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Eye injuries in badminton

Discussion in 'Injuries' started by visor, Nov 22, 2012.

  1. visor

    visor Regular Member

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    Hasn't happened to me as I wear glasses, but unfortunately I've seen this happen 3x to others when playing in the past few months. Fortunately, the injuries were superficial and not serious.

    Several ways to avoid them.

    1. Wear glasses or eye protection! Simple as that.

    2. If you're at the front and your opponent is about to net kill, TURN OR COVER YOUR FACE with your racket immediately. Safer to concede that point than to try to save it. At that close distance, you have no time to react, the hit will be very forceful and you can't depend on your opponent to have the skill to avoid hitting you.

    3. If your partner is behind you and is just about to hit a shot, NEVER TURN BACK TO LOOK. Again at that close distance, you have no time to react, the hit will be forceful, and you can't depend on your partner to have the skill to avoid hitting you.

    Again, be safe on the court as we all want to play this sport for a long time.
     
    #1 visor, Nov 22, 2012
    Last edited: Nov 22, 2012
  2. phili

    phili Regular Member

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    Glasses don't protect you from everything. A friend of mine got hit from a net kill and her glasses broke. Some parts even got stuck in her skin, fourtunately no eye damage though.
    Anyway good to mention the dangers of playing badminton ;)
     
  3. R20190

    R20190 Regular Member

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    Very true, I smashed a shuttle at a chap and his glasses broke, lens fell out etc. I did offer to pay for them as I know how much they can cost in the UK (I wear glasses myself) but he was fine with it.

    But yeah, eye protection is an injury thats often overlooked.
     
  4. visor

    visor Regular Member

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    Hmmm, yeah... I always wear glasses with plastic lenses... so yeah, no glasses made from glass as that could shatter.
     
  5. Cycril

    Cycril Regular Member

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    although wearing a pair of glasses are safer but i found it very annoying in game as my glasses keep falling down :crying:
     
  6. Avenger

    Avenger Regular Member

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    got my lesson today.
    injured by my partner
    I was about to take the shuttle where I cannot reached it. stopped a little bit and bam, my partner hit the bird and the bird hit my right eye
    my vision (the right eye) was blurred for 30 minutes
    then when I used ice to cool down my eyes, my vision became full of white flashy ray or something (sorry can't explain it better than this). most likely because I used the ice and it is kinda distracting my vision (cold and all)

    drank my high blood pressure medicine (to lower the pressure to my eye). went to eye hospital straight away. today is sunday, got no luck with the doctor.
    then I drank a pain killer pill, went to sleep, and then now, 8 hours later I am able to see normally, but kinda hard to see in the dark
    will go to my eye doctor tomorrow
     
  7. visor

    visor Regular Member

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    ^ Yikes. Make sure your eye doctor checks the inside of your eye to rule out anything serious like retinal detachment. Meanwhile rest and don't exert yourself. Hope all goes well.
     
  8. Avenger

    Avenger Regular Member

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    now I understand why I cannot see well in the dark
    my right eyes sees the world in red (like you are using red glasses). when it is bright, it is not apparent, but when in the darkness, my left eye saw it was white shade, but my right eye saw it was red shade (I mean bright red)
     
  9. visor

    visor Regular Member

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    Red vision? That's a bad sign. Means internal bleeding. Make sure you go to emergency now! :eek:
     
    #9 visor, Dec 16, 2012
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2012
  10. gundamzaku

    gundamzaku Regular Member

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    normal reading glasses and safety glasses which can withstand a certain amount of pressure is totally different. i'm not saying that a pair of safety glasses will save you from everything, but if you have to wear prescription lenses when you play and if you don't care how you look, get a pair of prescription goggles like those worn in the NBA. again, i'm NOT saying these goggles will save you everytime, but definitely less dangerous to wear than normal reading glasses :)
     
  11. Avenger

    Avenger Regular Member

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    hi Visor, thank you for worrying me :)
    i went to the doctor yesterday (same doctor that did lasik to me)
    and he said let's try to cool down my eye first (because my eye in "shock" and my eye becomes red/ bloodshot)
    after one day using the medicine, my eye is getting better, the red shade is almost gone (I can see a bit red shade, but much better than last time which was bright red)
    but it seems that the accident affecting my eye sight, now my right eye having a trouble to see something far (minus). and kinda hard to focus
     
  12. visor

    visor Regular Member

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    Yikes! You had previous laser cornea surgery!? :eek: That makes it even more important that you wear eye protection.
     
  13. gundamzaku

    gundamzaku Regular Member

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    ironic you had lasik to not wear glasses but for badminton you still need to. wish you a speedy recovery!
     
  14. Avenger

    Avenger Regular Member

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    Hi guys, an update now. my eye is fine now
    so the story is.. (I dunno why I write this.. I have an exam in 10 hours and I am procrastinating right now lol..)

    so after got hit by the shuttle my eye vision went up from minus 0.25 (well even with lasik it can go up, but 0.25 in the past 3 years? not bad) to minus 2.0!
    my doctor said it is because of the shock. he said keep using the medicine and I will be fine. so the first week, my minus dropped to 1.5, the second week dropped to 1.0, and the fourth week dropped to 0.25.

