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Badminton Central Guide to choosing Badminton Equipment

Discussion in 'Racket Recommendation / Comparison' started by kwun, Feb 28, 2005.

  1. chris-ccc

    chris-ccc Regular Member

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    .
    I like what kwun has posted in this thread (in the opening post- Post #1).

    As one of BC's professional coach, I would like to comment on the string tension (as kwun has informed us).

    IMHO, most of our BCers have often over-rated our skill-levels; And therefore, choosing higher tensions for our strings.

    I would suggest that BCers to try the medium string tension first (which is ranging from 21 to 24 lbs). Only when we can hit consistently from our strings' sweet-spot (centre of the string-bed), then we can move up to higher string tensions.

    If we are consistently hitting missing the sweet-spot, then it's best to move down to the lower string tensions (ranging from 18 to 20 lbs).
    .
     
    #41 chris-ccc, Jul 16, 2013
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2013
  2. FeatherBlaster

    FeatherBlaster Regular Member

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    I second that Chris!!

    After taking 15 years off badminton, I've started to play again this season. I was surprised how much tensions had increased while I was away. Both for top players and club-level players.

    I understand that the rackets can take much more punishment now than 15-20 years ago, where everything above 10kg would put the racket at risk (of course depending on the racket quality and state). But I also see a tendency among non-top-level players that higher tensions is the way to go.

    It's more or less the same that was going on with golf shafts 10-15 years ago. People opted for too stiff shafts because that was what all the pros were using. (I used to be an assistent golf pro).

    Now, when I rebooted my badminton life, I went and bought a VT70 racket (from a shop in Denmark that caters for a very high percentage of the top players in Copenhagen), and the stringer was surprised that I asked for no more than 11,5 kg. (I initially asked for 10,5 which was my old tension, but he suggested that most VT70 users was going for 12 kg, and that he himself played at 13 kg.). We settled at 11,5 kg. for me to test (he actually borrowed me a LiNing N90 strung at 13 kg. to try out, before deciding - I found it too hard, due to having more mishits than I used to, after 15 years off.

    Now, I see lower level club players at my club, and juniors as well, going for tensions above 10kg, and I really cannot see how on earth that would help them at all. They'll just get worse off in a lot of situations, and in very few situations they will benefit, but due to their level these benefits are not that big (added control on some shots is not worth too much, if you don't hit the shuttle very consistently to begin with).

    I think this is due to two things:
    One is hype. Hard is better. All good players go for hard tensions, if you yield a racket with a hard tension, you send the message "I'm good".
    The other reason is self-deception. Coming mostly from the sounds of the strings/racket, when hitting it dead center. We know that a hard strung racket sounds better when hit with a crisp shot. And that will trick people into feeling that the shot is harder and/or more precise. By generating the same sound as the pro's (or something more close to it anyway), you think you're hitting the shuttle better. Even though you don't get more speed! Then if you hit 40% of your shots bang on with a hard tensioned racket, you remember those hits, instead of maybe getting 60% good shots from a lesser tensioned string, that doesn't ring a bell or sound like thunder when you hit it. People would often opt for the few good shots, rather than the more consistent but less convincing sounding shots, telling themselves that they "can manage" this tension.

    It's their problem really. I'll just have an easier time beating them. But I don't understand why it has come to this for so many players. In badminton people don't seek advice from a coach or pro on equipment as they do in golf. Maybe that's the reason.

    PS: I used to play at a high level, and I was also a paid coach myself 20 years ago. So I can still move the shuttle decent around the court. I play only feathers, and my comments are only aimed at feather players (I think for plastic you should go even less tension). I'm currently playing bg-80 string, so that's my reference.
     
  3. FeatherBlaster

    FeatherBlaster Regular Member

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    Sorry for replying to such an old post, I didn't notice the thread was inactive... :)
     
  4. visor

    visor Regular Member

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    A good resurrection though. :)

    Like you, I too love to play against players who play with tensions higher than they can handle. Makes my life so much easier. :D
     
  5. kwun

    kwun Administrator

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    late is not a problem. i enjoyed reading your post and your viewpoint and experience. which i totally agree.
     
