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All Weather Commuter Bicycle

Discussion in 'Chit-Chat' started by Pete LSD, Aug 17, 2007.

  1. Pete LSD

    Pete LSD Regular Member

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    I am wondernig if there is a commuter bicycle that is all weather capable: the gears and chain aren't affected by rain and mud. I am looking for one that has lots of luggage carrying capability.

    What outfit do you experts recommend for the Great White North weather? It's always cold and rainy here in Vancouver.

    What brand of protective gears do you recommend for knees, elbows and head?
     
  2. silentheart

    silentheart Regular Member

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    Thank god you are not going to ride in snow.
    A good mountain bike ~$300-$400 will do.
    Why do you need luggage capacity? I can get you a backpack to carry racquet and accessary. May be a bag with 2 straps?
    2 things must. A wide seat so you will get circulation to you know where. A helmet to protect the head of future CPA. (Canadian Public Acct?)
     
  3. XtC-604

    XtC-604 Regular Member

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    there is one such vehicle...its called a CAR lol...ok but to be serious, i don't think you'll be wanting to ride your bike in Vancouver's weather...super wet, and the winters are torture even for cars, i suggest you grab yourself a monthly translink bus pass if you can't afford a car. But incase you wanna bike, try getting a good light mountain bike with wide wheels, and then put a messenger bag on the back of your bike.
     
  4. Pete LSD

    Pete LSD Regular Member

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    Well, school is just 40 minutes walk from home. Driving takes around 10 minutes.

    I need the luggage rake or space for holding very heavy textbooks.

    Oh, we have Certified General Accountants and Chartered Accountants in the GWN.

     
  5. silentheart

    silentheart Regular Member

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    Oh, OK. I thought you need a rack to carry a nice rack.:D
     
  6. Pete LSD

    Pete LSD Regular Member

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    Darn, you post faster than I can type!!! :D I would need a nice and comfy SUV for that purpose: rackmobile!

     
  7. silentheart

    silentheart Regular Member

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    No, you need a RV for that disco ball.
     
  8. sunofabeach

    sunofabeach Regular Member

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    wow, if you think the winters in Van City is bad, you should come live in Calgary or Saskatchewan for a couple winters :D
     
  9. Double_Player

    Double_Player Regular Member

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    well, all you need is helmet for protection. anything more and u'll look silly. you don't have to use helmet if you don't want to. and for vancouver rainy winter, get your self a good rain gear.

    as for bike choice, any mtb or hybrid bike with those rear rack attachment and bags are fine. I've bike in the winter (SNOW), all you need is dressed warmly and be smart. use the side walk when ever you can. police would look the other way most of the time.

    for gear and chain: buy a can of WD 40 from crappy tire and spray the chain, gears and any moving parts often during winter use.
     
  10. Griffinarts

    Griffinarts Regular Member

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    Hi Pete... don't forget the gloves, you'll find it out when you do an endo, shades for eye protection... try not to use DW 40 on the bike chain. a cyclist friend told me that at first it works fine, then you have to spray it more often and in increasingly large amounts... before you know it you a have a WD 40 junkie chain. There is a special grease/oil for the chain, ask your local bike shop for the one that'll suit the local weather. Always wear a helmet... Happy trails!

    Eric
     
  11. Double_Player

    Double_Player Regular Member

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    what endo?!? he's doing urban riding to commute from his apt/house to work/school/where ever. u don't jump park bench, do you?

    WD 40 is just for convinience. few quick spray and you're good to go. used motor oil is also OK, so is cooking oil (yeah, it's ghetto). special bike chain lube is over-rated. unless u got the spray type, they're awkward to use sometime if you want to properly lube your bike.
     
    #11 Double_Player, Aug 18, 2007
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2007
  12. Griffinarts

    Griffinarts Regular Member

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    Hi DP, Pete might find himself negotiating stairs... no park bench jumping, just awkward bunny hops... bike's too heavy for that... as foe brands, Rudy Project helmeta are cool...
     
