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Arcsabre 10 or Nanospeed

Discussion in 'Racket Recommendation / Comparison' started by GiantQ, Jun 10, 2012.

  1. GiantQ

    GiantQ Regular Member

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    Hi, need help to analyze which is a better racket for me.

    I am tall and lean and don't really had power for my play. I play twice a week and doubles most of the time.

    Lately trying to find a racket that suits me. I tot with a head heavy racket I can get more power. So I got a VTZF and its too heavy for me. THe heavy head gives me better control and good smash but my defense suffer a bit with the slower reaction and sore arm trying to handle the racket. The extra stiffness also gives me more pain than gain.

    So considering arcsabre10 or nanospeed9900. I am torn between the two. Why arcsabre is because I am a fan of PG and I always like his play. So try to mimic his style which resonate with my personal style. nanospeed 9900 is light and balanced. Which I feel can gives me a good pace for my play.

    ANyone tried the 2 rackets before to give me some pointers? and some qns for me to ponder which is better for me?
     
  2. TimothyHsu

    TimothyHsu Regular Member

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    I personally use the arc 10 because its a good all around racket. Nanospeed is too light for me and I feel like it doesn't generate the same power as the arc 10. It's good for defense but in my opinion, the best defense is a strong offense
     
  3. Avenger

    Avenger Regular Member

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    NS9900 is one of the stiffest racket around
    you should consider this point before choosing NS9900

    I would go for Victor BS10 actually
    slightly head heavy, stiff, and fast
     
  4. gundamzaku

    gundamzaku Regular Member

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    i do know how you feel about like peter gade because i like him a lot too, and i like lin dan a lot, but i know that i will never get as physically fit in badminton as they are. in general it's just whatever feels "good" in your hands. if you don't like the feel, you won't like your racket, and you won't like to play with it no matter how many pros use the same racket.
    i have arc10 in 2u and 3u, and the nano9900 as well. the arc10 is an even balance racket in general, and the nano9900 is a head light racket. in the beginning i wasn't able to generate too much power from the nano for some reason. but as i get use to the weight and focus on my form, i was able to generate more power. the progress is slow but it's wonderful that i can use a head light racket playing doubles yet able to generate power when i need.
    by the way, what racket are you using currently???
     
  5. GiantQ

    GiantQ Regular Member

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    I see. Understand a super stiff racket takes away some momentum when hitting the shuttles as it absorb some "swinging" action. So how does it compare between super stiff and stiff?

    Currently using a entry class Isometric aP, the PG version. Hehe. Thought of getting a new one since I use this for about 2 years already.
     
  6. balthazer

    balthazer Regular Member

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    I would recon you to try both. Loan from friends and try to do a couple of strokes and also defensive lifting. Its all depend to one's own feel and playing style. The Nanospeed racquets are quicker and feels faster when you swing but personally I felt like its lacking of force or power. Superb racquet for defensive and control playing style. While the Arcsaber series is an all rounder racquet which is perfect for all sort of playing style.

    What you need to look out for is the stiffness. Usually stiffer racquets are meant for people with better wrist power and control while flexible racquets goes the other way around.

    Like what Avenger said is true, if you were to pick the NS series, go for the NS7700 or NS 8000. The NS9900 is a very stiff racquet where not many players can really harnest the power of that racquet.

    My personal liking would be the Arcsaber series....especially the Arcsaber 7 :)
     
  7. GiantQ

    GiantQ Regular Member

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    After reading so many post, it dawn on me that the right racket is something that suits ur style rather than top range racket. Now I am opening to more racket. Important is the flex, it cant be stiff, I think flexible or medium for me, since i do not possess good wrist power.

    Head heavy will be out for me too. It will delay my response and defensive. Further, after trying VTZ, it indeed not my kind. Perhaps now i will look at NS6600 or AS7.
     
  8. wee1030

    wee1030 Regular Member

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    You could possibly consider bs10 or 11. They are fast swing like ns9900 and still preserved some good swing for smash at back court without demanding very intense arm.... XD ... Another point, it is cheaper compare to ns9900 or arc 10
     
  9. gundamzaku

    gundamzaku Regular Member

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    not sure if you can but check to see if you can still get older models but the muscle power series has great rackets that are flexible. i noticed the flex when i tried to do a quick clear and i could feel the racket head follow behind the handle, just a tad bit, but that's flex.
    i believe the arcsaber series is the replacement of the muscle power series but i feel that the arcsaber rackets are a bit more stiff, like medium stiff, as oppose to muscle power rackets which are medium flex.
     
  10. gundamzaku

    gundamzaku Regular Member

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    i have the muscle power 44,77,99,100, and tour, and all of them are pretty flexible. nanospeeds are generally more stiff than the older muscle power rackets. the 9900, 9000x, 9000s are the ones i have and they are pretty stiff to me, but because they're head light balance, my wrist was able to handle it playing doubles.
     
  11. GiantQ

    GiantQ Regular Member

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    BS10 and BS11 i see from the web they are pretty stiff too. I dont think I can handle a stiff racket at my current standard.

