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Coming to America!

Discussion in 'USA West' started by anjoooo, Nov 19, 2011.

  1. kwun

    kwun Administrator

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    the definition, organization, and social structure of a "club" in Australia and in the US is very different.

    in the US, a "club" is no more than a gym with courts and a person to look after the front desk and collect money.

    beyond that, there is not any person(s) to organize games or to greet people or anything like that. people who can be totally strangers to each other walks into the huge warehouse with courts inside, the only thing that they talk to is a computer terminal to find out which court they can play in, and then they walk in there to play.

    and when there are sufficient free courts, people just find the next available court to play. and that's it. no one to greet you, no one to make sure that you are finding a good game, no one there to introduce you to people. it is like walking into a night club without knowing anyone.

    granted that the "regulars" do know people but what happens is that they tend to group into their own cliques.

    some clubs as anjoooo mention do have challenge court system and even then, in order to play there you need to find a partner first. most of the time it is not hard as there are always the single person sitting around but it is not guaranteed.

    i sometimes wish the establishments here spend more effort in arranging games for the newcomer or the occasional visitors. but unfortunately that doesn't happen here.

    this is in very much contrast to other more socially sound clubs that i have played in other countries. there is usually a person who is in charge of the "club" where this person go around arranging games for people and making sure that the visitors are not left out.
     
  2. anjoooo

    anjoooo Regular Member

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    Cheers kwun. Yes, it was a bit of a disappointment, however, you live and learn. Next time, we'll just grit our teeth and make the first step.

    Not to worry! Although it would've been great to meet up with you and perhaps other BCers while we were there. Thanks for the offer. Oh well...next time!
     
  3. chris-ccc

    chris-ccc Regular Member

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    The definition is very different

    .
    Yes, I understand... Even in Melbourne, the majority of BC groups playing say that they are clubs, when they are not officially registered with our government.
    .
     
  4. anjoooo

    anjoooo Regular Member

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    Yeah, I think you're right about that.

    So far, I have played in:
    - Australia
    - Malaysia
    - Japan
    - China
    - USA (West)

    All except the US appeared to have clubs which have some sort of organiser/supervisor. I met some interesting people and made many friends through playing badminton at these clubs. Often, they would invite us to have a bite to eat at the local shop after the session (especially in Malaysia and China). It's a great way to meet people who are actually locals whilst on holiday. Of course, it helps immensely when you or one of your party speaks the local language (my gf speaks Chinese)!

    The best experience (so far) I had was in Xi'an, China. Before warming up for a match, my gf warned me that I had better try my best because they were debating whether I was good enough to play with them! It reminded me of those kung fu movies where different schools would challenge each other to duels! Apparently, I passed their "test" and we had lots of good matches. We ended up tagging along for supper afterwards where they introduced me to their local food that I never got to try on the tour. That's the kind of experience I'm after. Although, I guess you shouldn't expect that kind of treatment everywhere.
     
  5. kwun

    kwun Administrator

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    yes! i have some of those in HK and China as well. the groups are more social and tighter than over here in the US.

    it seems like many people in the US just interested in playing and after that they hurry back home to turn in and prepare for work the next day. it is not saying we are all boring ppl as i do know there are some groups who are much more social here, but they tend to be more rare. gym closing late (11pm usually) and not being a big nightlife area also compound the situation.

    i wish i am able to play in so many places as you!
     
  6. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    Do they still play with those archaic plastic shuttlecocks in Leeds? Must check that out as well.....
     
  7. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    Same case in HK. We have groups that sometimes coalesce into clubs but these clubs are probably not registered (after all, there is no system of club registration!). With court space at a premium, it's hard to get an introduction into some groups.
     
  8. tigerlam92

    tigerlam92 Regular Member

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    Yes, at SSF Bingtang it is 26 courts! At the challenge court, you can stay as long as you keep winning and desire to stay on. The longest one I have seen was a pair of my friends winning for over 20 consecutive games! Friday evenings are best. CheersHugh
     
  9. pcll99

    pcll99 Regular Member

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    do u usually go to discuss.com.hk for these clubs?
     
  10. chris-ccc

    chris-ccc Regular Member

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    Groups that sometimes coalesce into clubs

    .
    That's what I have known too. :):):)

    Organisers of groups sometimes coalesce to form clubs. But organisers of groups here at BC should invite ALL BCers, otherwise why be post at BC?

    Also, club registration with the government implies a formation of a formal club. Yes, it costs money to register. And also when registering, insurance for players needs to be taken care of. All this will cost money.

    Groups should state to their players playing with them (playing at their cheaper fees), to realise that players playing with them are playing at their own risks - in other words, organisers are not liable to be sued (when injuries, accidents, etc, ... occur).

    As for me, I would rather charge my players with more fees to cover all the financial situations (so that I won't be sued). :):):)
    .
     
    #30 chris-ccc, Jun 14, 2012
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2012

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