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Any OM-D users in the house?

Discussion in 'Badminton Photography' started by Maklike Tier, Nov 16, 2012.

  1. Maklike Tier

    Maklike Tier Regular Member

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    Thinking about getting into photography and am eyeing off the Olympus OM-D.

    Anyone had any luck shooting sports with it?
     
  2. bazzaman

    bazzaman Regular Member

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    I heard the om-d is fairly noise free with higher isos, for a micro 4/3. My GF3 isn't usable beyond iso-800 so no point even trying badminton shots. And you wont be taken any good pics with the kit lens for sure.

    So in short you want a decent sensor for low light and decent auto focus which isn't really possible for micro 4/3 atm.
     
  3. Maklike Tier

    Maklike Tier Regular Member

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    The sensor isn't a problem. From everything I've seen and read, it really gives a similar priced SLR a run for it's money, and generally from reviews I don't think I'd come up wanting in picture quality. Even if I do lose out slightly I make up for in versatility anyway, so it's a compromise I can live with for now as I think about a full DSLR sometime in the future.

    In terms of low light performance, I thought that was more of a lens factor? I know recently my friend had his 7D with him at a party with an f0.95 lens and it could basically shoot in the dark. What you could capture with your eye he could capture with that lens, so he was saying that shooting in lower light needs a better lens. He didn't know anything about M43 though, and I don't play badminton in the dark so I wasn't too worried :)

    Auto focus.....I hear mixed messages about the OM-D. It's auto focus seems ridiculously fast, but I don't understand how the two different focussing systems on cameras work, and why I couldn't make the OM-D's work for me. I know it can only manage 3fps with each frame individually focussed, and 8 frames using the focal point of the first frame, but aside form that I don't understand what the deal is.
     
  4. bazzaman

    bazzaman Regular Member

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    Low light performance is mostly limited by the sensor with micro 4/3 < APS-C < full frame. Best ask the pros on this board what ISOs they use. If they say 3200 then they're using full frame and you'll have no chance with the smaller sensors to get similar shots. Unless you are standing in their faces when you take the shots.

    I wouldn't gamble on a micro 4/3 taking decent indoor actions shots. In the right hands, maybe but far from optimal.
     
  5. Maklike Tier

    Maklike Tier Regular Member

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    Here's a comparo regarding the OM-D at higher ISO's. While it's not as good as a full framer, it certainly punches above it's weight, and that's something I'm constantly reading online.

    http://www.stevehuffphoto.com/2012/05/31/crazy-comparison-the-olympus-om-d-e-m5-vs-nikon-d800-for-high-iso/

    I agree it's not the best choice, but if you could only have one camera, it seems like a good choice. Although I can get a 650D with a reasonable lens for a similar price, so that's the real issue that I have I guess.
     
    #5 Maklike Tier, Nov 21, 2012
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2012
  6. kwun

    kwun Administrator

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    badminton indoor photos?

    ISO3200 if not ISO6400 is not uncommon in local gyms.

    in well lit competition halls (like China Open, HK Open), then maybe ISO1600->ISO3200.
     
  7. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    It's not the ISO performance you should be worrying about.

    It's the AF performance at low light that is important and which is never mentioned. Fast focus is all very well out in the daylight but indoors, with low light and lower contrast, is rarely commented upon. I would rate this feature above the ISO performance. An out of focus shot with low grain (with high ISO) is useless. Whereas an in focus shot with high grain can be used.

    HK Open this year is ISO 2000. The centre courts have brighter lighting; end courts are slightly dimmer. The old venue was dimmer by 1 stop. Looking back, I don't know how I managed to get the shots at ISO1600 and 1/320th of a second at the old venue.
     
    #7 Cheung, Nov 24, 2012
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2012
  8. Maklike Tier

    Maklike Tier Regular Member

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    Yeah, the contrast detection in good light seems to be good, but struggles in less than perfect conditions. I'm looking at the new Sony Nex6 now because it has a hybrid AF system with both contrast and phase detection.
     
  9. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    What I would say is anything less than DSLR is inadequate but it depends on your requirements. You hope the smaller systems can take badminton photos but you need to define what is acceptable for you. I.e. the compromise in quality. Don't be fooled by the marketing hype of the camera adverts. Badminton photos are very demanding of the equipment - fast moving subjects, low light conditions.

    I have found it better to stratify equipment to the functions. Have a small, light camera for casual use and a separate system for events. I'd rather have a small, light camera that can do all but it doesn't exist.
     
