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Backhand low serve - where to aim?

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by allyjack110, Jul 22, 2011.

  1. allyjack110

    allyjack110 Regular Member

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    2007514133839835.jpg


    ADVANCED DOUBLES

    I predominately play a lot of Men’s Doubles and at an increasingly competitive level against some really good players. In light of this I want to make my low backhand serve as effective and as accurate as possible. Obviously I want get the shuttle as close as possible to my opponent’s service line, but am unsure exactly which 'points' I should be aiming for – spots 1, 2 or 3? Personally, I would refrain from serving out wide to ‘Point 1’ as I don’t want to open up the angles. This leaves both Points 2 and 3. Bear in mind Point 2 – centre position – is where my opponents would typically position themselves as the receiver. I predominately try and aim for Point 3. However, what is the correct ‘textbook’ method used by professionals and advanced players alike? I would appreciate your comments and suggestions. My apologies for the crudeness of the illustration.

    A
     
    #1 allyjack110, Jul 22, 2011
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2011
  2. kwun

    kwun Administrator

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    pros aim for point 3 most of the time.

    but there is no reason why you shouldn't mix it up a little occasionally. if you always aim for point 3, then your opponent will have an advantage in receiving your service.
     
  3. Avenger

    Avenger Regular Member

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    I would also say 3 is the most common one (but sometimes I also use 1 or wider)
     
  4. visor

    visor Regular Member

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    I used to vary it, but recently have been having much success with aiming right at them, especially ... at their eyes.... This is very effective in causing confusion for the receiver as to whether to hit it with forehand or backhand. But especially, it also makes it difficult for them to judge the timing and speed of the serve as they will lose track of the bird for a split second when the bird flies towards their eyes. .... Try that next time and you'll see what I mean. :)
     
  5. thejym

    thejym Regular Member

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    I don't think there is a "textbook" method. Since badminton is a game with so many changing variables, it makes sense that there isn't a formula to guarantee success.

    I think it is important to highlight the pros and cons of each serve, but which one you do at any given moment in the game is entirely up to you. It's always best to be well practiced with serving to those three points so that your consistency no longer becomes a deciding variable. Then your choice will depend on your opponent's strengths/weaknesses, your tactics, and overall strategy.

    Serving to point 3:
    Pros:
    -Shortest distance, meaning your opponent will not be able to reach the shuttle as close to the net
    -Forces your opponent to generate all the angles
    -Can cause uncertainty about whether it is in or out of court

    Cons:
    -Because it is the most common serve, receivers tend to be well practiced in returning it. They will typically stand a little closer to the center line in anticipation that the straight serve will travel the shortest distance.

    At the advanced and professional level, you will see this serve the most because the receivers are so fast that serving wide will allow them to take the shot very close to the net and gives them much more threatening angles of attack.

    Serving to point 2:
    Pros:
    -You don't have to worry about serving it out -- only that it goes past the line
    -Receiver might have trouble choosing to go backhand or forehand

    Cons:
    -Travels a farther distance than serving to point 3
    -Opponent only needs to reach forward
    -Gives the opponent the ability to hit left or right with either backhand or forehand (if sufficiently skilled), which can be hard to read

    Serving to point 1:
    Pros:
    -Can catch your opponent off guard since so many players set up for the straight serve

    Cons:
    -Gives your opponent the angle to make very threatening shots
    -Shuttle travels the longest distance (and therefore spends the most time in the air), which gives your opponent more time to move

    What's interesting is that because straight serves are done so often at the professional level, you will see the receivers standing closer to the center line in order to attack the shuttle faster. If the server serves wide, the receiver may not necessarily intercept it any closer to the net, but the angles still remain open for attack. Should you choose to serve wide against advanced players, your best hope is that your opponent shifts their weight forward in anticipation of the straight serve and therefore is less susceptible to moving sideways.
     
  6. LD rules!

    LD rules! Regular Member

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    mixing it up, is probably the most effective way.:) serving to a particular point all the time gets predictable and the longer the match goes on, the more the opponent will exploit you not mixing up your serve.:)
     
  7. gingerphil79

    gingerphil79 Regular Member

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    Visor and thejym are correct. Generally play to the point 3 but mix it up. look for weaknesses off the bat. We practice serve and forget that this is more than jus a shot to start the rally. It can be used to gain advantage. We so often get serves to the centre that sometimes aiming for their racket foot can put them off.

