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Finger Power

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by SystemicAnomaly, Jul 8, 2001.

  1. SystemicAnomaly

    SystemicAnomaly Regular Member

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    I haven't seen much mention of this technique. I've seen the concept of finger power demonstrated & used quite effectively by Lee Jae Bok (in his video). However, he doesn't actually explain the mechanics of the technique.

    The technique seems quite similar to one that I use for tennis volleys and overhead shots. The grip is held very loosely in the fingers, primarily the thumb and index finger. If the handle of the racket is pushed forward slightly, the racket head is allowed to move back a little with respect to the hand. As contact with the ball or shuttle is imminent, the last three finger of the racket hand squeeze the grip to propel the racket head forward.

    This technique can be used by itself or as the last link of a stroke motion. By itself, such as a tennis volley, there is very little arm movement employed. the power is generated, in large part, by the grip squeeze. Lee Jae Bok uses it in a similar manner for shuttles that are just a little too high above the net. Instead of using a power swing (like a smash), he put the bird to the floor rather quickly with very little arm or racket movement. It SEEMS that his racket head has moved no more than 2 or 3 cm, yet the speed imparted to the shuttle is amazing!

    The same finger technique can also be used as the last part of an arm swing (such as an overhead smash).

    Has anyone out there have any other insights to this technique?
     
  2. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    Would you say it is easier with a smaller size grip rather than a larger size?
     
  3. Mark

    Mark Guest

    That sounds the same as i was taught to grip a racket. That is basically how all forehand shots are played. A test to see if you are doing it correctly is to clear the shuttle with just your index finger and thumb. The other fingers are only really used to stop the racket flying out of your hand and killing your oponent!
     
  4. SystemicAnomaly

    SystemicAnomaly Regular Member

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    yes. i've also heard more than once that larger grips tend to inhibit the amount of power one can generate.
     
  5. SystemicAnomaly

    SystemicAnomaly Regular Member

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    good to hear that your were taught this technique, but why only forehands? it seems to work for backhands as well (for both tennis volleys and badminton).

    were you taught exctly as i described it or do you have another take on it? i still can't figure out how Lee Jae Bok gets such shuttle speed with nearly undectable racket head movement. it seems a lot like Bruce Lee's 1-inch punch (altho' the idea is similar, i'm sure that the body mechanics are different).
     
  6. Mark

    Mark Guest

    Now that i think about it backhands are the same.

    With referance to your video I think that the power comes from the whip in the racket. The racket head is probably moving a lot further than it seems. My coach showed me this. If you stand at the net and do a backhand drive (without a shuttle) but stop the racket about six inches from the net the racket head should actually hit the net because of the whip in the racket.

    It takes a suprising amount of power in the forearm to stop the racket dead when the wrist is thrown very hard. Lee Jae Bok is obviously a master of the racket he holds!
     
  7. Victor

    Victor Regular Member

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    on the web site http://www.sportsid.com, go to badminton then select grip, this finger tecqnique is explained pretty well.

    I think you should think of rolling your racqet with your fingers. For back hand start with palm down after twisting racquet with your fingers( almost like snapping your fingers) your palm is facing up, vice - versa for fore hand. This combined with the pronation or supplination of the fore arm depending on the stroke can generate a lot of power with very little racquet swing. One way to practice this is drives. I think the international doubles players use this tecqnique a lot when returning short serves.
     
  8. SystemicAnomaly

    SystemicAnomaly Regular Member

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    Great advice!

    Thanks for bringing up the finger rolling technique. I've found this also to be very useful tho' i probably don't use it as much as i should. I've had a (tennis) coach mention that this technique is very similar to that used in (Phillipino) stick fighting.

    The web site you mentioned is excellent. I remember watching @!#$ Ng play in tournaments around the SF Bay area some 15 to 20 yrs ago when I was just starting out. At the time he was one of the top players in the U.S. I suspect that he was trained in China or thereabouts.
     
  9. Mag

    Mag Moderator

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    Mr Ng demonstrates squeezing a chunk of modeling clay for strengthening fingers and forearm. I too have used this technique for some months and it REALLY works! It's much better than using a wrist ball or dumbbells (sic?). It doesn't hurt the hand so much, and it gives better results.
     
  10. SystemicAnomaly

    SystemicAnomaly Regular Member

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    @!#$

    it seems that this message board is censored. it wouldn't print Mr Ng's first name...D-i-c-k . c'mon guys, is this really a problem on this board?
     

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