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external t-joint rackets good or bad ??

Discussion in 'Badminton Rackets / Equipment' started by dindodindo, Jun 27, 2010.

  1. dindodindo

    dindodindo New Member

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    what does the external t-joint do ?

    need help..
    i have a wish racket(PRO-750) special flat shape shaft



    with external t-joint is that good ?
    :):):):):):):confused::confused::confused::confused::confused:
     
  2. dindodindo

    dindodindo New Member

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    are they good or bad please explain:confused:
     
  3. Sketchy

    Sketchy Regular Member

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    Bad.
    Rackets used to be made in two separate parts (frame and shaft) which were joined with an external T-joint.
    Nowadays they are made in one-piece, with an internal T-joint for added strength and torsional stability.

    Regardless of whether the T-joint itself actually makes all that much difference, the only rackets you can buy now with external T-joints, are very cheap, low quality rackets.
     
  4. asurada

    asurada Regular Member

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    wrong and very wrong. look at gosen racquets. the soft and whipping feel is unmatched by any yonex racquet in production. the closest one is probably mp88.
     
  5. Sketchy

    Sketchy Regular Member

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    Sorry, but if you look at any major brand (Yonex/Carlton/Victor/Li Ning/etc) only their very low-end models use external T-joints.
    Obviously there are going to be a few exceptions if you look hard enough. Also, there are probably old high-end models which used external T-joints, but which are still very good rackets.
     
  6. LazyBuddy

    LazyBuddy Regular Member

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    Maybe the OP should specify the racket model instead of the general design. There are tons of different brands out there, someone's meat is someone else's poison.
     
  7. dindodindo

    dindodindo New Member

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    anyone know about the wishsport brand ? someone told me that it was a good racket .
     
  8. dindodindo

    dindodindo New Member

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    uhm.. one more question .. will external t-jointed rackets break easily ? and other things that might happen.. thxn
     
  9. SharpEye

    SharpEye Regular Member

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    Is this a joke? If it is ignore my analysis... lol..

    Well... external T Joints are a old fashioned concept. Normally found on cheaper rackets, they are a cheap way for manufacturers to create a strong bond between the racket shaft and head.

    Positives:
    Cheaper racket cost, and in turn hopefully cheaper retail price. Strong and sturdy. Heavier at head.

    Negatives:
    Heavier at head. To an extent reduces aerodynamics of the racket. Can loosen and allow head to move. Too cheaply made will mean the can come off.

    Whether it is good or bad is not so much an issue as long as your racket matches and enables you to play at your full potential :-D

    Hope this Helps :)
     

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