Thanks for visiting us!

Badminton Central is a free community for fans of badminton! If you find anything useful here please consider registering to see more content and get involved with our great community users, it takes less than 15 seconds! Everybody is welcome here.

Click here for a FREE account!

At700/at800of/mp100/mp99

Discussion in 'Racket Recommendation / Comparison' started by Chire, Dec 17, 2005.

  1. Chire

    Chire Regular Member

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2005
    Messages:
    176
    Likes Received:
    2
    Occupation:
    soldier, conscript
    Location:
    Finnish Defence Forces (army)
    Yello!

    Yeah, time to decide on a new racket model. Even after reading a heavy load of threads (including every single one in the reviews section), I still need your help with this. Please point out a racket you'd recommend along with a reason of some sort (colour scheme doesn't count ;) ). Please include the weight level as well (2U,3U or 4U)

    I've played with AT500 (3UG3, BG-80 at 29 lbs) for the past ~4 months. Right off the bat, I find it way too flexible, there's no need for my racket to be as forgiving as this. On the other hand, its head-heaviness is exactly on the level to my liking. I like the way it gives me stability on the head while clearing, but I think it lacks control (its netplay is awesome though).

    I'm quite offensive, my play is based on offensive clears as well as smashes (quickly executed as well). Singles as main priority, doubles occasionally. I'm not concerned about the durability.

    I am looking for stiff and powerful rackets, head-heavy or balanced. Accuracy/stability while clearing is important. Please don't bother suggesting AT800 Defensive.

    I've no chance on testing any of these, hence my decision being up to your help. I have have no chance on getting models from the older series either (Cab, Ti) - Hereby, the rackets available for me:

    MP99 (2U or 3U)
    MP100 (3U)
    AT700 (3U or 4U)
    AT800 Offensive (3U)


    As of now, I find AT800 Offensive 3U or MP99 3U the options most to my liking due to its stiffness as well as it being less head-heavy than AT700
    I'm worried about AT700 3U's head-heaviness preventing me from executing quick shots round the head, as well as MP series' overall weight on 2U versions, experienced ones correct me on this.

    Any kind of opinion is appreciated,
    thanks in advance!
    -Chire
     
    #1 Chire, Dec 17, 2005
    Last edited: Dec 17, 2005
  2. Gollum

    Gollum Regular Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2003
    Messages:
    4,379
    Likes Received:
    46
    Location:
    Surrey, UK
    How refreshing! A request for help that actually includes some information ;)

    Mp100: personally, I hated this. Felt very head-heavy, slow, hard to time shots. Suspect too cumbersome for you.

    At700 (sorry, can't remember which U): agree with your concern here. I found this one too head-heavy, though less of a problem than Mp100. At500 is better than At700, in my opinion.

    At800-OF: haven't tried this. Seems to be intended for extreme bias towards offense. Personally I'd avoid such rackets in doubles (I know it's marketed as a doubles racket!), but they might be fine for singles.

    Mp99: even balance or slight head-heaviness. Excellent all-round racket, and my second choice for personal favourite. I tried the 3U, and I think it will be a better choice than 2U (too heavy).

    I think you may be dismissing the At800-DE unfairly. I know it's called "defensive", but that doesn't mean it's flexible or otherwise lame. In my experience, this racket is very similar to the Mp99. I had a hard time choosing between these two, but the At800-DE won for me. Extremely maneuverable racket, slightly head-heavy, reasonably stiff (but not as stiff as OF).

    Also, note that "forgiving" does not imply "for beginners" or "flexible".
     
  3. IvanM

    IvanM Regular Member

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2004
    Messages:
    117
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    HongKong, Currently in Brisbane
    MP99 (2U or 3U):
    I have been using MP99 (2UG4) for about 2 year, it is very all rounded, every aspect is great.
    MP100 (3U)
    I tried the 2U version, its stiffer than the MP99, and less forgiving
    AT700 (3U or 4U)
    I just bought AT 700 (4UG4) i found it kinda funny after playing with MP99 for 2 years. anyway, its stiffer, all of my shots are higher(placement) probably gonna take a while to adapt the weight
    AT800 Offensive (3U)
    No comment
     
  4. Chire

    Chire Regular Member

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2005
    Messages:
    176
    Likes Received:
    2
    Occupation:
    soldier, conscript
    Location:
    Finnish Defence Forces (army)
    Alrighty, some really notable advice you guys pointed out there, thanks!

