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Drive serve

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by Ramil, Aug 21, 2004.

  1. Ramil

    Ramil New Member

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    I use low serve, flick serve and high serve when play badminton.
    What is drive serve? How is it done and when is it used?
     
  2. taneepak

    taneepak Regular Member

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    A drive serve is an attacking serve. To execute this shot, you have to stand a bit further behind the servic line, so that the shuttle will pass the net at a flatter angle. You do the drive serve only with your forehand. A drive serve can be effective against a receiver who leaves his overhead position unguarded. There is a temptation to cheat by serving high to achieve a flatter serve, which is more deadly, but this would be a fault. :D
     
  3. cooler

    cooler Regular Member

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    erm, it can be and more often done by backhand serve. :rolleyes:
     
  4. other

    other Regular Member

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    works better if you are quite tall as well
     
  5. LazyBuddy

    LazyBuddy Regular Member

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    I think I excute this serve more on backhand. Of course, i need to further step back (1 ft from T), in order to avoid any possible argument in serve fault...

    Of course, my serve might be still too slow to a lot of you, so, maybe my serve is more like "high fly" serve??? :eek: :D
     
  6. nobleman

    nobleman New Member

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    I use it exclusively on my backhand as well. If you get the line and length right it does become very useful. The line is more important though, if you can get the shuttle between the small gap of the player and the center line it becomes very hard to retrieve and obviously the lower the better.
     
  7. taneepak

    taneepak Regular Member

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    The backhand drive serve just doesn't have the power or speed of the forehand drive serve. However, the backhand high flick serve is very effective.
     
  8. Chun

    Chun Regular Member

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    Uhh, not sure if this is still true but I thought when serving, if the shuttle travels flat and not upwards when crossing the net, it's a fault?? I was sure that ibf instituted this rule to prevent some of the tall players who can bypass the racquet below the waist rule to take advantage of their height to serve flat or down.
     
  9. taneepak

    taneepak Regular Member

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    Let us put things in perspective. The rules say the flight of the shuttle shall be upwards from the server's racquet to pass over the net. The lowest part of the net, the centre, is 5 feet high. I don't think there are many tall players with 5 feet high waist; and the shuttle must be below the waist when a server hits it.
    Even if you are 7' tall, I doubt your waist is 5' high, as that would leave you with a mere 2' upper body. :D
     
  10. odjn

    odjn Regular Member

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    what are effective replys against a drive serve? Especially if i can predict it?
     
  11. kwun

    kwun Administrator

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    i played this guy the other day with a brilliant backhand drive serve. the best one i have seen whether backhand or forehand. it was 1) well disguised, looks just like normal serve, 2) fast, spins and goes straight above your left shoulder thus very awkward place to reply, 3) lands a foot before the double baseline.

    it caught me offguard for a quite few times. it was very fast and awkward so it was hard to clear it or drive it back. besides this guy has a crazily sharp smash and clearing wasn't a very good idea (it was a mixed game as well).

    the solution, a fast sharp block, use the momentum of the incoming shuttle, bounce it back to the other side of the net, downwards. after a couple of try, i was able to block it very fast and just clipping the net. as the service was so fast, the reply was also and caught the net player off guard a couple of times.
     
  12. Sliced Drop

    Sliced Drop Regular Member

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    What no one has stated is that a drive serve is intended to fly _fast_ past the receiver, not _high_ over the receiver like a flick serve. As such it is nearly always served directly to the rear T, and rarely passes over much of the receiving box on the way.

    The best counter to a drive server is to receive slightly futher back behind the T and to step towards the center as soon as the service is made. This should put you under the (low) shuttle and in a position to play an attacking shot.

    Of course, this leaves you more open to wide short serves, but they're usually easier to recover.
     
  13. SystemicAnomaly

    SystemicAnomaly Regular Member

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    My advise is to forget the drive serve. The badminton serve was never intended to be an offensive (attacking) stroke as it is tennis. The best you can hope for is to deceive (with a LEGAL flick serve) a receiver who might be a bit too aggressive.

