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Badminton Central Guide to Stringing Tools

Discussion in 'Badminton Stringing Techniques & Tools' started by kwun, Apr 10, 2012.

  1. yan.v

    yan.v Regular Member

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    The Victor cutters I received with my machine are pretty good too. I could pretty much cut a string in half in the direction of the string!
     
  2. Exert

    Exert Regular Member

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    Still using pros pro cutters LOL not the best but still does the job...
     
  3. kwun

    kwun Administrator

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    you guys really need to give the Tamiya side cutter a try. i have tried a couple of Xurons and they don't even come close.

    I am not sure who the OEM is but it is very similar to the Yonex side cutter but much "cheaper".

    you can find them in ebay or plastic modeling stores. should be around $20-25 each. worth every penny.

    this one:

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/74001-Tamiy...121593570?pt=Model_Kit_US&hash=item58bc9e00e2

    don't get the cheaper one.
     
  4. yan.v

    yan.v Regular Member

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  5. kwun

    kwun Administrator

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    They look good. I will not be surprised if they are made by the same OEM. and if so they are a better deal than the tamiya ones.
     
  6. jsunsun

    jsunsun Regular Member

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    Thought I'd share my idea of an economical version of a good cutter. I do have a oem yonex cutter. It wasn't perfect such that it only makes clean cuts on the tip 1/3 of the blade. I'm not the original owner of this cutter, so not sure if it was due to over-usage or it was never perfect. I have cutters that look like the cheaper smaller Xuron cutters, that also initially cut very nicely, but over time developed some play side to side such that the pair of blades no longer meet up perfectly.

    Looking at the Yonex design, it essentially looks like a light duty diagonal wire cutter/nipper you can buy at the hardware store. I believe the major difference between a 30-40$ yonex or tamiya cutter and the eg 5$ ones from a hardware store is the quality control. The ones from the hardware doesn't need to be precise since they are made to cutter tough metal wires. Since the key factor is quality control, I took a piece of string and brought it to the hardware store. I literally tested all the smaller diagonal cutters they carried by making test cuts on my sample string and picked the best one. I tested about 20 cutters, and only found 2 that are good. I defined good as ones that cuts cleanly on the entire length of the blade. I'm not sure how durable these cutters will be, but since the design essentially look the same at the Yonex ones, I'm guessing they will stand the test of time. So if quality control is the main difference between an expensive cutter versus a cheap hardware store version, I essentially found a high quality cutter by sorting through a bunch of cheap cutters at the hardware store. Of course this will only work if the store packaging doesn't hinder you from making actual test cuts.
     
  7. yan.v

    yan.v Regular Member

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    I've done that before, there wasnt a single cutter worth buying! You're lucky your store had some!
     
  8. Nicholas Tam

    Nicholas Tam Regular Member

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    So I recently got an AEF stringing machine and threw out the rubbish bundled cutters and got a pair of Tamiya 74123 from a hobby shop. On another day I was down at the local hardware street and saw a relatively cheap pair of King branded cutters for more or less the same price as similar Chinese branded ones so I bought a pair for lols just to see how much of a difference a cheap cutter would make.

    What happened afterwards compelled me to write a mini-review of... side cutters in BC.

    [​IMG]

    I swear I'm not biased but I own some King branded tools which are of very good quality, expected of a Japanese brand. What I wasn't expecting, was that it cut better than the Tamiya. I didn't notice this when cutting thicker synthetic strings like the BG65 but it was quite evident when I was cutting through the Vectran of BG80.

    Take note that both of these came packaged, stapled and sealed so there's no trial and error and I did not pick a specific cutter. This mini review is based on the out-of-box performance when I was doing some stringing.

    King FC-120 (HKD30/USD3.8)
    Picked this up from the hardware store as it was pretty cheap, and more or less the same price as the Chinese branded ones. Make no mistake, this is a legitimately cheap pair of plastic nippers from King and the price tag is still intact as you could see in the photo. It looks similar to Xuron's design but it's Japanese, so expected it to be more durable in the joint. Although not visible, this cutter is spring loaded. This cutter is lightweight and cuts so well I'm baffled why people aren't buying more of this.

    EDIT: I just looked up King's parent company, Tsunoda's website and found out that this is a new product in May 2016. No wonder I never came across these before.

    Tamiya 74123 (HKD198/USD25)
    This was at the same price as the older 74035 from a model shop so I thought I may as well grab the newer model. Mechanically, this cutter is smoother and feels more robust than the King and is a joy to use as the heft is just right. Don't get me wrong, this cutter cuts very well but for some reason it just refuses to make a clean cut on vectran strings unless I'm using the mid to inner part of the jaws whereas the King managed a clean cut from the tip.

    Conclusion: Tamiya's are overrated with jacked up prices; I'm not sure how I did not realize this before but King does OEM tools and I reckon are Yonex and Tamiya's OEM. If you could get a King branded tool over its rebrands, you'll save yourself quite abit of money.
     
    #48 Nicholas Tam, Nov 28, 2016
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2016
    kwun likes this.

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