    Well, the main reason AT800Def isn't under my consideration is that it equals MP99 so much, but its price is 45€ (£30) higher :( . Afterall, I will buy many of the rackets that my final decision eventually concerns.

    The reason why I particularly seek stiff rackets is that I've no problem hitting the sweetspot. I'm also somehow prejudiced that flexible rackets usually have less control while hitting from the back of the court :confused: . Stiff racket keeps me confidentAs for AT500, I've been trying to compensate its flexibility by stringing it to high tensions.

    Anyhow, Gollum, as you're experienced with both MP99 and AT800Def, which one do you consider more of a head-heavy racket? How about the difference in the overall feel?

    I'm under such an impression that MP99 practically has no weaknesses, overall performance being the top of Yonex models regardless of the style of one's play.

    IvanM, which one would you prefer powerwise, the MP99 2UG4 of yours or the AT700 4U?
     
  5. Gollum

    Gollum Regular Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2003
    Messages:
    4,379
    Likes Received:
    46
    Location:
    Surrey, UK
    That's a very good reason for not wanting to buy the At800-DE :)

    My last racket choice was between the Mp99 and the At800-DE. I loved the feel of both rackets.

    It was very hard for me to distinguish between them, except that the At800-DE felt more maneuverable (exceptionally so). I like a racket to "go where I put it", so that swung my decision in favour of the At800-DE.

    I think that the At800-DE is fractionally more head-heavy, but it's a close call. The Mp99, at 3U compared to the At800-DE 4U, is distinctly heavier overall.

    My feeling is that both rackets have no weaknesses and are at the top of Yonex's selection for overall performance.

    If you want the ultimate in quick response and maneuverability, then get the At800-DE. It's even faster than the Karakal SL-70 (world's lightest racket).

    I think that Mp99 has the edge on shots with a bigger swing -- smashes, clears, and some drives. It lets you put a little more weight behind your shots. The At800-DE is very light, and so probably not quite so powerful on these shots. But the At800-DE excels at shorter, sharper shots: net kills, smash defence, and some drives. If you use finger power to hit with an extremely short racket swing, then the At800-DE outperforms heavier rackets on these shots.

    Bearing in mind that your main interest is singles, I'd say go with the Mp99. In singles, the At800-DE's strengths are less useful. Besides, the Mp99 is cheaper.

    I can't recommend these two rackets enough. They are both, in my view, superbly balanced tools. The differences between them are subtle.
     
  6. Froca

    Froca Regular Member

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2005
    Messages:
    110
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    student( must keep a high avg to play badminton an
    Location:
    Canada, Ontario, Markham
    well since AT700 is one of the choice, i'd also like to ask some question about it.

    Which weight is better? 4u or 3u?

    judging by performance 1 st
    -power
    -control
    -manuverbility

    Durability 2nd


    thnx i advance
     
  7. IvanM

    IvanM Regular Member

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2004
    Messages:
    117
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    HongKong, Currently in Brisbane
    If i were to choose
    i would still prefer Mp99
    since it has no weaknesses

    My at700 is kinda...lack of control
    since the weight of it and the head-heaviness is very extreme

    :D:D:DGo MP99
     
  8. DinkAlot

    DinkAlot dcbadminton
    Brand Representative

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2005
    Messages:
    12,457
    Likes Received:
    68
    Occupation:
    www.dcbadminton.net
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    Agree, if I were to buy a Yonex racket to play with, right now, it would be the AT800-DE. IMHO, it's the most underrated racket in recent memory. :p
     
  9. franxon

    franxon Regular Member

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2005
    Messages:
    182
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Singapore
    choose the pros' choice

    the best way to decide a racket is to try all the candidates out, not for a few hours but for two or three weeks of play. don't easily condemn a racket. more likely than not, if you were to get all four of them, and to use each one for a month, you would fall in love with at least 2 or 3, if not all of them. they all are good rackets and i bet many people can find more than one right answer from the four.

    another good way (i think) is to check out this site: http://www.yonex.co.jp/intl/badminton/player/index.html, choose the pros' choice. if the player's style is similar to yours, then his choice might work for you too. personally i recommend MP100 and AT700.

    btw, for those who think NS8000 does not smash as hard as ATs and MPs, please check out what Haward Bach used in the 2005 IBF world championships, who is nothing but a good smasher and server.
     
  10. Gollum

    Gollum Regular Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2003
    Messages:
    4,379
    Likes Received:
    46
    Location:
    Surrey, UK
    I don't think that is a good idea.

