line calls maybe because line judging were fair overall.

pjswift
08-26-2008, 03:14 AM
the best solution is what was advocated in BF many times, employ video replay to resolve questionable calls. Umpire can make glaring mistake too. Fortunately i find line judging was pretty good at this OG. I think LYB want to talk to the service judge during the break because too many service faults were dished out. Unlike figure skating or gymnastic which outcome can be reversed if bad judging can be verified, it is very hard to reverse the badminton match result because of some bad calls occurred during the game. Persistent differences should be clarified and resolved at during the game if possible.
I think badminton is now too fast for umpire to see everything correctly, time to bring in some technological assistance.

For ex. the match between BCL and Cordon, 2nd set, at 10-10, Cordon made a net kill that was miraculously saved and returned by BCL but was called fault and point awarded to Cordon. Slow motion video clearly showed BCL did made that save legally. Chinese coach and bcl have protested but the ruling stayed. From then on, i think the chinese coaches lost trust in the umpires. Although i didn't watched every match in the OG, i didnt see chinese coach protesting any line calls maybe because line judging were fair overall.
LYB's the only coach trying to boss over umpires. Do you see LDS, the KOR WD coach ,getting involved when LKW got service fault calls?
I felt sorry for Hakan Foster(?);LYB touched him without his permission and he made a quick brush-off as if to say,'Don't taint me with your filth!'
Maybe LYB should quickly get an updated and correctly translated version of the service rules. Fu got faulted by 2 different sj (the other one in MDF). Cannot be because both disliked him.Otherwise Fu may be faulted in Europe SS next.
Maybe BWF should come up with a rule to prohibit coaches from interfering with officials.If they behave like LYB did during a match, then their players get penalised a point.

cooler
08-26-2008, 03:29 AM
LYB's the only coach trying to boss over umpires. Do you see LDS, the KOR WD coach ,getting involved when LKW got service fault calls?
I felt sorry for Hakan Foster(?);LYB touched him without his permission and he made a quick brush-off as if to say,'Don't taint me with your filth!'
Maybe LYB should quickly get an updated and correctly translated version of the service rules. Fu got faulted by 2 different sj (the other one in MDF). Cannot be because both disliked him.Otherwise Fu may be faulted in Europe SS next.
Maybe BWF should come up with a rule to prohibit coaches from interfering with officials.If they behave like LYB did during a match, then their players get penalised a point. yes, maybe bwf should since they're no rule on this matter LYB didn't broke the rule. If kakan foster feel that he is so offended by LYB's action, he shoulda log a complaint to the bwf and/or IOC. U seem to be the right person to petition the bwf on this matter. I'm sure everyone here don't like to see filth anywhere on the court.

ctjcad
08-26-2008, 07:57 AM
...
For ex. the match between BCL and Cordon, 2nd set, at 10-10, Cordon made a net kill that was miraculously saved and returned by BCL but was called fault and point awarded to Cordon. Slow motion video clearly showed BCL did made that save legally. Chinese coach and bcl have protested but the ruling stayed. From then on, i think the chinese coaches lost trust in the umpires. Although i didn't watched every match in the OG, i didnt see chinese coach protesting any line calls maybe because line judging were fair overall.
..while i was fortunate to witness the matches during 3 of the sessions, i noticed 3 bad calls were made also; the Cordon vs. BCL one was definitely a bad call. And if not mistaken all 3 of them to the CHN players.
Again, these happened only during the sessions i attended.

george@chongwei
08-27-2008, 12:02 AM
its really a shame seeing a head coach doing like that to the umpires...
threaten them..etc:(:(
haiz.

terry
08-27-2008, 12:26 AM
its really a shame seeing a head coach doing like that to the umpires...
threaten them..etc:(:(
haiz.

The coach should give life ban in badminton sport like the TAEKWANDO incident. :cool:

george@chongwei
08-27-2008, 08:23 AM
The coach should give life ban in badminton sport like the TAEKWANDO incident. :cool:
have to agree with this!:)

Oldhand
03-21-2009, 10:05 PM
Somehow I missed the later posts in this thread :o

Just to point out a couple of things:

The Swedish umpire's name is correctly Hakan Fosto.
Fosto, who has umpired at four Olympic Games, is one of the BWF's first certified umpires.

If Fosto had been manhandled or abused or intimidated by Li Yongbo, it's nothing short of shameful.

The weird thing is that Li Yongbo is also the chairman of the Technical Officials Committee (TOC), Asia, the committee that recommends umpires for future tournaments.

This is like a convict empowered to decide judges' appointments :(

Amin Khalili
04-03-2009, 12:15 PM
Somehow I missed the later posts in this thread :o

Just to point out a couple of things:

The Swedish umpire's name is correctly Hakan Fosto.
Fosto, who has umpired at four Olympic Games, is one of the BWF's first certified umpires.

If Fosto had been manhandled or abused or intimidated by Li Yongbo, it's nothing short of shameful.

The weird thing is that Li Yongbo is also the chairman of the Technical Officials Committee (TOC), Asia, the committee that recommends umpires for future tournaments.

This is like a convict empowered to decide judges' appointments :(
Me neither .... very very miss it!But time run so fast