Thanks for visiting us!

Badminton Central is a free community for fans of badminton! If you find anything useful here please consider registering to see more content and get involved with our great community users, it takes less than 15 seconds! Everybody is welcome here.

Click here for a FREE account!

Fixing Years of Bad Technique

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by lightningblaze, Jul 10, 2012.

  1. lightningblaze

    lightningblaze Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2012
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Canada
    Hey,

    So for many years I've developed bad technique (its not too bad but still bad) and by playing lots I've made those strokes natural or they are a part of my muscle memory. I now finally want to fix these bad strokes and I now know how to perform the correct those strokes. My question is what is the most effective way to build the proper strokes as my muscle memory and erase the old technique. Would it be through high repetition of stroke shadowing or should I actually play? And how much time can I expect to fix my strokes!

    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. paulierand

    paulierand Regular Member

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2009
    Messages:
    115
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    san francisco
    Find a good coach (who offers 1 on 1 time and works on your form) and invest in lessons. If you try to fix it all in a game, you will get frustrated because you don't have the time to think of what you did wrong

    Videotape yourself performing the stroke so you can understand what you need to change.

    At your club, take notice of the strong players and try to dissect what they do and how they do it.
     
  3. coachgary

    coachgary Regular Member

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2006
    Messages:
    472
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    uk
    Hi, this is a good question.

    You do need an experienced coach to help correct any bad form/technique that you have picked up over the years. The good thing is that your timing and hand/eye co-ordination will be good.


    One to One coaching is great but not a neccessity. In fact I would suggest that you look for group coaching say upto 4 players from the club. The benefit here is that the coach can watch you more closely whilst you're rallying with a partner. Any demonstrations and advice will be imparted on all four of you at the same time and so you will be able to practice these new techniques and skills together. Experienced players have a keen eye once they're shown the right technique, even if it may take a few weeks or months to put into practice what they've seen. They'll be your best critics, trust me.
    Another benefit is that you'll be able to learn from the mistakes made by others too.

    The coach will set up drills and routines which could be too intensive for all 4 players to perform the same time, thus two could be working a set at a time whilst the other two rest. This gives the coach an opportunity to watch the working players whilst you listen to his instructions and seeing the effect on the workers.

    Expect your performance at club nights/matches to dip whilst you're having specific technique coaching. This is normal. It will take time for the good habit to become natural. Weeks and months. Some things you'll pick up straight away, slight grip adjustments for example. However, fixing a pan handle overhead could take months!

    It's almost impossible to practice effectively at club nights as there is too much pressure on court time for matches no matter how friendly the intentions.

    Watch, listen and repeat. Watch, listen and repeat. Repeat, repeat, repeat.
     
  4. lightningblaze

    lightningblaze Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2012
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Canada
    yeah im going to try that! thanks!
     
  5. visor

    visor Regular Member

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2009
    Messages:
    13,499
    Likes Received:
    258
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    already good points above

    also want to add:
    - to correct your weaknesses, do lots of specific drills with an experienced player/partner, ask him/her to correct you and give you pointers
    - make sure you play/practice/drill with only feather birds as only these will give you the proper feel and feedback for crisp contact with your strings/racket
    - don't forget that other than strokes, footwork is equally or even more important as it'll determine the quality of shots that you can play from any given position depending on how soon you can get there
     
    #5 visor, Jul 12, 2012
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2012
  6. captaincook

    captaincook Regular Member

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2012
    Messages:
    272
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    captain
    Location:
    New York
    not just us, the pros are doing it all the time.
     
  7. SantaSCSI

    SantaSCSI Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2009
    Messages:
    205
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    IT Guy
    Location:
    Belgium
    Expect it to be hard. Muscle memory and routines are difficult to get rid of, taken that you are not a youngster. As previously said, a personal coach and LOTS of specific (and boring) stroke training.
     
  8. lightningblaze

    lightningblaze Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2012
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Canada
  9. phili

    phili Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2012
    Messages:
    817
    Likes Received:
    17
    Location:
    Germany
    Even if you get 1on1 coaching repetition still is the way to go. You will be thrilled.
     
  10. Staiger1

    Staiger1 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2012
    Messages:
    259
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Fashion designer
    Location:
    Court 2
    If you stick with bad technique, you will only reach a stage (good club level player) but cant improve any further , with good technique , is infinity and beyond with what you can achieve.


    Finding an experience coach will be a good start to your quest ! If not than watch some tutorial videos on youtube (there are tonnes )+ watch and study clips of good players play, here is a nice video . + record yourself play and make the comparison , however this is not a replacement in getting a good coach


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TQmsJnHGLxM&feature=related
     
  11. Sander1337

    Sander1337 New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2012
    Messages:
    30
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Netherlands
    I have had the same problems several years ago..

    I was in a club, where training was in large groups (30) with only (1) or (2) trainers...

    You develop bad habits, and if you were never told your grip was wrong as a beginner, or your footwork was all wrong, you will develop that into the bad habit and almost never get away from it.

    I changed it through leaving the club, stop competitive play for over a year and focus just on training (and at least 3 times a week). My grip was changed, my footwork was changed and my complete attitude was changed.

    Only way to do this is stop competitive play, no more tournaments, no more matches... Only training. As soon as you start playing matches without you being used to the new (correct) grip you will revert back to your old (bad) grip again and you will have to start all over again...
    After you have stopped competitive play you invest time with a personal trainer or triaining in small groups...

    It's kind of hard but this is the only way...
     
  12. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2002
    Messages:
    16,234
    Likes Received:
    31
    Occupation:
    wannabe badminton phototaker
    Location:
    Outside the box
    That's a great statement. Frequency (i.e. 2-3 times a week minimum) is very important to break the old habits/poor shot technique, learn the new technique and make it part of your muscle memory.
     

Share This Page