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Does Graphene racket means it will never break?

Discussion in 'Badminton Rackets / Equipment' started by SSSSNT, Feb 16, 2013.

  1. SSSSNT

    SSSSNT Regular Member

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    For example, the Victor Thruster K 8000 has multi layered graphene on its frame. It is said that one gram of graphene can bear five tons of weight. Clearly we cannot create a force that much with our bare hands even if we try. Is this then the end of racket breaking, at least at the frame before they come out with full graphene racket? Do someone care to test this theory? :p
     
  2. SolsticeOfLight

    SolsticeOfLight Regular Member

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    It can bear 5 tones of weight as long as the weights are placed in the right position. I guess it's similar to carbon fiber; strong in some directions, weak in others.
     
  3. visor

    visor Regular Member

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    My guess is there's less than 0.01g of this stuff in the racket... so 0.05 tons that it can support. ;) :p
     
  4. SolsticeOfLight

    SolsticeOfLight Regular Member

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    And they only put it at 3+9 o'clock and blahblahblah.
     
  5. greblu

    greblu Regular Member

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    Huh? Isn't multi layered graphene just Graphit?

    Graphene is a single layer material, it is the only single layer material that can exist on earth.
     
  6. SolsticeOfLight

    SolsticeOfLight Regular Member

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    This has been mentioned elsewhere.
    You're assuming that graphite is pure graphene put in to layers. This isn't the case, as you have structural anomalies, even if you wouldn't have chemical anomalies.
     
  7. phili

    phili Regular Member

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    I don't get why there should be any major structural anomalies since the graphene layers are very stable. You got any source for that?

    If you just have a few layers of graphene you call it "multi-layer" graphene because it still has kind of the properties of graphene but weaker. If you have more than a few it's just graphite.
     
  8. SolsticeOfLight

    SolsticeOfLight Regular Member

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    At the atomic scale, any structural anomaly is major. Take a metal of your choice, for example. A model of a metal without any structural anomalies would show the metal to be 10 times stronger than reality. The fact is that small (atomic-level) exclusions are responsible for this big discrepancy between theory and reality. More detail goes on to explain why inclusions in metal make it stronger, but you should go take some science classes if you're really interested.

    Of course, you could also test the strength of a pile of graphene and compare it to a lump of graphite. Or you could consult wikipedia, or numerous other electronic or printed sources. Graphene made quite a stir, winning a Nobel Prize, so there'll be plenty of materials to consult.
     
  9. phili

    phili Regular Member

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    I'm quite familiar with solid state physics. My question was rather why there should be any faults in the structure of the graphite planes but there are none in graphene. Since the interaction between two planes is very little this does not make much sense to me.
     
    #9 phili, Feb 17, 2013
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2013
  10. SolsticeOfLight

    SolsticeOfLight Regular Member

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    If you read the wikipedia page on graphene, you'll see that two separate layers can have very tangible effects on each other.

    And there are faults in graphite because that is reality and there aren't in graphene because that's its definition. Introduce faults in graphene and it is no longer graphene. Remove all faults from graphite and you have graphene.

    Instead of complaining to me, I suggest you educate yourself with the enormous amounts of knowledge available on the repository known as the internet.
     

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