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13.3.10 Dumb fault?

Discussion in 'Rules / Tournament Regulation / Officiating' started by jjashik, Feb 25, 2011.

  1. jjashik

    jjashik Regular Member

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    Rule 13.3.10 states:
    FAULTS
    It shall be a "fault":
    13.3.10 touches a player's racket and does not travel towards the opponent's court;

    and rule
    17.6 An umpire shall:
    17.6.1 uphold and enforce the Laws of Badminton and, especially, call a "fault" or a "let" should either occur;





    So the result is that on a shot like a missed smash return where the shuttle gets deflected (that is it keeps traveling away from the net), the umpire - HAS TO - call "Fault". Does this seem dumb to anyone else? Missed shots happen all the time, and if the shuttle fails to cross over into the opponent's court then it's just "out" - why the need to call "fault"? Unlike other situations of real fault (e.g. touching clothing or both doubles partners) where it may not be immediately obvious, the shuttle is clearly "OUT".

    The only situation that warrants a call by the umpire, I think, is where the player does touch it (either almost imperceptibly or unknowingly) and claims that the opponent's shot landed out. In which case the ump can call "touch" as in volleyball to confirm the contact.

    So at best, I think the rule to call out this "fault" is like launching a bazooka to kill a fly. Maybe it's just me, but I get annoyed by hearing "fault" when the player attempted shot goes the wrong way. Like a baseball umpire screaming safe when the batter steps on the plate after a homerun. No duh! NSS!
     
  2. Fidget

    Fidget Regular Member

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    The rule makes sense to me. For exactly the reason you stated: If there is a minute touch on a bird which subsequently lands out, if the umpire doesn't call the 'fault' immediately at the touch, then the player might argue that he never touched it and that the point should be his.

    Similarly in doubles, it makes it immediately clear that any attempted strike by the second player is out of play.
     
  3. chris-ccc

    chris-ccc Regular Member

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    'Fault' means 'The rally has ended with a point added to the score'

    .
    In the Laws of Badminton;

    * 'Fault' called by the umpire means 'The rally has ended with a point added to the score'
    * 'Let' called by the umpire means 'The rally is to be replayed (no point will be added to the score)'

    Usually line judges call 'Out' when the shuttlecock is hit out, but umpires can be heard calling 'Fault'.

    The line judges tell the umpire whether the shuttlecock is 'In' or 'Out'; The umpires tell the players whether a point will be added to the score or not.
    :):):)
    .
     
  4. Blisse

    Blisse Regular Member

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    Someone said it's so that if you hit it very high behind you, the point is not really over until the shuttle touches the floor. If the opponent touches the net, or any similar fault, while the shuttle is still in the air, then you could call that as a fault and claim the point. This stops that.
     
  5. chris-ccc

    chris-ccc Regular Member

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    Laws of Badminton (Section 13): Faults

    .
    There are many different 'Faults' that an umpire can call to add another point to the score.

    Check the Laws of Badminton (Section 13) relating to all the various 'Faults' that can be called (even when the shuttlecock is in the air).
    .
     
    #5 chris-ccc, Feb 25, 2011
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2011
  6. alexh

    alexh Regular Member

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    There are two different situations here:

    1. A missed shot where the shuttle travels towards the net. The shuttle is still in play until it hits the net or hits the ground, so the umpire shouldn't call "fault" in this situation. It's possible that an opponent might try to hit the shuttle, or otherwise commit a fault, before the point is over.

    2. A missed shot where the shuttle doesn't travel towards the net. In this case the point is over the instant the shuttle leaves the player's racket. Therefore the umpire should say "fault" to make it clear that the point has ended even before the shuttle hits the ground.

    Situation 2 doesn't actually happen all that often, so it's not such a nuisance.
     
  7. chris-ccc

    chris-ccc Regular Member

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    When should the umpire calls it a 'Fault'

    .
    IMHO, I cannot understand why the umpire should call "Fault" to make it clear that the point has ended even before the shuttle hits the ground.

    Why not call it a 'Fault' only after the shuttlecock has landed outside the court?
    :confused::confused::confused:
    .
     
  8. Fidget

    Fidget Regular Member

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    Chris,

    1) Think of doubles. If the front player barely grazes the shuttle and it continues behind him, the back player may think it was a complete miss and continue the rally by striking the bird over the net. Obviously the umpire must stop play at the instant of the fault.

    2) In singles. The player barely grazes the shuttle (or it brushes ever so lightly on his clothes) but he honestly doesn't realize it. The shuttle continues and lands 'out' past the back line. If the umpire didn't call the fault at the time of contact, then he has an argument on his hands about whose point it is.
     
  9. chris-ccc

    chris-ccc Regular Member

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    Rule 13.3.10

    .
    Thanks for your reply Fidget.

    Reading too fast, I completely missed the fact that the shuttlecock "touches a player's racket"; I was thinking too much on the fact that the shuttlecock "does not travel towards the opponent's court".
    :eek::eek::eek:
    .
     

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