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CHN/KOR/INA WD pair disqualified from the Olympics

Discussion in 'Olympics LONDON 2012' started by FlamingJam, Aug 1, 2012.

  1. Ningtyas

    Ningtyas Regular Member

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    Greysia Polii said in her Twitter account :
    "We deeply feel sorry to every each of you. I know this is so hard for me an my partner, We have to have a big heart! "

    "No matter what happened. We've done everything we could, we never wanted to be a loser. We want A victory from every game we play on."

    "I'd like to thank you to @bwfmedia n @Olympics committee for the chances so far. We together learn how to make BADMINTON more interesting!"

    https://twitter.com/GreysPolii
     
  2. event

    event Regular Member

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    Actually, it's already a done deal. There will be no Olympic badminton in Rio in 2014!

    (sorry to be a pedanker ;))
     
  3. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    8 disqualified at London Games for trying to lose

    By ROB HARRIS AP Sports WriterAssociated Press

    Posted: 07/31/2012 11:18:40 PM PDT
    August 1, 2012 10:42 PM GMTUpdated: 08/01/2012 03:42:15 PM PDT

    [​IMG]

    Chief Operating Officer Thomas Lund, right, and Deputy President Paisan Rangsikitpho, of the Badminton World Federation, appear during a news conference announcing the elimination of eight female badminton doubles players at the 2012 Summer Olympics, Wednesday, Aug. 1, 2012, in London. The Badminton World Federation announced its ruling after investigating two teams from South Korea and one each from China and Indonesia. It punished them for "not using one's best efforts to win a match" and "conducting oneself in a manner that is clearly abusive or detrimental to the sport" in matches Tuesday night. ((AP Photo/Markus Schreiber))


    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
    LONDON—Eight badminton players at the London Olympics were kicked out of competition Wednesday for trying to lose—a display that drew outrage from fans and organizers who said the women had violated the most sacred stage in sports.

    It appeared to be the first mass disqualification in Olympic history.

    After an unexpected loss by a powerful Chinese doubles team, the eight women appeared to play poorly on purpose to secure a more favorable position in the next phase of the event.

    The feeble play was obvious to fans who attended the matches Tuesday night at Wembley Arena—they chanted, "Off! Off! Off!"—and to incredulous television broadcasters and viewers watching around the world.

    "They're serving fault and fault! They are just hitting the ball into the net!" the BBC's David Mercer said in disbelief. "They are both trying to lose, and that is unforgivable. This is the Olympic Games."

    The eight players included four from South Korea, two from China and two from Indonesia. They were disqualified from competition but allowed to stay at the games—a step lighter than expulsion, the penalty for positive drug tests.

    None of the players was made available for interviews. But after the match one of them, Yu Yang of China, said they were only trying to save energy for the knockout rounds, starting Wednesday.
    Besides dumping serves into the net, both teams made simple errors. The longest rally was only four strokes.


    The scandal was the talk of the sixth day of the Olympics, overshadowing a long-awaited first gold medal for the home country, secured at last by a pair of British rowers at Windsor.

    Though the most serious to date, it's hardly been the only black eye.

    On Monday, a South Korean fencer wept openly while judges took an hour to consider a disputed point, and on Tuesday, doping suspicions engulfed a teenage Chinese gold-medal swimmer.

    For the most part, the blunders have been much smaller—unsightly empty seats on television, lost keys to Wembley Stadium, the South Korean flag flown instead of the North Korean at a soccer match.

    Sebastian Coe, chairman of the London organizing committee, said the badminton scandal was "depressing."

    "Who wants to sit through something like that?" he said.

    Condemnation came quickly from some of the other 10,500 athletes, even from those who said they understood the strategy behind the decision to try to lose.

    Serena Williams, who blistered a Russian opponent at Wimbledon on Wednesday to reach the Olympic quarterfinals, said she understood trying to throw points in practice, "but never, never, never in competition."