    *in the medical check up, they butchered my eye.. the check up was really painful since my eye was still hurt. so they wanted to know if there is part of my eye ripped or not (because of the shuttle graze my eyeball). so they used this machine to take photos of my eye (so they can see inside of my eyball). they used such a bright blitz that after that I felt dizzy and I couldn't see properly (because I need to open my eye and should not close it when the blitz hit me so the can take the photo properly)

    secondly my doctor use a lens (a scope) and put it on my eye. it is like putting a contact lens to my eye.. but with very solid material (so he could conduct further check up by his own eyes). yes it hurts like hell. he put gel on the other lens though. and he asked me, see to the left, now down, upper left, more upper left. and after that check up, my eye hurt as hell since my eye muscle worked really hard. (and took me 2 weeks to recover from that check up..)

    so yeah now I am fine. but I do get a battle scar from that injury. there is a "flyer" (I don't know the medical term of it) inside of my eye. that means I can see something flying inside of my eye. it looks long and flying around. so my doctor said it is actually normal occurrence for people with high minus or old people.
    that means inner part of your eye is getting ripped. it is kinda annoying since it prevents me to read for long time (when the flyer move around, they obstruct the picture and I feel kinda distracted).

    the first few weeks I cannot read or look for too long because I feel I felt dizzy because of the flyer (and feel wanted to puke since I couldn't shake these feeling of dizziness). but now after 6 months of the accident, I think I can live with it.
     
  15. Avenger

    Avenger Regular Member

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    opps, needs to add. I saw a lot of "flash" or "blitz" in the first few weeks after the accident. my doctor said. along with the flyer. it might be the sign of eye ablation (not sure the name..) meaning my inner eye wall might fall and I will be blind. but thankfully after countless check up, he said it is not the case. but yeah, I need to live with this flyer for the rest of my life (unless I am willingly to pay a lot to do another laser surgery to destroy the flyer)
     
  16. pcll99

    pcll99 Regular Member

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    I agree with what u said. But a lot of professional players do look back. Why?
     
  17. Gollum

    Gollum Regular Member

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    Professionals look back before the shuttle gets near their partner. By the time their partner hits the shuttle, they are already looking forwards.
     
  18. visor

    visor Regular Member

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    Yes, pros do glance back quickly, just to see if their partner will be in good position for an attacking shot or not. So that they will know where to stand and what shot and return to expect.
     
  19. lsmf5

    lsmf5 New Member

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    I recently suffered an eye injury which is still ongoing. I had been hit in the eye before which blurred my vision for around 10 minutes but this one did a number on me.

    My partner played a weak high drop shot, the opponent ran in and had time and with all his might killed it which hit my eye dead on the lens. My racquet was at my chest where I would expect the kill, the opponent not being a skilled player hit it at a bad contact point.

    For the first hour I could see nothing at all except light and dark. It was very scary at this time.
    Over the next few hours in A+E (Accident and Emergency) the vision raised to around 25-30%. I was told that I had internal bleeding in the lens.
    Over the next week the vision increased to around 40% with the blood gradually dissipating, I was told to stay on bed rest for 7-10 days to prevent what is called rebleed.
    The second week the vision raised to around 50% but it was still painful and blurred. I could just about read middle distance but long and short distance were a blur. The pressure buildup left me feeling constantly nauseous for the 2 weeks.
    Week three, vision increased to around 70% and then with a change of drops to 90%. I now have permanent pupil damage as my pupil is in shock and dilated, I will always have glare with any bright lights.
    Week four (this week) The pressure in the eye is not relieving itself as it should with medication. The shuttlecock damaged the angle (the part of the eye fluid leaves) and has damaged roughly 180 degrees of the 360 degree angle of the eye. I also have 95% vision but slight blurring at times. This blurring will likely be permanent as will a slight loss of vision. In the near future I may end up with cataracts. I currently am diagnosed with secondary glaucoma.

    I also have pain regularly and headaches as well as more nausea because of the changing pressure. If the medicine doesn't work may have to get surgery.

    I think back and wonder if only id blinked at that split millisecond. From now on I will be wearing goggles for all sports, one more hit and I may be permanently blind.

    I recommend to anyone reading this, wear eye protection, I was very lucky that by chance I got my vision back, you may not be so lucky. One hit has left me with permanent eye damage and it has been expensive for twice or thrice a week appointments at the hospital as well as a lot of money on medicine.

    Please wear eye protection, don't be one of the unlucky ones.
     
  20. visor

    visor Regular Member

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    ^ Sorry to hear... fortunately your vision has recovered mostly. Hopefully this is not your dominant eye, and that a simple laser surgery can fix the glaucoma.

    Playing forecourt is dangerous in this regard, as there's less time to react after the shuttle crosses the tape. If the opponent is coming in for a net kill, don't bother trying to save the shot by seeing where it'll go... always turn your face, close your eyes, or raise your racket to protect your face.
     

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