    Wow, I need to consider very long for a racket and looking at so many racket u have, i shld juz keep trying new rackets? haa, or maybe i shld get a 2nd hand one and try.
     
  12. TimothyHsu

    TimothyHsu Regular Member

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    Try a flex racket if you feel you have no power
     
  13. longley

    longley New Member

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    Hi GiantQ,
    Cause you have not describe your technique yet so I hesitate to share some my experience. Seem you & me have same shape, tall, lean & not much power.
    I used AS10 about 6 months but have to change NS9900 after that and I please it. With AS10, you need more technical, especially with backhand & defense because AS10 is not repulsion. Dont worry that N9900 is stiffer than AS10 because have differences between 2 kinds. Personal my idea N9900 & Ac10 same stiff. Dont think about N6600 when you need a flexible racket, I think some rackets as Armortec600, Armortec900T (4u)... are well to you.
     
  14. GiantQ

    GiantQ Regular Member

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    Thanks Longley. Still working on my technique. Will consider myself as a beginner at intermediate level haha. i tink AS10 won't be suitable for me due to its stiffness. NS9900 also. AS7 seems to be the choice i heading into. Heh, i think with poor power on the return, a flexible racket will e a better choice. But ideally should have 2 rackets to try out, then u will noe which is a better one.

    Read up on the stiffness relations with repulsion. simple to understand guide.

    http://www.how-to-play-badminton.com/badminton-racket.html
     
  15. sFrog

    sFrog Regular Member

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    I would try a Voltric 70, even though it's not my racket of choice. Good flex, not too demanding and fast.

    If the swing speed is not so fast yet, the NS or NR series from Yonex as the BS from Victor are the last ones I would try. They demand a high swing speed.
     
  16. balthazer

    balthazer Regular Member

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    I had the same racquet combo (used own a NS6600 and Arcs7), but after testing and comparing both of them for about a month, I sold off my NS6600 and got me another Arcs7 instead. Arcs7 feels more solid when you do a hard drives or smashes.
     
  17. AezranHakim

    AezranHakim Regular Member

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    ARC7, can never go wrong with that. hahah :)
     
  18. TheSmasherKing

    TheSmasherKing Regular Member

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    for me, i'll choose ns9900 :) right hakim ? :)
     
  19. AezranHakim

    AezranHakim Regular Member

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    Yes! Why I am so in love with the NS9900 racquet after trying more than 15 different racquets is that:
    As my wristwork is not strong, i can 'carry' and utilise it to the FULLEST.
    My game if needed to go to 3 rounds, the intensity i can carry is consistent.
    Consistent powerful smashes again and again and again. i can go steep or the other way round.
    Front of the court, my racquet swings fast.
    Defensive movement is better and more consistent.
    Accurate placements due to the stiff shaft.
    Its just so nice for me, i dont know why...

    *Take note i used to come from a head heavy racquet person, so if ur like me, getting the NS9900 might be abit hard to tame at first due to the timing difference, but patience is a virtue, once you can master it and use it to the fullest, it will do you wonders.... I used to and can carry head heavy racquets ie: AT700 being my most favourite but since i have stopped/slowed down my training sessions for almost 2/3 years, i cant maximise it anymore..

    I have since sold off my other racquets along the process like the vt80, at700, at900p lcw, vt70 NOT BECAUSE THEY ARE NOT GOOD BUT, BUT i MYSELF is unable to carry and utilise it to the FULLEST. the vt80 for me is one of the best racquets, but i know i cant utilise it 100% on the game so i have to make sacrifices... but at least i know its now with a good person :)
     
  20. NanoBatien

    NanoBatien Regular Member

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    I think the idea is to get the heaviest racket that you can maneuver easily and properly. So it has to be slightly too heavy when you are holding way back behind the handle, just ok when you are hold it mid-back (normal), and then really superfast light when you are holding up on the cone. This way during a game you can have the benefits of easy smash, but be able to hold up for net stuff.

    Then maybe to help your forearm wrist get stronger, you might want to increase the weight a tiny tiny bit. Too big and your technique goes out the window. This should be done after you have the correct technique.

    I see so many (not that well-built) beginners running around with VT80, and they will never get that nice efficient classy pointsmashing technique, and usually just end up with a well-honed flat panhandle gansta smash. Because even if they knew how to smash (and they dont), they wouldnt physically be able to do it. Technique is often just experimenting until you accidentally do it correctly, then remember that feeling and repeat it. An observant friend/coach can help, but its up to the player to develop that understanding themselves. Now with a too heavy racket, you will never find the right technique in 100 years of experimentation, since even if you do you cant physically execute it.

    The heavy rackets probably dont actually help all that much in smashing, since the heavier head usually results in slower swing speed. The actual good thing about heavier rackets is that they are more forgiving. If you stuff up the shot slightly, especially when you are caught out in a bad position, the heavier racket can be the difference between 3/4 court (a bit scared), and 1/2 court (oh sh*t i die).
     

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