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Electronic coach!

Discussion in 'General Forum' started by Aleik, Oct 11, 2003.

  1. Aleik

    Aleik Regular Member

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    Let's not get encumbered by detail...(is the taxma
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    We've all seen our coaches and top players show us the "perfect" technique for each shot and movement, but unless we have top spatial awareness and full concentration, we find it difficult to coordinate our movements...it takes at least a few months to hone it to the correct standard. Here's a crazy idea of mine, but one that's interesting for a change.

    You know those computer aided machines that mass produce other things, moving about based on the product's pre-determined dimensions and design...bear with me a while!

    Well what if there was a similar machine which used the anatomical dimenions of a human being to physically coach him/her the "perfect" technique?

    Small rubber pads (like on weight machines) would be tied/attached to each key joint in the anatomy, and 10 large ones would go on the upper and lower arms and legs, and the back of the hands. These pads would go on the end of "pushing and pulling" electronic mechanisms.

    The way this would work is by creating multiple lever systems by applying forces to each pad at the appropriate time. This is effectively doing the muscles' work, but of course, doing the work precisely.

    How would it be successful? By repeating this perfect form over and over; more effective than imagery or shadow play, because you KNOW that the technique is correct. The practice of imagery would work very well in conjuction with this type of training.

    If the CAM has a "brain", it can add a gravity factor for jumping, etc., and even use anatomical statistics to decide which technique suits the player's physical category.

    Well, OK. It's not that interesting, but interesting from a pioneering point of view. I know it would take millions and years to set up, but would anyone here suggest it to their Computer Aided Manufacturing firm they just happen to work for?

    Aleik.
     
  2. badrad

    badrad Regular Member

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    the do use these already for runners and some sports. the running platform is simpler in that they have the subject run in a straight line on a treadmill. they analyse their body and joint movements and provide feedback to correct or optimize their movements.

    badminton may be tougher to set up, but not impossible, due to our 3 D nature of our movements.
     
  3. Rohly

    Rohly Regular Member

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    I think it sounds pretty impossible to me but it would be good if it worked. What would happen if it went crazy and made the player move all over the place.
     
  4. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    so who do want to play like today? like Taufik, Kim DM, Candra, Peter Gade, JR?:p

    That would be great, plug myself into the playstation 2 or Xbox and see what happens:cool:
     
  5. Aleik

    Aleik Regular Member

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    Exactly...remember The Matrix where he had all these different fighting styles to choose from in the training simulator...well this would be the same, except we plug our muscles into the activity instead of our brain.

    It would give us first hand experience of techniques without our (sometimes slow and indocile) brains as the middleman. Maybe over time the levers would apply less force, allowing the muscles to do more work, and giving a score for the trainee's accuracy.

    What I forgot on the way was that CAM involves several stages of assembly - not everything being put together at once - so yes, all these parts moving about would cause problems...unless all the parts were magnetically repulsive or something. Even then it's a lot to ask.

    I don't know much about professional badminton, but I saw Candra Wijaya play onc, and he was really exciting. His style wouldn't suit big ol' me though. :rolleyes:

    Aleik
     

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