  6. Cycril

    Cycril Regular Member

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    Well said. Big thumbs up from me. Salute! That should sums up why people keep asking me : your shots sounds dull, but why you can still make a nice clear out of it? 23 x 25lbs with durakill 66.
     
  7. visor

    visor Regular Member

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    Whoa... Excellent post! [MENTION=19360]crawshaws[/MENTION]
     
  8. chris-ccc

    chris-ccc Regular Member

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    One of the best informative posts ever made at BadmintonCentral

    .
    Yes indeed; It is one of the best informative posts ever made at BadmintonCentral.

    Hope that more BCers could get the opportunity to read it.
    .
     
  9. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    In another thread, one poster said 24lbs was a low tension! When I pointed out 24lbs is not low, I think there was some disbelief.

    24lbs would have been regarded as high tension back in the 90's. It was Park Joo Bong who requested racquets at 30lbs tension in those days - blame him! (got this story from the stringing team that did his racquets in HK)
     
  10. pcll99

    pcll99 Regular Member

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    should be sticky!!!
     
  11. Gary Lim

    Gary Lim Regular Member

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    Not going to quote crawshaw's post but I agree that it's awesome!

    Non-judgmental and doesn't shout down at beginners wanting answers to basic questions.

    Definitely should sticky this!
     
  12. chris-ccc

    chris-ccc Regular Member

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    That's because Park Joo Bong was an excellent player

    .
    That's because Park Joo Bong was able to hit the shuttlecock consistently right from the middle of the sweet-spot of the string-bed. When this happens, it can be really nice to have strings strung at 30lbs (or higher).

    IMHO, 99.99% of players are not able to hit as accurately as Park Joo Bong could. When we aren't able to hit from the middle of the sweet-spot; we would expect Park Joo Bong to say:- "You've done a 'mis-hit' again? Not good, not good. Train harder".

    The 'negative side' of the story is:- Many players will start to think that badminton is such a difficult sport to play.

    The 'funny side' of the story is:- We find some players saying "I'm a good player. I can play with higher string tension".

    :):):)
    .
     
    #52 chris-ccc, Sep 11, 2014
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2014
  13. mhamza

    mhamza New Member

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    Guys i m an offensive player love smashes and also perform spins which yonex racket do u suggest i am currently using three rackets <1> muscle power 100 <2>carbonex 21 with isometric head (model:2013) and <3> voltric 70 which of these is good for me also which new 1 should i buy
     
  14. Vic Arora

    Vic Arora Regular Member

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    Anyone playing with a pro Kennex kinetic speed. Need a review
     
  15. Shinichi

    Shinichi Regular Member

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    head heavy seem perfect for you. Go with VT70.
     
  16. Hyper recover

    Hyper recover New Member

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    What to choose

    How does victor vs 850 nanotec string on a Senston N80 Graphite sound for a 11 year old boy going on 12 sound :confused:

    P.S. It's my first time at badminton central
     
  17. Hyper recover

    Hyper recover New Member

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    Is the Senston N80 Graphite Racquet okay? I've heard good reviews on it but after reading this article, I'm having doubts on it. Can someone do a review on this, thanks.
     
  18. R@hul

    R@hul Regular Member

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    voltric 70 will be the best... gud luck
     
  19. Kris M

    Kris M New Member

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    hi all.
    i'm new to this forum. i'm a local club level player with intermediate level of playing. i'm 5ft 6" and with avg body size. i'm presently using a li-ning SS 68 which seems to be a bit head heavy racket and I'm fine with it. I like to play attacking game. I'm trying to get a new racket within my limited budget which would allow me to hit a bit of powerful smashes.. maybe more than what I presently achieve using SS 68. I've zeroed in on li-ning Gforce 2200i or li-ning UC 3000. Can somebody suggest, which one would be better as I like li-ning rackets due to its grip size which is comfortable for me compared to yonex.
     
  20. Wiidiculous

    Wiidiculous New Member

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