Thanks for visiting us!

Badminton Central is a free community for fans of badminton! If you find anything useful here please consider registering to see more content and get involved with our great community users, it takes less than 15 seconds! Everybody is welcome here.

Click here for a FREE account!

consider this rule ...

Discussion in 'General Forum' started by badrad, Apr 18, 2003.

  1. badrad

    badrad Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2002
    Messages:
    1,650
    Likes Received:
    2
    Occupation:
    currently unemployed
    Location:
    Surrey, Canada
    have you ever wondered why there is a doubles service end line that is shorter than the court length and different from the singles service end line? other than a possible advantage to the server for added real estate for the receiver to cover there doesn't seem to be any reason for the location of this service line.

    this line is superfluous after the service and often confusing to new players to the sport. so why not simply remove it and have just one end service line.

    Your thoughts to this?
     
  2. valourarc

    valourarc Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2003
    Messages:
    81
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Professional
    Location:
    Ontario
    I think the purpose is to make it harder for the server to score points. If I could serve deep, the receiver would be on the defensive at least 90% of the time and since in doubles you have a partner, that would make putting the shuttle away pretty easy when you have serve.
     
  3. Phil

    Phil Regular Member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2002
    Messages:
    547
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Lawyer
    Location:
    Ontario
    My thoughts:

    1) The receiver also has to cover the alley, so they are still covering about the same area of court.
    2) If the doubles service line was the same as the singles, then flick serves would probably end up being overpowered. They wouldn't be outright aces, but it would put the other team on the defensive, since the receiver would start out further back to receive.
    3) With the doubles service line where it is now, it places importance on the skill and accuracy of the serve. This also helps make it a more intense and faster-paced game.
    4) Besides, it's not a very hard concept at all. Must serve before this line in doubles, after the serve, it means nothing. Simple as that.

    Phil
     
  4. LoveJoy

    LoveJoy Regular Member

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2003
    Messages:
    89
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Canada
    I consider it to be the same type of rule and thinking as in Tennis...two (2) chances in serving. Don't worry hit it as hard as possible if the ball goes out..no worries..still have an extra serve!
     
  5. LazyBuddy

    LazyBuddy Regular Member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2002
    Messages:
    10,243
    Likes Received:
    13
    Occupation:
    Engineer
    Location:
    New York, US
    Agree with most above issues.

    I think with an extra "attacker" getting ready on serving side, if the serve end line is way deep back, it's will be extra harder for the receiving end to have a quick, high quality return to even get into the game.

    To get the game be more intensive, instead of a possible 10:0 run from serving side, current rule works better. It will be harder to put the receiving end way too much back, and need extra control skill to get opponents in trouble, but not a fault.
     
  6. Phil

    Phil Regular Member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2002
    Messages:
    547
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Lawyer
    Location:
    Ontario
    I have to disagree with this. I've read before that the serve differs in attitude between Tennis and Badminton in that in Tennis, the serve is an aggresive shot, and is meant to be able to score outright points. In Badminton, the serve is mainly to just start the game. The rules such as keeping it below the waist/wrist are there so that the serve does not become a weapon.

    I was at a tournament a couple months back, and in one game, a player was against someone much stronger than him, but he started using a very aggresive drive serve which scored him many points and he won the first game. All the players could see it was illegal. The opponent called a service judge (who happened to know nothing about badminton and illegal serves), and eventually won. So as you can see, keeping serves non-aggressive helps the quality of the game.

    Phil
     
  7. Winex West Can

    Winex West Can Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2002
    Messages:
    2,396
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Hi Tech
    Location:
    Vancouver, Canada
    Given that you have two people covering each side of the court, if you can serve long and wide, the receiver will be in a very defensive position to make a good return (most likely a defensive clear) so giving the serving side an added advantage to win points easily (in fact, the serve might not even be lost for the entire game!).

    I think I just rephrased Valourarc's post :D
     
  8. ronk

    ronk Regular Member

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2002
    Messages:
    1,211
    Likes Received:
    20
    Location:
    USA
    The reason for this rule originally was to make sure that the receiving area was the same for singles and doubles. In singles, the service court is thin and long and the service area is about the same as in doubles where the service court is thick and short. The strategies that developed in service were developed based on the service rule. The rule was not designed to make the double's serve more aggressive. Probably, when the rule was formulated, the standard of the game was much lower and service was not the potent weapon it is now, even with the below the waist service rule. However, under the traditional service rules, players developed various tactics and strategies to gain advantages within the rules and we hence have the general short serve in doubles and the long serve in singles. The backhand flick serve was developed to gain an advantage, and the current backhand serve in singles also developed to gain and advantage or (in this case) to minimize a disadvantage.

    Ron
     
  9. LazyBuddy

    LazyBuddy Regular Member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2002
    Messages:
    10,243
    Likes Received:
    13
    Occupation:
    Engineer
    Location:
    New York, US
    Can't agree. This 2 sports are very different.

    In tennis, most pts were decided in very few shot, only a few were about numerous rallies. The serve in tennis is a very useful attack weapon, can be used as a major scoring options for players have height and strength.

    In badminton (not club level, but higher lvl), u very seldom see server could score pts very easily just on serve. Serve mostly being used to make sure the receiving end won't being to attack easily. The beauty in badminton is strenght and height won't be as important as in tennis, and many good plays were scored after numerous of rallies.

    Another pt, tennis serve is "wait for ur turn". So, receiving end won't be wipped out, even if the server has dominating serves. Receiver can wait for his/her turn to serve, and try to score pts.

    In badminton, winning side will keep serve and keep scoring. If u make serve in badminton to be a deadly weapon by changing rules, then, the side serve first will get great advantage to win even before the game starts.
     

Share This Page