    "This is definitely not within the Olympic spirit," said Lin Dan of China, the defending Olympic men's singles badminton champion.

    A player on the Indonesian men's badminton team, Taufik Hidayat, called it a "circus match."

    "I'm happy. I know I'm from Indonesia and the ladies' doubles are from Indonesia, but it's for the sport," he said. "It's not sporting."

    For the badminton players, the moral question was somewhat more complex. Badminton was introduced at the Barcelona Olympics in 1992, but this is the first time it has included a round-robin format before win-or-go-home tournament play.

    The chain of manipulation was set in motion when a team from Denmark unexpectedly beat the second-seeded team in the tournament, from China. By all accounts, that match was decided fairly.

    The loss put the Chinese team on course to face their compatriots, world doubles champions Wang Xiaoli and Yu, in the semifinals, not the finals, as expected.

    Wang and Yu then set out to lose so they would go into the bottom half of the draw. They hardly exerted themselves—and neither did their opponents, the South Koreans, drawing jeers from the crowd and warnings from the umpire.
    Wang and Yu ultimately proved better at losing.

    Later, the other South Korean team tried to lose, this time to the Indonesians, to avoid meeting Wang and Yu in the quarterfinals. The Indonesians apparently had the same idea.

    Early in that match, all four players were warned by the umpire for not trying hard, and the umpire later produced black cards to disqualify both pairs, but the cards were rescinded on a promise of better play.

    The Indonesians ultimately succeeded at losing, and the South Koreans fell into the playoff they did not want with the world champions.

    By midday Wednesday, the Badminton World Federation, the governing body of the sport, had disqualified all eight players from competing at the games. The federation rejected an appeal from South Korea. Indonesia withdrew an appeal.

    The eight are Wang and Yu of China; the four South Koreans, Jung Kyun-eun, Kim Ha-na, Ha Jung-eun and Kim Min-jung; and Meiliana Jauhari and Greysia Polii of Indonesia.

    They were punished by the federation for "not using one's best efforts to win a match" and "conducting oneself in a manner that is clearly abusive or detrimental to the sport."

    The president of the International Olympic Committee, Jacques Rogge, told The Associated Press that the IOC could take the additional step of expelling the athletes. It would mean stripping the players of their credentials and kicking them out of the athletes village. Rogge said he would wait to see what action the national Olympic committees would take.

    "The international federation took the right action in disqualifying the athletes and definitely that was the way to go," Rogge said.

    Craig Reedie, an IOC vice president who is also the former head of the badminton federation, had a stronger response. He suggested the athletes had taken action that undermined sport itself.

    "If you lose the competitive element, then the whole thing becomes a nonsense," he told the AP.

    London organizers sold tickets to the Tuesday badminton events for 20 to 75 pounds, or $31 to $117. They said they had no plans to refund money to fans and had not received requests to do so.

    "You get into all sorts of strange precedents if people aren't satisfied with what they see," said Paul Deighton, chief executive of the London Olympic organizing committee.

    Lin, the Chinese singles badminton player, criticized the introduction of the round-robin format rather than a straight knockout tournament as the main cause of the problem.

    "If you are in a group situation no one would want to meet strong competitors in the first few rounds," Lin said. "It's not their fault. Whoever set this rule should take this into consideration."

    In Olympic beach volleyball, the competition was changed after the 2000 Sydney Games from a double-elimination tournament to a round-robin format followed by a single-elimination tournament to minimize the potential for deceit.

    "Players are happy, because they know nobody can manipulate or cheat," said Angelo Squeo, events director for the sport's governing federation. "I think not trying in badminton, the players should not be blamed. It's a system that has to be discussed."

    The Danish players who won the badminton match that set up the sequence of events said they had seen Chinese players lose on purpose many times—it was just that they had been better at acting the other times.