    Watch the grip they adopt. If they have a neutral grip, serve at their racket. If they have a forehand grip, serve to their backhand side and if they have a backhand grip, serve to their forehand side.

    As always the important thing is keeping it tight to the tape and being ready after for al the possible replys. Its amazing the amount of 1s who hit it and stand their as if they are waiting in a queue!! Get into a low stance ready position slightly to the side where you have served
     
  8. extremenanopowe

    extremenanopowe Regular Member

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    if you are confident in your serve, mix it. else stick to 3. ;)
     
  9. visor

    visor Regular Member

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    ginger, extreme: Not only aim at the receiver, but try specifically at his eyes when the bird goes over the tape. I find that this will cause the receiver to lose track of the bird momentarily and slow dson their reaction.
     
  10. nprince

    nprince Regular Member

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    I would like to aim at "3" again and again. I agree with Thejym's analysis. To add to that, I find another advantage.

    When server manages to make a succesful low serve aimed at 3, opponents are under pressure to make an effective reply. Server is already near the net with with his racket up ready to intercept anything remotely loose. That will force the opponent to lift where the servers partner gains attack.

    Aiming at "2"(towards eyes) works with intermediate-but against better players, that can work againstthe server. Anything remotely loose will be punished. And aiming at "1" only under two cicumstances. one: If the opponent anticipates your serve and stnd too close to the "T" two: As a surprise variation

    nprince
     
  11. nprince

    nprince Regular Member

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    To add to my earlier post. Another problem with aiming wide is that it does not put the receiver under any movement pressure-see where the serve to position 1 crosses the net in diagram. That is where a goo receiver will attempt to meet the bird. At the same time, receiver will get more options to play away from the server (Better angles to work)
     
  12. sean888

    sean888 New Member

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    A few thing s I like to add that in doubles serving

    1) Stand as close to the net legally as possible. Tilt your body slightly forward and extend your racket face as far out as you can - legally of course. This reduces the distance the bird has to travel to the receiver and is to your advantage that the receiver has less time. Just ganing a few inches makes a big difference.

    2) When you hit to say #3, bring your racket up, move forward and and intercept the possible angles. The receiver's racket face, angle of swing and habits gives you hints. If you are able to stop his/her pushes by intercepting, you are immediately ganing the advantage. Even if you are able to get a few intermittently that way, you are causing the receiver to hesitate and lift the shuutle to the back, which then allows your partner to initiate the attack.

    3) After service, keep your racket up, stay low and racket head slightly behind your head. This allows more time for you to react to the bird coming back at high speed.
     
  13. extremenanopowe

    extremenanopowe Regular Member

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    Good one. So, everyone must study 'physics' better to become a better badminton player. So who fluncked? You better quit badminton. lol. ;)
     
  14. Sevex

    Sevex Regular Member

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    Personally I'd serve in the area which helps to set up the attack for you. Presumably you will have a region on the court where you tend to have the most success placing your serve well and then winning a point, so start off serving there. If the opposing player can't do much then fine, keep serving there. If on the other hand the opponent keeps gaining the upper hand then serve somewhere else until you find a weakness. At a high level you will have to adjust where you put the serve as your opponent begins predicting it and gaining the attack.

    So to conclude, there isn't one "right" place to serve during an entire match or against every player. Although if your serve is tight to the tape and lands close to the front line it will help a lot more than where you aim the serve (imo).
     
  15. Mark A

    Mark A Regular Member

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    While I see no reason to aim at 2, aiming at 1 is a legitmate "once in a while" tactic precisely because the straight shot is the most common reply. I find it easier to serve wide when I'm in the right-hand court (I'm a righty) so this would put me on the backhand side, which isn't ideal, so I always use the wide serve from the left court when I do use it.
     
  16. a|extan

    a|extan Regular Member

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    everytime i aim at different spots just hope to confuse the opponents.
     

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