    Easily MORE than 95% of all drive serves that I have witnessed have been ILLEGAL strokes. The problem with ALMOST all drive serves is the postion of the head of the racket at contact with respect to the hand holding the racket (NOTE: I am NOT saying anything about the waist).

    Check out Diagram D and Law 9.1.6 at the IBF web site:

    http://www.intbadfed.org/Portal/documents/laws2002.pdf

    Note particularly the use of the word "DISCERNIBLY" in this rule.
     
  14. registered

    registered Regular Member

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    I use the drive serve to back off cheating players, i have a bit of an advantage since i am 6'1, also i tippy toe when i execute this serve, and i've been taugh to choke up on the racket to get even more of a flat serve to prevent an offensive return. I do stand back about a foot or so... Sometimes it works... but if you playing with someone with a good reaction, you better be on your guard. In this case i usually aim for thier backhand. For people that don't have a high waist you could hit a drive fast enough that it just makes it to the back line but it's dangerous that he could smash at you =)
     
  15. taneepak

    taneepak Regular Member

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    I believe there is a difference between the flick service and the drive service. The flick service depends on fast execution and is more effective if delivered near the front service line. Its trajectory is high. Keeping the receiver guessing is the hallmark of a flick service. It can be served forehand or backhand. The drive service is an attacking service and is executed further behind the front service line so that the shuttle will pass the net at a flatter angle, as distinct from a flick service. It also does not keep the receiver guessing as its intent is clear, as the drive service is hit with much more backlift. It is more effective with the forehand because of the higher backlift and flatter trajectory. The drive service using the backhand looks more like a high service, as it lacks the high backlift and the flattish trajectory.
    I stand to be corrected. :D
     
  16. aznphi1osopher

    aznphi1osopher Regular Member

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    tipy toeing is actualy illegal accordin it the ibf , if you have both feet up. one foot must always remain flat to the ground, during serves. Having both up is technically illegal.
     
  17. SystemicAnomaly

    SystemicAnomaly Regular Member

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    Heels up!

    I couldn't find anything in the Laws of Badminton at the IBF site that disallowed standing on tip toes. Can you cite the where this is mentioned?

    The closest thing that I could find is Law 9.1.3 which states: " In a correct service: some part of both feet of the server and receiver shall remain in contact with the surface of the court in a stationary position from the start of the service until the service is delivered..."

    This law does not disallow standing on tip toe at all.

    http://www.worldbadminton.net/Portal/documents/laws2002.pdf
     
  18. Neil Nicholls

    Neil Nicholls Regular Member

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    Bend your knees more, so that you crouch a bit lower than usual.
    Have your racquet up, ready, facing the shuttle.
     
  19. SystemicAnomaly

    SystemicAnomaly Regular Member

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    Crouching tiger...

    Yes, I find that bending the knees more that usual is helpful in defending against a drive serves. Drive serves are particularly effective against taller players. Therefore crouching makes a tall player shorter & somewhat less susceptible to drive serves.

    As I said before, MOST drives serves that I've witnessed are ILLEGAL. If a player uses an illegal serve to their advantage more than once against me in a game, I will inform that their serve is not legal. If they continue to serve in the same manner, I will use the crouched position to help me deal with their UNFAIR advantage.

    I tend to decline to play with players who have a known history of using illegal serves to their advantage even after being warned about those serves.
     
  20. taneepak

    taneepak Regular Member

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    I would venture as far as to say most effective drive serves are illegal. They would not be as effective if they were executed the correct and proper way. Here are the facts. To be effective the drive serve must be as flat as possible, and must be executed as near the front service line as possible. These requirements make it very difficult to do it the legal way. After all, you cannot execute a drive serve using the legal method-below the waist-that will give you a flatter service than one executed above the waist. Also, moving much further back, to avoid the not higher than waist serve rule, when executing the drive serve, defeats the time element and renders the drive serve ineffective and much easier to handle. An illegal forehand drive serve from the front service line is almost impossible to handle because of the shorter distance. :D
     

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