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Do you prefer isometric or oval head rackets?

Discussion in 'Racket Recommendation / Comparison' started by ttktom, Sep 29, 2003.

?

do you prefer Isometric or Oval?

  1. Isometric

    2 vote(s)
    100.0%
  2. Oval

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  1. phandrew

    phandrew Regular Member

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    You should use the Isometric series instead of using Armortec series if you want to measure the frame area of Iso rackets.
     
  2. cooler

    cooler Regular Member

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    i haven't followed all of the posts here but it seem taneepak is generalizing about iso vs oval base on the ideal dimension specificed in the bwf rule book. Since most users don't choose or compare rackets with ideal dimensions, one must deal with a real world comparison, which in this case, your statement are valid.
     
  3. taneepak

    taneepak Regular Member

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    Armortec series, according to Yonex, employs an isometric square head shape. Other Yonex series, with the exception of the Carbonex series and another cheaper Cab series with an enlarged "squareness of the frame, also employ an isometric square head shape.
    To avoid twisting what I say, I suggest you check with your regional Yonex distributor re the relative head size or area of the cab racquets vs those with iso sq head shape if you are interested. Of course you can also check with Yonex HQ in Japan. This is better than hearing it from me.
     
  4. taneepak

    taneepak Regular Member

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    We can try the following experiment:
    Get a 1" wooden board and cut two holes through it. One hole is a 1" square hole, the other a 1" diameter round hole. Now pull out the two pegs, one square 1" square and the other one a round peg diameter 1".
    We have now two holes and two pegs. First try to put the round peg into the square hole. It goes in with no problem. Next insert the square peg into the round hole. It doesn't go in, just like what others say that you cannot put a square peg into a round hole!
    What happens if you "cheat", say by drilling another smaller 1/2" square hole, and then try to put the 1" round peg into this 1/2" square hole? It doesn't go in. How is it possible that a round peg is larger than the new square hole?
    I think this is the gist of the oval vs iso story.:cool:
     
  5. taneepak

    taneepak Regular Member

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    Sorry for an omission of a word. It should be a 1" thick wooden board.
     
  6. cooler

    cooler Regular Member

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    erhmm, square is not isometric, nor a circle is an oval.
    I have never been offered to do this IQ test before in my life, you must have felt excited to pass that test.
     
  7. taneepak

    taneepak Regular Member

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    That is the problem with you-not being able to see the forest for the trees.
     
  8. silentheart

    silentheart Regular Member

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    1) Like Cooler sad, Oval is not a circle. Nor a square is ISO.
    2) No one disagree with you on given 2 objects, one with bigger surface area and one with smaller surface area, the one with bigger surface area will have more air resistance.
    What we have problem with is your claim that ISO frame always has bigger frame size. I am telling you that is not necessary true. Manufacture can make the racquet anyway they want as long as it fits the rule of badminton. I ask you to measure MP99 and Cab30ms because they are design and produced around the same time. Both have almost the same feature except frame shape. Both are top of line model. If you care to go out and compare the 2, you will see MP99 has smaller frame size than Cab30ms. Also, the cross section of the frame plays far bigger role the the frame size. To make a proper comparison of iso vs oval shape, you need to limit other factors such as frame size, frame cross section and other factors. That is what I have been trying to tell you and you finally agreed on few post back. However, you pull the crap on the hole and peg stuff, that really just show you have no idea on doing any anvance experiemnt and logical thinking. No wonder the racquet your design were off spec and people need to send it back to you for adjustment. This will be my last post on this subject.
    Sorry, I really don't know what too say when you run into a tree and you thought you saw the forest after you wake up.
     
  9. cooler

    cooler Regular Member

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    yes, we don't see things eye to eye. You are still playing with blocks.
     
  10. taneepak

    taneepak Regular Member

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    Pls note that when I compare oval with iso, I do qualify it with AOTBE (All other things being equal). This is the only basis you can compare. Otherwise it is like getting that round 1" diameter peg and trying to insert it into that 1/2 inch square hole, instead of inserting it into that 1" square hole.
     
  11. cooler

    cooler Regular Member

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    tell us where to buy a square frame racket Taneepak....
     
  12. silentheart

    silentheart Regular Member

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    So, does AOTBE mean frame size the same too? If that is the case, what is your point?
     
  13. taneepak

    taneepak Regular Member

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    Ok, let me start again. We are now talking about frame shape, an oval shape versus an isometric shape, and nothing else. With this in mind and AOTBE, an oval shape will have a smaller area than an isometric shape.
    Let me explain how we design racquet frames and then their profiles. First we take the overall length and the overall width of the frame, with regard to the inside points. Overall length and width means the longest path from point to point at its widest part.
    Let us say we design a racquet with an overall frame length (or some call it height) of say 240mm and an overall width of 190mm, at thier widest. With these 4 points we then decide whether we want an oval, an enlarged or slightly more "squarish" oval, an isometric with a square shape at the shoulders, sometimes with a slight variation in the extent of its squarness.
    We then decide on the costs which determine the materials to be used. Then we determine the frame's profile, materials, and costs. Wider profiles are cheaper to produce because cheaper materials can be used but yet will produce good power, albeit at the expense of being more ponderous. Also we play with swingweight factors to produce power, but as always they do not come without some disadvantages. Another factor to consider but is only appropriate for players with very fast hand speed is the portion of the frame from the frame waist location down into and including the throat and T joint. Better materials are necessary for this 'section' for that great whippy feel plus of course higher costs. But many players may not like this type of design because they say fatter profile frames give them more power.
     
  14. taneepak

    taneepak Regular Member

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    Whilst the world is on standard time (1" hole), Cooler is lost in the nether world of 1/2 inch. You still cannot see the forest for the trees.
     
  15. chongkiatz

    chongkiatz Regular Member

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    so conclusion is iso better or oval better??
     
  16. vrage

    vrage New Member

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    Isometric.(This is from experience)

    the reason?
    well, giving a reply to a smash becomes more powerful with an Iso when the point of contact is near the tip. this prevents the opponent from finishing.

    although the difference is slight, switching from oval to iso was a task for me :p
     
  17. chongkiatz

    chongkiatz Regular Member

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    so Oval head is total a rubbish now?? =.=" just bought wilson nCode 9000 .. i think it's oval head racket...
     
  18. cappy75

    cappy75 Regular Member

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    Does it really matter what racquet your opponent use to beat you? You lose to the player, not the racquet.
     
  19. weeyeh

    weeyeh Regular Member

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    Well said. On a more positive note, if I win, I would love to take more credit than my racket :p.
     
  20. CarbonexFan

    CarbonexFan Regular Member

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    I think the answers are based on two different questions.

    1. Is isometric head better than oval rackets?
    2. Do you prefer isometric or oval head rackets

    In the first case, I would say yes. Given the same specific racket and the only difference is the head shape, an isometric head can give you a greater sweet spot and a larger margin to play predictable/accurate. Off the sweet spot result in less power, and can result in a not expected flight. Please not that a iso frame will not give you more power because the string lengths in the sweet spots are the same. The number of strings that have the same length is just higher.

    The second answer for me is depending on the opponent. I prefer to play with an oval racket for normal use. I prefer isometric racket playing against good and better players to afford a larger error margin.
     
    #380 CarbonexFan, Oct 3, 2008
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2008

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