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Dealing with shots hit directly at your body

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by base615, Dec 14, 2009.

  1. base615

    base615 Regular Member

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    Hi Guys,

    First post here and I couldn't find search terms to get any answers on this so apologies if it's been discussed before and feel free to just link a previous thread.

    I'm a rank beginner so I have many many problems with my game but while I understand the theory of footwork to the corners and edges of the court I can't understand how to deal with a shot coming directly towards your body at chest level (which seems to happen a lot to me).

    I find I don't have the speed to move to the side and make a balanced forehand / backhand shot so end up just sticking my racket in front of me resulting in an out of control block (usually off the frame).

    Any advice you guys have would be appreciated.

    Cheers,

    Craig
     
  2. Gollum

    Gollum Regular Member

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    Hi Craig, welcome to the forum. :)

    Shots to your body are inherently difficult in terms of hitting technique. This is why they are used a lot by the attacking side in doubles.

    There are two main ideas for dealing with shots to your body:

    • Take the shuttle out in front of you
    • Learn how to change grip

    If you let the shuttle get close to your body, then it will be almost impossible to play a good shot. Instead, try to play the shot at full relaxed reach, out in front of you.

    You will need to change your grip -- specifically, you'll need to become quick at switching towards a panhandle grip for forehands and a thumb grip for backhands. These grips help you to direct the shuttle straight across the net, when it's at chest height and out in front of you.

    Note that these two grips should never be used as your "default" grip. They should only be used in special situations, such as when the shuttle is coming to your body at chest height.

    You may also need to crouch down a bit, depending on the height of the shuttle.

    As a first step, I recommend having a look at my badminton grips guide. You don't necessarily need to read it all, but the first few pages should be useful.
     
  3. base615

    base615 Regular Member

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    Thanks mate, makes a lot of sense. I'll definately read the guide. I'm obsessive so I'm sure I'll end up reading the whole lot :)
     
  4. Mark A

    Mark A Regular Member

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    Agree with Gollum 100% - taking these shots requires a really fast change from the neutral (relaxed) grip to the backhand or forehand grip. I myself prefer take these on the backhand, so I practice them that way and I can hit them either straight or crosscourt; the crosscourt version looks weird, almost an upside-down backhand, but it works. Whenever I fail a defensive shot, though, it's ALWAYS down to getting caught between grips:).

    Just do some drill (you don't even need to be on court, you can do it while waiting between games) going from neutral to BH/FH grip as fast as you can while bringing the racket head foward; it's got to the point now where I'm loitering around between games and my racket is twiddling around in my hand of its own accord as I'm so used to this form of practise...
     
  5. base615

    base615 Regular Member

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    Great advice guys, cheers. I understand the theory now which means I can practice it
     

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