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Advice - Badminton Racketu

Discussion in 'Badminton Rackets / Equipment' started by sraoo, Jun 29, 2012.

  1. sraoo

    sraoo Regular Member

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    Background information:
    I started playing badminton in Grade 7 during phys-ed. and started to practice at a local badminton club on a monthly basis until Grade 9 (present). At the start of high school, I joined the badminton team with my doubles partner and we placed 3rd overall - though, the competition wasn't too difficult. Recently, I have been going to my club 3 times a week (during junior times) to practice and train for next season. I assume my skill-level is above beginner, since I have to perfect my technique and strokes.

    After working for over a year, as a 15 year-old, I've saved up a decent amount of money. I also noticed from joining 'club badminton,' many junior members had quality rackets and I decided to purchase myself one. Since my city has few retailers, I found a Yonex Nanospeed 4500 for around $190 CAD (stringing included). The manager recommended 22 lbs. and ignorantly, I agreed. (I think my mature-appearance may have influenced his notion of my skill-level). However, after reading a few articles online, I've come to the conclusion high string-tension may restrict my ability and cause injury.

    Another detail is that during the summer, my parents friend travels to Malaysia (or some other country, I forget) and states they can purchase racket there for ~$50 which would normally cost ~$200 in Canada. With this opportunity, I can restring the racket with an appropriate tension and choose the racket of my choice, including: Nanospeed 9900, Arcsaber Z-Slash or Voltric models.

    Question:
    Should I return the racket and continue to play with my Wilson? And is 22 lbs. truly inappropriate for my skill-level?

    Any insight would be appreciated ;).
     
  2. yan.v

    yan.v Regular Member

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    22lbs is a bit high for starters playing with plastic shuttles. But if you feel you're still able to clear easily, it should be ok. If not, try a tension around 19-20lbs.

    The rackets that your parents' friends can buy are fakes. They are repainted low quality rackets.

    You should keep your NS4500 and just change the strings if you feel the tension is too high for you.
     
  3. sraoo

    sraoo Regular Member

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    Thanks! I play with mainly nylon, during junior times, however, I use feather with the seniors.

    Also, I assumed that the rackets are fake, but my parents reassured me that their friend is a serious badminton player, implying they wouldn't purchase counterfeits; I guess I will have to ask her myself.
     
  4. Fidget

    Fidget Regular Member

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    22 lb is fine (although many will tell you it's too loose!) Only you can decide if it's too stiff.

    $190 is awfully expensive for a mid-range Yonex. Even for Canada. (Unless you are in somewhere truly arctic like Pangnirtung where a single orange costs $3.50).

    If you truly have someone going to SE Asia, then you will certainly get more bang for your buck. But you have to have an idea of what specifications you prefer. There is no sense in getting a deal on a fancy world-class racket if doesn't suit your style.

    My advice: try out all your friends' fancy rackets and see if any of those feel any better than what you have now. If so get one. If not, keep your Wilson and save your money.
     
  5. yan.v

    yan.v Regular Member

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    I've had serious badminton players come to me with rackets from China before. Nanospeed 9900 and they assured me the racket was authentic, and that they bought it in China for 30$. It was 100% fake.

    If you ever see a racket listed for less than ~75% of the ongoing price in Canada, don't even ask yourself if it's fake or not, it's fake.

    If you play with both plastic and feather, I'd recommend stringing one racket at around 20 lbs for plastic and the other at around 24 lbs for feather.
     
  6. sraoo

    sraoo Regular Member

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    I forgot to mention the racket costed $169 and $190, including tax! And thanks for the advice, however, I feel the NS9900 or Voltric models may suit my style.
     
  7. sraoo

    sraoo Regular Member

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    Haha, thanks! I assume $50 dollars for a world-class racket doesn't seem right...Or maybe she is talking about a different brand other than Yonex, where fakes are less likely to appear.
     
  8. yan.v

    yan.v Regular Member

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    Yes, it's definitely possible to find cheaper rackets that are not Yonex but still good. For instance, Apacs low end rackets go for about 40$ and are very good for the price.

    As for the price you paid for the NS4500, it surprisingly seems to be the ongoing price.
     
  9. sraoo

    sraoo Regular Member

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    Is there a way to delete this thread? I feel I've shared quite a lot of information and I was worried I over-payed. However, I feel less anxious now about my purchase. Thank-you!
     