  13. 2wheels04

    2wheels04 Regular Member

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    bike2work, work2live, live2bike

    When rain and snow is not an excuse for missing dates (school | main squeeze | work)

    Equipping your 2wheeler:
    Rims: use aluminium in lieu of steel, better grip when wet
    Brake-pads: run a rag to remove grime, esp just before you jump on the steed after a wet ride
    Cables: put a pinch-size glob of heavy-duty grease on top of cable-housing to reduce rusting of cables
    Wipe: frame (if steel) immediately after riding through salted roads; alternately bounce your bike a couple of times after riding through slush
    Chain-cover: Try Sidetrak (www.sidetrak.com, Seattle-area) for nylon chain-covers
    Chain-spray: Use the best lubes you can afford, and keep this transmission clean religiously (veggie oils oxidise and the gooey mess is hard to clean, wd-40 will remove the grease and you will have a chirping chain:()
    Tyres: use deeper tread for wet pavement (any brand works fine)
    Footsies: reduce cold toes by using fronts off old boots and attaching them to pedals


    General waterproofing / sealing
    Fenders: Look for thick-struts that are sturdier, mod them with beaver-tail (any used mouse-pad cut into triangular tail will work) for the front mud-guard a must to keep the spray off your chain and boots, rear optional for the back
    Feet: plastic bag over socks will keep them dry and warm
    Gloves: poagies made of rubberized material will keep your hands very warm even with a thin pair of liner gloves
    To make shoes or panniers waterproof use Aquaseal, Shoo-Goo, Welt-Seal or Nikwax
    For jacket or pants, use Scotch-Gard or NikWax for fabrics (browse the tent/seal section at MEC)
    Panniers: Ortlieb has rubberised ones (keeps the extra-pair of work-clothes very dry, and books too)

    Generally, it is much easier to keep the bike clean when there is permanent snow or frozen roads, such as what you find at the 65th parallel, unlike the NW rain-forests of Van/Vic (both being my favourite places for year-round two wheeling).

    If you need any other tips and techniques for riding over slick surfaces and in dodgy conditions, PM me.

    There is also a urban bike bible by David Glowacz who complied several low-tech and no-tech methods, called Urban Biker's Tricks & Tips (isbn 0-9651728-1-3), available from www.wordspacepress.com
     
    #13 2wheels04, Aug 18, 2007
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2007
  14. ph_leung

    ph_leung Regular Member

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    Good advice 2wheels04. Only a few things I'd add.

    If you can afford it and are planning on wet weather riding, disc brakes make a huge difference. When things get the road gets very wet, traditional rim brakes even with the best pads (Salmon Koolstops!) don't work anywhere as well as discs. When temperatures drop to wet-freezing and especially in snow, rim brakes are almost useless.

    Lights are important if you commute. At the minimum get a bright front white flashing LED and a read read flashing LED. Helmet mounted ones are good because they bring the lights higher so at intersections (stop sign controlled ones, approaching driveways for example), parked cars won't hide you from waiting cars. The helmet mounted flashing front light also allows you to turn you head toward drivers so you get noticed.

    If you wear glasses, get a helmet with a visor. For when it rains, you can make an extended visor. I've got a 1 1/2" velcro-attached extension (made from an 8" floppy disc) on mine and my glasses stay dry for my rainy 30 minute commutes.
     
  15. Pete LSD

    Pete LSD Regular Member

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    Thanks guys for your input!
     
  16. Ar Dan

    Ar Dan Regular Member

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    They have special lubes for the chain... WD40 and new/used motor oil are no good because a lot of dust will stick to it and it is a big mess if your clothing touches it.

    http://www.finishlineusa.com/products/
     
    #16 Ar Dan, Aug 24, 2007
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2007
  17. azn_123

    azn_123 Regular Member

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    Yup, your into bikes too ehh?? Disc Brakes are the way to go. You wouldn't need hydro disc brakes for a commuter bike, a mechanical disc brake should do the trick. And get a good lock with your bike.:)
     
  18. azn_123

    azn_123 Regular Member

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    Your smack on right, WD40 isn't a lubricate for bike chains. WD40=Solvent which works great for CLEANING the chain. If you have a dirty chain on your bike, just soak your chain in WD40 and wipe it clean.:D
     
  19. azn_123

    azn_123 Regular Member

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  20. azn_123

    azn_123 Regular Member

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