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Badminton racket modification

Discussion in 'Badminton Rackets / Equipment' started by e3_silversurfer, Jan 16, 2009.

  1. e3_silversurfer

    e3_silversurfer New Member

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    Just contributing a little of my exprience with regards to badminton equipment especially rackets :)

    As I have been living in the UK and basically badminton rackets come in G3 sizes (which is not very suitable for me as I am asian and have got smaller and thinner hands :p) I am faced with 2 options;

    1) Order from asia or

    2) modify the racket

    I chosen the 2nd route. So, basically G3's handle is about 2mm to 3mm thicker than G5 and this can be felt if you put a grip onto it (as I play mostly with my backhand rather than forehand, I find that G5 is the most comfortable and fastest to maneuvour especially in tight situations)

    Well I bought sandpaper and used a pair of venier calipers. after measuring a sample G5 racket (from a Nanospeed 6000 which I have broken while playing :( ) I stripped off the factory fitted grip and dug out the "staples" holding the grip's bevel onto the wooden handle.

    Anyway I sanded down the wooden handle and after wrapping a grip on it, it was PERFECT :)

    I have done the same to a further 4 rackets of mine.

    Just thought of sharing with you guys :)
     
  2. cards_pro

    cards_pro Regular Member

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    Good for you. I was thinking to do that on one of my racquet. I have a few questions if you don't mind.
    1) How long did you take to sand it down to G5?
    2) What did you do to the cone? ( I mean the handle that close to the cone)

    If possible, could you post some pictures? :D
     
  3. e3_silversurfer

    e3_silversurfer New Member

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    depending on the grade of the sandpaper, I used medium in this case and it took me about 30mins to 45 mins to complete the modification. I advise having the sand paper held with a block of wood so that it is more linear (if you know what i mean)

    nothing needs to be done to the cone at all as the only area you will be sanding down is the handle area. the slope from the Hexagon grip area to the cone area is not affected. you can leav it as it is.

    Pictures.... hmmmm i dont have any pictres at the monet but I have another 2 rackets that I am thinking off doing. I might take detailed pictures then and post them up here.

    I have got another few mods and theories I might post up here as well.
     
  4. silentheart

    silentheart Regular Member

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    do another search on sand paper. there is another post with pictures.
     
  5. taneepak

    taneepak Regular Member

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    Occupation:
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    Sanding down a wooden handle needs some care. The reason is that larger wooden handles have longer and/or larger internal tunnels, necessary to balance out and to take away the extra weight of larger handles, so that different sizes of wooden handles of a particular model of racquet will actually weigh the same.
    One end of the handle at the shaft end is drilled to accept the shaft and at the other end a tunnel is drilled to balance the weight of different size handles, so that a g5 handle will weigh exactly as a g3 handle. A g3 handle will have more weight (wood) taken off the tunnel, either by making the diameter of the tunnel bigger or its length longer, or both, so that the extra wood taken off is roughly equal to the extra weight from the increased size of the handle.
    Sanding down will weaken the handle. Wooden handles of badminton racquets all have two tunnels, one at the shaft end which is sealed and closed with the shaft using glue, and the other at the opposite end has a larger and longer empty tunnel, plugged at the butt end with a plastic cap. Depending on the weights to be taken off from the butt end side of the tunnel, the 2 tunnels can sometimes almost meet, separated by a mere 10mm of solid wood. A smaller handle will have a shorter rear end tunnel which is further away from the front end shaft end.
     

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