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best strategy(ies) to win a singles game

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by cchyboy, Feb 10, 2005.

  1. cchyboy

    cchyboy Regular Member

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    what do you guys think?what kind of strategy would be the best to win a singles game,taking that both opponent has the same stamina and skill.
    would tiring the opponent work?or is it deceptive shots that would work?or is it a combination of different playing styles.
    Experts,come and voice out your opinions.
     
  2. Mag

    Mag Moderator

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    Take your time to analyze your opponent

    There is, as I think you suspected, no simple answer to your question. No "secret recipe" tactic for winning exists.

    A good tactic is always a result of how the opponent plays. Often the key to winning is to exploit the weaknesses of the opponent. In order to do so you must discover those weaknesses.

    When I play an opponent that I know nothing about, I usually start out pretty "transparent" and defensively, with basic shots, long serves, deep high clears, straight drops etc. This is not the time to play trick shots. I play to all four corners, or perhaps concentrate on one corner or side at a time, to try to find out if the opponent has a "weak side" and a "strong side". In general, most players are slightly weaker in the rear backhand corner and the front forehand corner. I usually "test" those first. Then I try a few short serves, to see how the opponent handles them. If the opponent returns with a good, flat drive to a rear corner, or a good short net reply, I usually return to long serves. But if my short serves are resulting in lifts or poor net returns, I stick with the low serves.

    It's usually a good idea to try to keep the shuttle going in the beginning. Partly in order to give you opportunity to observe the opponent, but also because it's good to get a few proper rallies to get into the game. Thus, don't try to finish the rallies too early, save the flat-out attacks for later if (or when) you need them...

    So once again, it's all about analyzing the opponent and playing accordingly. If the opponent has a weak defense, you should do everything to provoke poor lifts. If the opponent has a weak backhand, play to the backhand. Hit to where it hurts most. ;)

    It's also important to realize that only very rarely can you use the same tactics throughout a game. Your opponent is observing you, just like you are observing him...

    This subject is endless, and I am sure that other in this forum have more and better advice, but the above are at least a few rules of thumb that I use (or try to use).

    Good luck with your playing, and remember that sometimes the opponent is just better (or smarter) than you!
    :D
     
    #2 Mag, Feb 10, 2005
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2005
  3. WEBWHISKY

    WEBWHISKY Regular Member

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    Very good advice, Mag.

    I often try to start the game quickly and agressively -with hard smashes or cross court net shots, just to put pressure on my opponent and take advantage at scoring. But I realize now that if I fail in doing that in the first rallies of the game (i.e I lose those rallies), I put pressure on myself ! :eek: :crying: :D

    I will try to be more "passive" (less agressive), observing my opponent,as you say it. :D

    What are "flat-out attacks" ? (excuse my english!)
     
  4. Mag

    Mag Moderator

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    Sorry, I meant "full-out" as in 100% aggression... :)
    (Something that seldom pays off in singles anyway!)
     
  5. tinkerbella122

    tinkerbella122 Regular Member

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    So true ~! Every shot you make depends on the opponent . Because since you don't know what shots they are going to hit , you can't really plan ahead . But one strategy that I recommend is if your opponents hits a cross court net shot , then you hit a cross court net shot back . It works pretty well , but it all depnds on the shot your opponent makes ...
     
  6. Big Slick

    Big Slick Regular Member

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    I would say that a simple strategy is to work out what type of game your opponent likes to play and try make them play a different game, i.e. if they play a flat and fast game then play high clears and lifts and try and change the game to a speed that suits you better.

    I have to agree with what Mag said, try a bit of everything at the start to see if you can get a feel for your opponent. The key thing is that you have to be able to adapt quickly during the game to what happens. Any player worth his salt will change his game if you catch him out a couple times with a particular strategy.

    Of course there is no simple answer, but I would say that the most important thing is that you have to put your opponent under pressure, whatever way you do it. Even the best players make mistakes under pressure, it's just a question of how much pressure. You can't sit back and wait for your opponent to take control, you gotta try boss people around on court...
     
  7. Joseph

    Joseph Regular Member

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    This may sound a bit strange, but this is what a friend told me. It's a variation of what my friend told me actually. :p

    Every person has a certain pattern to how they play. Whoever figures out their opponent's pattern first will win. So just figure out what his pattern his and exploit it. He'll probably try and change it but when it all comes down to it, there's a pattern.
     
  8. checkthemc

    checkthemc Regular Member

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    hmm

    These are pretty good things, but I would like to know if anyone knows and combinations. One "trick" my coach taught me was to hit a drop to their forhand corner and then use an attacking clear to their backhand. IT seems pretty effective.
     

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