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Does doing "pre-stretch" method strains ur racket?

Discussion in 'Badminton Stringing Techniques & Tools' started by lightsmash, Nov 8, 2006.

  1. lightsmash

    lightsmash Regular Member

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    As it has been previously discussed that by pre-stretching, the tension will hold longer. the drawback is that the repulsion will not be as good as normal stringing.
    my question:
    will a racket's frame be more prone to collapsing when u do pre-stretch stringing?
    for example, like maybe u can probably string 30lbs on mp100, but when u do pre-stretch stringing and 30lbs as well. the mp100 breaks.
     
  2. Quasimodo

    Quasimodo Regular Member

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    I suppose this is true simply because when you prestretch the string, the resulting stringbed is stiffer (i.e., less tension loss). For instance, all else equal, if you don't prestretch and you've to string at 30 lbs. to get the result that you like, then if you prestretch, then you may get the same result at 26--28 lbs. Because the string would stretch more after being installed in the first case than in the second. IOW, the racquet would really be under a stress of 26--28 lbs. string job after everything's said and done.

    If you prestretch and string at 30 lbs., then the racquet would be under more stress although still not quite exactly 30 lbs. because the string would still stretch, only less.

    FWIW, YMMV.
     
  3. LazyBuddy

    LazyBuddy Regular Member

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    In theory, yes, as the actual tension lost is minimized, which results into higher tension in the final product.

    However, in reality, unless you are working with extremely high tension, a decent condition racket should hold up. Most of the breakage are due to bad string job (incorrect mounting, tension, pattern, etc) or mis-usage (clash, bump on the floor, etc).
     

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