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Avoiding crossed strings outside frame

Discussion in 'Badminton Stringing Techniques & Tools' started by DuckFeet, Apr 28, 2014.

  1. DuckFeet

    DuckFeet Regular Member

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    http://badmintonforlifetime.blogspot.co.uk/2014/04/badminton-stringing.html?m=1

    I thought crossed string was just bad for aesthetics, there is a functional reason to avoid it too?

    I do try, but it seems unavoidable sometimes. Last racquet I deliberately sent the string under other strings in the outside as I find Mark's tip of always going under the first main very useful. It makes the grommet easier to thread from above. Any tips please? Next one I will try sending them all over/same side as it came out the grommet. Or can you tell from looking and each one is different? I don't use a string mover but I can see how that could help influence how the strings cross in the grommet.
     
  2. mvdzwaan

    mvdzwaan Regular Member

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    I agree, sometimes it's unavoidable, but I do always check to see if passing an outer string under or above is working best. At the bottom (T-Side) I have most control in the end result (except sometimes the place where 3 strings are running in parallel with yonex 4 knot).When putting the mains on and the last grommet (10), I have to pass the string from 9->12, best results are when I go above on the side where I start the cross, and under on the other side. At the top of the racket with separate cross/main grommets I always look at the string-preferred way to go into the next grommet and use this to determine above/under. As for functional reasons.... I have never had any complaints if it was unavoidable. I've also seen some stringings from reputable stringers with single crossed strings.Last racket I bought (VT70) had the string in it from the factory and there it seems almost like they were crossing it deliberately, as some strings crossed 2 times on the outside (like a twisted pair). It seem to me the only real functional problem with crossed on the outside is the string can not move freely any more, and thus the settling of the string after stringing could be an issue. Of course, the settling is only really necessary when you're not stringing consistently ;)
     
    #2 mvdzwaan, Apr 28, 2014
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2014
  3. Mark A

    Mark A Regular Member

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    I avoid it because the two strings will eat into each other if they cross over - like "notching", only worse.
     
  4. DuckFeet

    DuckFeet Regular Member

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    Yeah but how? ;)
     
  5. emjay

    emjay Regular Member

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    I can usually avoid it when there's just 2 strings but when you have three parallel to eachother it's down to luck! I've never crossed over 2 strings like in that link though, that's pretty bad!
     
  6. kwun

    kwun Administrator

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    i want to see an example in which:

    - there is evidence that there is rubbing, ie. any kinda of indentation in the string from crossing-over.
    - if there is rubbing, that it actually affect anything in terms of playability or durability

    fact is that i don't think any of the above is true. the two strings are crossing at such a narrow angle, the rubbing (if any) is insignificant compared to say, mains string against cross string. (and we don't worry at all about the 450+ main/cross crossovers, why should we worry about a handful of crossovers outside the frame?)

    it is great for stringers to make sure that their stringjob looks as pretty as possible, but to claim that preventing crossover is worth anything but prettiness, you guys will have to convince me first.
     
  7. emjay

    emjay Regular Member

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    I'm getting better at this, haven't had one in the last few that I've strung. For me it's aesthetic only, I've never noticed any wear when I have had a crossed string.
     
  8. DarthHowie

    DarthHowie Regular Member

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    I agree with you and Kwun. The only time i ever notice wear in the corners are from individuals that have their racket scrape against the floor (not from picking up birds) when they try to stop or change directions (going forwards to backwards). You can tell by seeing that the paint on the corners of the frame being worn out in a uniform fashion.
     
  9. Mark A

    Mark A Regular Member

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    If there is even the slightest non-aesthetic benefit to avoiding the crossover, I'll do it. It's mainly to quell my own OCD, if I'm honest:).
     
  10. blableblibloblu

    blableblibloblu Regular Member

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    ^So if there's a benefit to having crossovers you're doomed :p
     
  11. silentheart

    silentheart Regular Member

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    Cross on top of frame is easy to avoid. So don't cross on the top because it expose the top string and possible damage while picking up shuttles. The bottom part is harder to avoid. In theory, it will not hurt the frame or grommet. But stacking on the grommet is a no-no. That is the one with the string on top of the other string coming out or going into shared grommet. That will put extra pressure on the grommet and damage the grommet. Also, possible cut into the frame.
     
  12. emjay

    emjay Regular Member

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    How not to do it...

    20141118_121002.jpg

    20141118_121011.jpg
     
  13. Mark A

    Mark A Regular Member

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  14. emjay

    emjay Regular Member

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    I know, that's the worst I've ever seen! Not my work I'm happy to say.

    Here's mine, I'm getting better these days:

    20141211_113113.jpg

    20141211_113131.jpg
     
    #14 emjay, Dec 11, 2014
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2014

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