    "I think they have done a lot by disqualifying them here," said Kamilla Rytter Juhl, who plays doubles with Christinna Pedersen. "I didn't think anything would happen about it."

    The leader of the Indonesian Olympic team also said China had done it many times. India also accused a Japanese doubles pair of trying to throw a match on Tuesday, but those claims were rejected by badminton's governing body.

    The competition continued Wednesday with four previously eliminated teams in the quarterfinals. Those teams were from Russia, Canada, Australia and South Africa.

    In China, an online commentary from the state-run Xinhua News Agency was critical of the players and said what they had done "violates the spirit and ethics of sports" and does not respect the audience.

    Ren Dao, who was playing an afternoon match with colleagues in Beijing, went a step further.
    "This is definitely against the Olympic spirit," he said.


    Stephen Wilson and Gerald Imray in London, and Gillian Wong in Beijing contributed to this report.

    [​IMG]
     
    #203 Loh, Aug 1, 2012
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2012
  4. LazyBuddy

    LazyBuddy Regular Member

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    Please do not further insult the players, even though they did contribute to the mess.

    Seriously, let's do not erase all their life time hard work and achievement with just 1 mistake, be it purely under their own intention, or being ordred, or whatever. 99.9999% of players (including us) will never even get a chance to play on the stage, be it a good performance, a total blown out, or a joke situation like this.

    The reason they get there is due to their hard work, not because of the incident. Whether they cashed on the life dream, or screwed up due to whatever reason, is the aftermath...
     
  5. Aikachan

    Aikachan Regular Member

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    Yu Yang again admitted they threw the match away. Enough already...:(
     
  6. eaglehelang

    eaglehelang Regular Member

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    The rule that says "not using one's best efforts to win a match". They weren't taking it easy, they were trying hard to lose in a blatant way. They were using best efforts to lose that particular match, not win it. Of course in BC we know this kinda thing have been happening for years but BWF did not take action.

    With the President of IOC and the whole world watching the usually wimpy BWF had to take action. Or badminton will be out of the Olympics the next edition
     
    #206 eaglehelang, Aug 1, 2012
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2012
  7. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    2014?

    Can't be an Olympic year. :D:D:D
     
  8. LazyBuddy

    LazyBuddy Regular Member

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    My point is not to defend the players' action, and let them walk away without a scratch. My problem with the "solution", is that only the "lil guys" got push under the bus, while the "fat boss" acting like god to the public.

    BWF (and IOC in a way) created the mess to begin with, where's the blame to themselves to begin with? Please do not give me the crap about, "oh, we thought the players should be perfectly honest to begin with..." Why there's a system, why there's regulation, because a successful system is there to prevent the likely negative outcome. If a committee or a system is set to collect free paycheck, and finger pointing due to poor leadership and planning, then, might as well get rid of the committee 1st...
     
  9. limsy

    limsy Regular Member

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    yuyang wang xiao li and li yongbo admitted their mistake and apologies to badminton fans
    while korea wd get criticed by their own media,say it is a shame
     
  10. LazyBuddy

    LazyBuddy Regular Member

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    I am waiting for BWF's apology for their own share of the mess. But mostly it's a dream any way. The boss will never put himself under the bus, with the nameless "lil guys". :-(
     
  11. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    Olympics-Badminton-Federation throws out Indian protest

    The Economic Times

    LONDON: The World Badminton Federation (BWF) on Wednesday threw out a protest by India, who accused the Japanese women's doubles team of throwing a match against Taiwan at the London Olympics.

    Japan's loss to the Taiwanese on Tuesday effectively eliminated India from the competition and Indian coach Pullela Gopichand said the defeat had been planned.

    The loss resulted in Japan finishing second in their group, thereby avoiding a Chinese team in the next round.

    The Indian protest came on the heels of a scandal that has rocked badminton to its
    core, with four women's doubles pairs - one Chinese, one Indonesian and two from
    South Korea - being disqualified from the Games for throwing matches in order to obtain a more favourable draw.

