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A Picture Can Say So Much.

Discussion in 'General Forum' started by wilfredlgf, Apr 2, 2004.

  1. wilfredlgf

    wilfredlgf Regular Member

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    Mag had his revelations, I had mine today. Different way but same result - good day in badminton!

    I found this picture while I was surfing the net and I downloaded, studied the person at the back. Can't make out which one was front, Zhang or Wei, but that's not important. The important thing I learnt from that photo was the posture :

    1. the approach in which uses the right leg to act as a sort of spring to send the body forward
    2. the use of the non-racquet arm for balance or targetting; I did the former
    3. the holding of the racquet upwards to prepare for the arm and wrist motion

    Being an average player with a consistency that rivals Hafiz's current form, studying the picture sort of helped a lot. I keep studying the player at the back until I could remember it so clearly. I even had the photo enlarged and printed so that I can see it without the computer.

    Of course I cannot follow it totally since I am a different player compared to them but, I can really say that by imitation, I have managed to learn how to make the body to rotate properly, transferring the power to the face of the racquet. Better still, I added some low leaps for better height and the result was something I never thought I could. Best of all however, was that I could do it consistently in all three games I played, and the results came out more or less the same - clean shots and more power than I usually produce using the old playing style (my own), most (around 25 out of 30) passed the net while a lot (maybe 10 out of 15) killed the serve or won the point. My opponent are made up of one decent player and one very good player, so I think I did quite well in respect of the kind of skill I am up against. I played doubles.

    The down side, although I felt like I did more 'beautiful' and correctly with lots of power into my shots, I felt a great dip in quality in drops. Almost all of it failed as it used to be my best weapon, with the shuttle falling some 10cm before the service line, often of reach. Anything to do with this 'newfound' knowledge?

    Also, I also feel more strain on the rib muscles when I do the full stretch to hit the ball when it's still high, having some soreness there. Perhaps I am not used to it or am I stretching too much?

    Sure, to the seasoned players here it's all part of a day at the work but for an average player like me who gets frustrated with deterioration in game, it's a major feel-good kinda thing that I was compelled to write about it.

    Thanks. ;)
     

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  2. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    It cannot be the Wei YiLi that used to partner Zhang JieWen.
    Wei YL is left handed.

    Drops are more difficult shots to perform - this is consistent with your observation.

    Perhaps you could let us what your usual technique is, then point out the differences.

    I wonder about that use of the nonracquet arm for targetting. It's not something I conciously think about. More it's like a reactionary movement from dropping the racquet arm back slightly on start of playing the overhead from the preparatory position.

    All in all though, you are getting the desired effect - more power with less effort. Sounds like you can play more frequently than twice a week, right?;) Slight anaemia does not harm anybody;)
     
  3. wood_22_chuck

    wood_22_chuck Regular Member

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    I find drops are hard to perform, as Cheung mentioned, because drops aren't about power. Most shots in doubles rally tend to be power drives, smashes and technique preparation is targetted at POWERING the birdie.

    With drops, you have to be disciplined in keeping form, otherwise you end up too lax, or relaxed.

    -dave
     
  4. Pete LSD

    Pete LSD Regular Member

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    Although the front lady is Asian, I think they are from the Danish team. They are using Forza racquets.
     
  5. blckknght

    blckknght Regular Member

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    indeed, neither one is wei yili either, she is left handed. looks like the Denmark Open too from the banner in the back
     
  6. wilfredlgf

    wilfredlgf Regular Member

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    My drops? I do it well if I apply no body rotation to it whatsoever ie the body remains in a sideways position after in which only the upper body moves. What I am keen to do, however, is to able to drop with the body moving the way it is as in the picture - sort of like making all the drops, clears and smashes look the same in motion, but different output. Now that will be very useful! ;)

    Well, Cheung, funny you should mention about that. Did a blood test last month and my Hb level had risen back to normal although it's at the bare minimum.

    All in all, everything seemed to be working out just fine... :)
     

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