    It's too tempting to pretend that "My style is like Tony Gunawan" or "Me, I play more like Kim Dong Moon".

    Bollocks. None of us plays like any pro. Not even slightly. Choosing a racket in this way will be unreliable, because it relies on a fanciful comparison.

    (Exceptions, of course, for the very few resident pros here!)

    Your other suggestion is much better:

     
  11. DinkAlot

    DinkAlot dcbadminton
    Brand Representative

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2005
    Messages:
    12,457
    Likes Received:
    68
    Occupation:
    www.dcbadminton.net
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    Sorry, completely disagree. Howard Bach is a pro. Pros can smash with any racket. 99.99% of the people on BC are not pros and we play nothing like the Pros. Using pros is a terrible example.
     
  12. franxon

    franxon Regular Member

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2005
    Messages:
    182
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Singapore
    no problem, pros can smash harder than i do with a wood racquet or a tennis racquet. i have no doubt about that.

    but are you suggesting different rackets make no difference in pros' hands? i think some rackets give pros more smashing power than other rackets, this is as applicable as the rackets to us (maybe not the same rackets though).

    and what i'm trying to say here is that NS8000 is one of the 'some rackets' (whose performance some smashing pros are happy with) rather than one of 'other rackets' in a pro's hand.

    if someone, pro or not, can not smash hard with a certain racket, it can either be because: the racket is not designed for hard smashing, or, this someone doesn't know how to smash hard with the racket.

    if someone draws a conclusion that NS8000 is not a smashing design (statements alike can be easily found in the forum), one otherwise example can prove him wrong, it doesn't matter where the example comes from, as long as it's a fact.
     
    #12 franxon, Dec 22, 2005
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2005
  13. franxon

    franxon Regular Member

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2005
    Messages:
    182
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Singapore
    it's alright if you disagree. but make sure you have got what i'm trying to say. lemme rephrase it:

    if you are a hard smasher, choose the pro hard smashers' choices, it won't be too wrong. it might not be the best choice for you, but definitely a safe bet, at least safer than a purchase purely based on the reviews from the crowd.

    this is certainly not the best way to choose your racket, needless to say. i'm suggesting so because Chire can't try any one before he buy it. suggestions like 'try out first' simply doesn't apply to him. any better ideas care to share?

    and, it's nothing wrong to have a pro target whose style you think suits you most. there's a lot we can learn from the pros. and i'm wondering who doesn't want to learn from them. it is not equivalent to imitating every movement the pros execute.

    similarly, it's nothing wrong to think your play style is more like Taufik than Wong Choong Hann. no matter how far away, you still can be closer to Taufik than Wong Choong Hann.
     
  14. DinkAlot

    DinkAlot dcbadminton
    Brand Representative

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2005
    Messages:
    12,457
    Likes Received:
    68
    Occupation:
    www.dcbadminton.net
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    Of course there is a difference. :p But the pros are paid to use certain rackets in the line-up...and it's not all about smashing for the pros.

    For instance, my coach cares more about feel and speed. He used to use an MP99 and hit significantly harder. Then he switched to an NS7000 and his shots were no longer as powerful. But he didn't care, he cared about how the racket felt and the additional speed he gained.

    If each pro cared most about smashing power, they would use an extreme head heavy racket with lower tension. But this is not the case as we know most players go 28lbs. and up.
     
  15. GunBlade008

    GunBlade008 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2005
    Messages:
    773
    Likes Received:
    1
    Occupation:
    Student, Retail.
    Location:
    Toronto
    Though I am very very biased, I suggest the 3U/4U AT700 or AT800. AT700 more so because I've never actually tried the AT800.

    Well, Lin Dan has a great hard smash and he plays with the AT700, whereas Fu Hai Feng has the hardest/fastest smash in the world and plays with Ti-10. If we followed your logic, then no one would buy AT700 because the fastest smasher in the world plays Ti-10. Another point, they are professionals. Most of us in here are nowhere near their skill level, so a review from other people here, (not pros) are much better as we can relate to one another. And plus if Chire were not an adapt player, and asked which racquet to use as a beginner, would anyone here suggest an MP100 because its the most powerful racquet? I think not.
     
    #15 GunBlade008, Dec 22, 2005
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2005
  16. franxon

    franxon Regular Member

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2005
    Messages:
    182
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Singapore
    well, as far as i know, chinese national players are NOT paid to use certain models. they gotta choose from Yonex, but which racquet is purely up to themselves. i can't say the same thing for other Yonex sponsored pros though.