  10. Maklike Tier

    Maklike Tier Regular Member

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    I haven't read any marketing - only the online review sites. I know sport is the most demanding thing you can photograph, but I'm on a budget and love a challenge :)

    Well, don't get me wrong, if I had 10 grand I'd have probably three cameras and pick whatever body/lens combo was best suited for the job - an upper middle range DSLR with a 200mm lens for sport, an OMD for travel, and maybe an E-PM3 for pulling out at parties and events for informal shooting....but I don't have 10 grand. :)
     
  11. bazzaman

    bazzaman Regular Member

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    The Canon EOS 6D is supposed to be a good low light performer. Downside is only 11 auto focus points and no joystick like the 5D mk iii. Need some reviews to roll out first
     
  12. Maklike Tier

    Maklike Tier Regular Member

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    That's megabucks mate, well out of my price range. Models I'm looking at are the Nikon D300, Canon 550D, and Pentax K-5 and K-30. I'd love a Sigma 70-200 f2.8 EX HSM to stick on any of those, but I'm dreaming, really. :D
     
  13. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    as I mentioned, it goes back to what you think is acceptable quality.

    OM-D is pretty expensive as well for something that isn't going to get you good baddy photos. :) but if your primary aim is for general photo taking and travel photos first, then it is fine.
     
  14. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    Badminton on a budget I would say a second hand Canon 40D/50D and a 85/1.8 USM. I don't know what the Nikon equivalent is.
     
  15. jyeung

    jyeung Regular Member

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    Totally agree with this, especially when shooting with a wide open aperture for the shallow depth-of-field blurred backgroung effect! It is a tough balancing act between auto focus tracking, depth of field, amount of motion freeze, and noise! I think this is why I love doing this, the tougher the challenge, the more the satisfaction when some of the shots turn out good!
     
    #15 jyeung, Dec 1, 2012
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2012
  16. Maklike Tier

    Maklike Tier Regular Member

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    I'd rather get a 60D or a 550D. Whats the deal with that lens? 85mm prime?

    I think the 70-200 f2.8 USM would be the ultimate, yeah?
     
    #16 Maklike Tier, Dec 1, 2012
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2012
  17. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    Quite by coincidence, I had a conversation with a badminton person today talking about OM-D.

    As well as the above points, I explained for badminton, the size (i.e. area) of the AF focus point is important. Entry level DLSRs have a larger area for the focus point. When using a 350D, there were so many times when I got the focus point on the player, but on the computer, the subject was out of focus and on a higher contrast point (such as the top of the net or the Yonex board behind). The focus point area is actuallyarter than that shown in the camera viewfinder. That's why I don't advise entry level DSLR for badminton.
     
    #17 Cheung, Dec 2, 2012
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2012
  18. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    Yes, 70-200 2.8L Mark II would be a great lens. It depends on the location and the lighting. Today, I was at ISO3200, 1/640th and f2.0.

    If I was using the 70-200 f2.8L, I would have had to either drop the shutter speed or raise the ISO. I had to use primes.

    85/1.8 is relatively less expensive, focuses very quick and allows pictures in poorly lit gyms.
     
  19. razzmadazz

    razzmadazz Regular Member

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    I own a OMD, except I haven't used it for badminton purposes. But very good camera!!!!!!!!! I am a DSLR user and wanted something small for travel purposes, took it out of it's amazing box, had a few shots and could picture myself using the camera all the time. Just feels great in the hands.
     
  20. CBlack

    CBlack Regular Member

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    Hey hey...
    I'm late to this game.

    I picked up the E-M1 when it was first released.

    As my first foray into m4/3 it's been pretty interesting.

    I too am a traditional DSLR shooter, with a sizeable investment in the canikon ecosystems.

    Very good solid little cameras, and the image quality is surprisingly good.
    The shutter speed is awesome as is the FPS, though I'd recommend of course always renting the equipment to try before buying.
    I'd also recommend a fast memory card, if you decide to use the EM-1 for fast motion images, slower cards bogged down while saving for me.

    AF for my purposes, performed well.


    edit: Haven't used it for badminton, but have used it for other fast motion images.
    Will pick up the recently released lens (40-150mm f2.8) to give it a try around October.

    For comparison I did pick up the Fuji XT-1, Sony a7S, and Panasonic GH4 as I'm learning video, and working on a documentary project for charity.

    I'll post back some images for them when I have time to take some for badminton/sports.
     
    #20 CBlack, Jul 21, 2015
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2015

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