    BWF Secretary General Thomas Lund said there were no grounds to take the Indian complaint against Japan's Mizuki Fujii and Reika Kakiiwa any further.

    "There has been a complaint and that has been looked into by the referees' team. There's been no referees' report, no umpires' report whatsoever," Lund told a news
    conference.

    "No grounds to take that further, so there's no disciplinary action."

    Gopichand said the Japanese tactic had slipped under the radar because the match was low-profile compared to those involving China, South Korea and Indonesia.

    "Just because it's subtle and the crowd didn't make a noise, the TV didn't make a noise, doesn't mean it didn't happen," he added. "To put it in perspective, the system is first at fault.

    "The players will do whatever they can to win a medal, and if losing means a better draw they will do it. But the first blame lies on the system."
     
  12. kelana

    kelana Regular Member

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    pls back up yr statement with proof!
     
  13. littlebro

    littlebro Regular Member

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    Why people keep bringing up the match-fixing? This match-throwing incident is totally different. I personally hate match-fixing for the 'greater good', but match-throwing in order to get a favorite schedule for their own benefit is in principle fine by me. They just did it way too disrespectfully, which did great damage to our beloved sport and left no choice to IOC and BWF. Disqualification is harsh, especially in the once-in-4-year Olympics.
     
  14. LazyBuddy

    LazyBuddy Regular Member

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    The BWF will be stupid if they drag JP into this mess. The quality of event is already going down to toilet, why even both to sub with another no name, as pissed off another OG giant (in performance, financial and political influence). Therefore, they will try absolutely best to protect the JP pair.

    In another hand, CHN and KOR are the red-hot target by many western nations due to, you know, they are the legit competitor in medal tracker. Of course, they contribute into their own fault and got caught.

    For INA, well, not a power house in OG (no real finance and political influence), no need to be protected like JP...
     
  15. LazyBuddy

    LazyBuddy Regular Member

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    Why? Because ppl are jealous, and love to stir the mud.

    On ESPN, do you ever read 1 positive news about CHN, even though it's the current medal tracker leader (both Gold or total)? All I read is the DQ, doping (even though Ye passed her tests already) and child abuse (sad story for Wu Minxia). Come on, show a bit respect for the front runner. Yes, they may have a few dirt here or there, but it's everyone is not perfect to begin with.

    On the other side, even when Phelps screwed up a few matches (physcial or mental mistakes), he still got painted as the hero. When gymnastics team and men basketball teams clearly performed below standard, they still have moral victory...

    Come on guys, it's ok to take a side, but do not make it too obvious. It's way too obvious to me, as the same magnitude as the stupid DQ cases...
     
  16. kelana

    kelana Regular Member

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    Oops my bad! Badminton won't be staged in 2014 Olympics... it is not yet finalized for the official show in Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics :(:(
     
    #216 kelana, Aug 1, 2012
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2012
  17. thunder.tw

    thunder.tw Regular Member

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    At this point I have to ask you if you've even actually seen the JP / TPE match? Because if you haven't you are just making stuff up at this point.

    I haven't seen that match but I don't believe for a second that the BWF is afraid of Japan. In fact given what's been going on and the attention this is being given in the mainstream media I find it hard to believe that if a review of the match showed any possible manipulation by Japan the BWF wouldn't feel extreme pressure to act. Certainly more pressure than any pressure to appease Japan.
     
  18. hcyong

    hcyong Regular Member

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    Ice badminton.
     
  19. xXazn_romeoXx

    xXazn_romeoXx Regular Member

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    Apparently there was such a thing! I joke you not! It was played at the Leaf's Gardens ;)
     
  20. hcyong

    hcyong Regular Member

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    I agree with you. After all, the motive is to win or go deeper into the tournament. The Japanese may or may not have deliberately thrown their match, but they are in the semis, and the Danes are not.
     

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