    Pros do choose racquets carefully. many factors than smashing power need to consider. that is needless to say. while I'm not saying here that the hard smashers choose racquets that can let them smash the hardest. but that the hard smashers' choices give them satisfacotry smashing performance.

    to exploit my example a bit further, take your coach for example, let's say he's a pro and he's a hard smasher, and he chooses NS7000.

    the conclusion my logic can give you here is NOT that NS7000 is the racket your coach can smash the hardest with, but that NS7000 is a racquet that a pro hard smasher is happy with. so my way doesn't guarantee you find the racquet that suits you best, but a safe enough choice.

    and once again, i suggest so only because Chire doesn't have a chance to try the racquets he wants to buy. i personally think this is a safer way than purchase based on reviews from the crowd. and these are all relatively speaking.
     
  17. rodistyle

    rodistyle New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2004
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    student
    Location:
    calgary
    i have an armortec 800de 4U G4 and i use it mainly for singles. it's probably the most amazing racquet ive ever used. the control is absolutely unbelievable, one that is un-matched by any raquet. drops, net kills, net shots and receiving smashs are done almost effortlessly. the only negative is that the smashing is not very strong. compared to racquets like at700, mp99 or ns8000, the at800de can't compare.

    im very interseted in getting an at700, and i was wondering if some of you could give me some advice on it, and how its drops, nets, clears, smashes are.

    thnxs !!
     
  18. franxon

    franxon Regular Member

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2005
    Messages:
    182
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Singapore
    Lin Dan is a singles player, Fu is a doubles player. the speed/power of their smashes are not comparable.

    and buddy, you didn't really follow my logic.

    my logic doesn't suggest that Ti-10 is the hardest smashing racquet, since it is the choice of the hardest smasher. in fact there's no such thing like the hardest smashing racquet in the world. and my logic does not even suggest that Fu Hai Feng smashes the hardest with Ti-10. you must have misread/misunderstood me.

    no one knows if Fu smashes harder with another racquet. for example maybe AT700 gives Fu better smashing power but poorer control or something, so Fu doesn't choose it. or maybe he simply doesn't like the painting on AT700 or any weird reason. you never know.

    so the fact that he doesn't choose AT700 doesn't tell you anything, except that he is happier with Ti-10 than with AT700 for the time being. it doesn't tell you Fu does not smash as hard with an AT700 as he does with a Ti-10. this is simple logic.

    what we know is that he chooses Ti-10. this does tell us something. so buddy, my real logic here is:

    a. his choice is definitely not purely based on the racquet's smashing performance in his hand. badminton is not all about smashing. so please never assume Fu Hai Feng or any other pros will choose the best smashing racquets for them, or assume their choice of racquet is their choice of racquet for smash (it is possible, but it is not for certain), and say this is my logic.

    b. as a power smasher, his choice is definitely partially based on the racquet's smashing performance in his hand. so, this is for certain, that Fu is happy with Ti-10's smashing performance in his hand. therefore, we can safely say Ti-10 is not a racquet that can not perform smashing well.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    reviews from you and I are simply not as helpful/reliable as a pro's choice of racket when choosing a racket. in fact, many of us in the forum are not good enough to review racquets, sorry for the offending. but we do so anyway, because it is a forum and we are here to speak.

    if you read carefully, good reviews from cooler, ants & co. are actually saying the same/similiar thing pros' choices of racquet say.
     
  19. DinkAlot

    DinkAlot dcbadminton
    Brand Representative

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2005
    Messages:
    12,457
    Likes Received:
    68
    Occupation:
    www.dcbadminton.net
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    I should have said sponsored to use Yonex rackets.
     
  20. DinkAlot

    DinkAlot dcbadminton
    Brand Representative

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2005
    Messages:
    12,457
    Likes Received:
    68
    Occupation:
    www.dcbadminton.net
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    Agree and disagree. General reviews are not optimum but neither are the pros. The majority do not play anywhere near the pro level. Like you said, the pros are given certain options and they choose.

    I've talked to some pros and when you ask them about their racket of choice, they are very vague. They mostly say something like "this racket feels good to me" or "this is the racket I prefer". You have to really pry to get some very specific information and even then they will tell you the most important thing is not the racket but your technique, shot selection and footwork. Of course if they are sponsored by a certain company, they tell you to try the rackets with that company and see what you like best.
     

Share This Page