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Checklist or Formula for Analyzing Opponents Weakness in Doubles

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by Birdy, Feb 9, 2014.

  1. Birdy

    Birdy Regular Member

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    I was just thinking a lot about the importance of game observation and picking on weaknesses or strengths that can be exploited particularly for Doubles.

    So I did a search and found this thread: http://www.badmintoncentral.com/forums/archive/index.php/t-106163.html?

    @shooting stroke says that the ability to observe game is a skill and requires a the analyzer to possess a lot of game knowledge. This I agree with. Without understanding the game and game strategies, how can one expect to pick up things that go on during a game?

    So this begs the question, what are some things that amateurs like myself can start doing to build up this game obversation skill?

    So far, I've been coming to this forum to ask questions which I have found extremely helpful in developing game insights?

    Can you guys share your experiences or game encounters where you pick up on your opponents weaknesses and exploited it?


     
  2. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    a) play more
    b) talk to people who watch you more (not on a forum)
    c) show us your match on youtube
    d) make sure, technically, you are competent
    e) have a coach
    f) watch other youtube videos of matches and the commentary.
     
  3. Mr.H.

    Mr.H. Regular Member

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    It begins with playing. A lot of playing. Maybe even 'competetive' games where there is more at stake compared to a recreational game. Combine that with talking to (experienced) players and coaches about game strategies/game plans and ask them to evaluate your matches. Also coaching other players, maybe more beginner-level players, it depends on your own level of skill, helps giving you more insight in game dynamics and strategies.
    What also helped me a lot in 'in-game' situations was staying calmer and not letting my emotions affect me so much. Don't know how old you are but in my case it came with getting a bit older, I used to be a lot more emotional on court when I was in my teens.
     
    #3 Mr.H., Feb 21, 2014
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2014
  4. catman

    catman Regular Member

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    I learned a lot about Tennis by watching TV coverage and listening to the commentators. In Badminton - I started watching on youtube - but haven't found indepth commentary most of the time the British lady doesn't say too much.
    I was thinking maybe English commentary from another source might offer more insight.
     
  5. exalted

    exalted Regular Member

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    Anything commentated by Morten Frost is great. As a previous great of the game, his commentary is always very high level and he isn't afraid to call out weaknesses in some of the world's best. It's always an added pleasure watching a high level match with his commentating.
     
  6. raymond

    raymond Regular Member

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    The English lady Gill herself is a retired professional. A lot of time she's accompanied by another prof (or ex-prof). I've yet to run into any video commentated by Morten Frost. Any sample?
     
  7. teoky

    teoky Regular Member

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    If you understand Mandarin, listen to the commentaries by the Chinese commentator. It is very good and a lot of times, they give some history and info which you don't get else where.

    For example, in the recent exhibition match between LD/LCW vs FHF/CY, Bao Chunlai was the guest commentator and he shared info on LD.
     
  8. catman

    catman Regular Member

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    Sadly, don't understand Manadrin - but I've heard chinese commentary is very good, especially with technical details. I play Table Tennis, it's the same thing with Table Tennis commentary - Chinese are excellent - very difficult to find good English. Recently, I've had success talking the American commentators to start talking advanced techniques on their live stream broadcasts. Previously, they were talking to US beginners - we were able to convince them only TT players will watch a websteam - we don't want to know how scores are counted - they've started discussing higher level strategy - hopefully we can get the same with Gill (But British tend to quite reserved with commentary). I think in her case she's maybe thinking viewers are quite knowledgeable and not wanting to say too much. Not too sure.
    Unable to find any Morten Frost commentary - links would be helpful.
     
  9. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    I think Morten frost commented on the recent Superseries finals?

    Also quite possibly the 2002 Thomas Cup (iirc).
     
  10. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    Going back to the original question, it can be very difficult to pick up on weaknesses. I was at a team match and my team mate was playing singles. It was a high quality, intense match. I asked another team mate to give advice in the break as I wasn't able to pick up weaknesses of the opponent.

    My team mate had been a former international junior player. Her advice to our player was there was an area of weakness on the deep forehand rear court. The opponent would never jump to meet the shuttle there but would plant his foot and play the shot. So, the opponent would be less able to be aggressive in that corner. Our player was able to capitalise on this as now our player realises the opponent has fewer stroke options (i.e. variation) in that corner enabling our player to a) cover the court better, b) save energy, c) control the game better.

    So after the first tight game, our player pulled out a win with a more comfortable margin.


    So that's why one has to play more, watch more, train more, talk to other people and coaches more. Experience counts.

    If Birdy wants to learn more, then the question has to be asked better. It's no use asking other people what scenarios they have because their skill is at a different level. Far better is if Birdy has a game situation that he/she has experienced personally and asks around how to solve it noting the opponents strength and weaknesses.
     
    #10 Cheung, Feb 22, 2014
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2014

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