  10. yan.v

    yan.v Regular Member

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    Only moderators can delete threads. However there isn't really any reason to delete this one. Asking questions is fine :p
     
  11. BlueTornado

    BlueTornado Regular Member

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    Yes, as yan.v said, $169 is around the going price for a NS4500 in North America. Quite expensive but that's just how it is when buying Yonex.

    NS9900, Arc-Z, and Voltric models are all very different. Try out your friends' rackets to actually get a sense of what kind of specs you like. Right now it just seems like you're attracted the top-of-the-line, most highly marketed rackets which might not necessarily be the best for you. A good starting point might be a medium stiffness, even balanced to head heavy (but not overly so) racket such as the Voltric 70, ArcSaber 7, or the Victor Meteor X60.

    Agreed. Asian prices are cheaper but a $50 Yonex/Victor/Li-Ning/etc. high end racket is flat out going to be fake. The fact that your parent's friend is a serious badminton player honestly has no bearing on whether he/she will get a legit racket or not, unfortunately.

    As for the tension, 22 pounds shouldn't be a problem even with plastics. It is true that high stringing tension can be detrimental to one's playing ability and/or cause injury, but 22 pounds shouldn't really be too high. Of course YMMV, but when I started playing I strung at 24 pounds, and if there was some external factor that made me not play well, that wasn't it.
     
  12. Cillu

    Cillu Regular Member

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    I started at 22 pounds when I was a beginner and I was fine. If you feel as if you don't get enough power, then lower the tension and as your skill progresses, slowly raise it again.
     
  13. yan.v

    yan.v Regular Member

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    Did you all play with plastic shuttles at those tension ?

    I tend to find that anything above 23lbs is like hitting with a plywood board when playing with plastic shuttles. Add that to the fact that if my strings just explode past that with plastic :p

    With feather shuttles, I can handle 28lbs easily.
     
  14. SolsticeOfLight

    SolsticeOfLight Regular Member

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    I don't even use the same racket when I play with plastic (The one or two times each year :p ).
     
  15. BlueTornado

    BlueTornado Regular Member

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    Yup, plastic at 24. I can only really take up to about 25 with plastic, but with feather 28 is fine for me too. Somehow Mark A manages to play with ~30 on plastic, though.
     
  16. yan.v

    yan.v Regular Member

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    Wow I don't know how you guys do. Last time I tried 24 lbs on my Z Slash with plastic shuttles, the string bed just exploded. I broke at least 6 strings at the same time. Felt like LYD :p

    It was a mishit, but just off center, not really near the frame.
     
  17. SolsticeOfLight

    SolsticeOfLight Regular Member

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    The racket might have something to do with it too ...
    My feather racket is light super stiff slightly Head Heavy @ 9kg, and my plastic is light medium flex very head light @ 9.5kg.
     
  18. BlueTornado

    BlueTornado Regular Member

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    Dunno about Mark but not for me. I use everything I've got with both feather and plastic, from a 4U medium MX60 to a 2U x-stiff 8DX. :p
     
  19. sraoo

    sraoo Regular Member

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    Hm, should I return my NS4500 and purchase a VT70 for around the same price (excluding stringing)? The only issue is the site doesn't seem to offer shipping, however, the store is only an hr. away.

    Link:
    http://www.leesbadminton.ca/proshop-racquets.html
     
  20. yan.v

    yan.v Regular Member

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    We can't advise you to get a VT70 over NS4500. You may like the NS4500 better or the VT70, we don't know :p

    The VT70 is a more popular racket, but it doesn't mean that it's better for you.

    In order to recommend someone a racket, we need to know their play style, their experience, skill level, racket preferences, etc. And even if we know all of that, the racket we recommend may not even suit you well in the end.

    The best way to find a racket for you is to try many different rackets and take the one you like the best while you play. That may not be possible, but what you could do is play with your friends' rackets and get an idea of what you like. Then you can start searching for similar rackets on the market.

    Since you're not an advanced player, I would tell you to keep your racket (the NS4500 is a very good racket anyways) because you will probably not notice much difference between that racket and another one. Then, when you buy your next racket, you will have something to compare to and a good seller will be able to find a good racket for you based on your racket's characteristics and what you're trying to improve in your play.
     

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