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for those who are starting badminton...

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by kwun, Jan 10, 2005.

  1. Shifty

    Shifty Regular Member

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    doesn't matter what the pros use, they're pros. getting a Yonex Ti-10 like Fu Haifeng has doesn't grant you an instant 332km/h smash. any full carbon graphite racquet will do, make sure it's a one piece racquet though. some have two pieces joined at the racquet head neck. those are bad.

    there are some similarities between tennis and badminton. for example, the overhead serve is kind of similar to an over the head stroke. of course, the small details will be different. search the Techniques/training section. also look for gollum's grip guide
     
  2. newkid

    newkid New Member

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    shifty thks

    Thks.

    Great advice. Bought a Yonex carbo racket. Cheap but found out later it was Made in Taiwan. No sweat - will wait until skills improve. Aslo advice about similarity with tennis was welcomed.:D

    Am presently taking a focrced rest due to doctor's stop. Seems I either strained or minor tear of some ligaments / muscles on my left shoulder.:mad: Probably happened when I went up for a smash on my right playing side. Had a similar experience playing tennis. Too much pull on the supporting side. But the pain is worse cause of age.:crying:Thks again. Newkid.
     
  3. andrewlimch

    andrewlimch New Member

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    Why are T jointed rackets bad? I'm using one at the moment as it's pretty heavy compared to my wife's Ti-8 or my friend's Nanotech.

    the reason why i stuck to that old racket is because it's heavy and old. I thought i could practise my strength and technique better with a heavy one... I even use it to play doubles.

    Once I get better, I will transition to a proper racket and hope that my movement will get exponentially faster.

    Would appreciate your reply, Shifty.
     
  4. IOUZIP

    IOUZIP Regular Member

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    Usually, if you REALLY want to train strength and speed, use a squash racquet :p


    also, if you get used to using the old heavy racquet, you may find it quite difficult to transition to a new racquet. If you're a beginner, its best to stick with one racquet that you're going to use for a long time before switching. That way, you can actually concentrate on improving your technique (especially the fundamentals) rather than trying to adjust to a new racquet.
     
  5. Shifty

    Shifty Regular Member

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    sorry for such a late reply :eek: but i forgot all about this thread. the reason is that the t-joint usually isn't stiff, so you can bend the joint at the racquet head. what you'll end up getting is the head not lining up with the shaft, kinda stuck out at an angle,like a bendy straw. no matter how you try, you can't get it to line up again. those that are one piece won't bend like this.
     
  6. kjw96

    kjw96 Regular Member

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    i 100 %ly agree with you; to hit using a mp 100 while you still c'ant smash, you are just wasting the racquet's ability.
    YOu should also master the basics first before attempting or putting all your effort into training in those fancy shots.
     
  7. jhanple

    jhanple New Member

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    Does anyone have a training programs for badminton? books or pdf files? I want to learn proper badminton? plz help me out,.,.email it to jkem_fontanilla@yahoo.com
     
  8. Skanbuzz

    Skanbuzz Regular Member

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    Hi,

    Great advises.

    Does this apply to junior too?
    My children (9 to 13yrs) started coming to an adult badminton at the local leisure centre once a week.
    My wife & myself joined this group afew weeks ago so we can get some exercise. We had not play for over 15yrs and fitness is poor but we are not totally beginner.

    How best to start with the juniors? Any advise or guidance? Any dvd that train juniors?
    How best to keep them interested and yet not learn bad habit?
    If they play tennis at school with coaching, will the techniques contradict with badminton?
     
  9. ways2rock

    ways2rock Regular Member

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    Great one ^^
    But this forum helps me a lot
    Vielen Dank!
     
  10. jebluexie

    jebluexie Regular Member

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    Hay..
    i'm a badminton lover! i love to play Badminton so much..
    i ever dreamed of becoming a badminton athlete but the problem is i'm already 16 n it sound too late to start playing in my age now.
    is it possible that if i start work hard from now on, i will become an athlete someday??
     
  11. phandrew

    phandrew Regular Member

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    Just because you are 16 doesn't mean you are too late. You can join the international player at the age of 24 if you were good enough.
     
  12. Sevex

    Sevex Regular Member

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    16 isn't to late to start playing, I started at 18 at university and haven't looked back since, although I'm not amazing compared to the 1st team I'm getting closer to the 2nd team now. That's only after 1year and 9 months so if you enjoy it and train lots any thing is possible (with coaching at times).
     
  13. jebluexie

    jebluexie Regular Member

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    oww.. that sounds great!! so what shall i do now?? take a coach with somebody. hmmphh... but the problem is, i'm now in indonesia n i ever heard that if u want to become a badminton athlete here in INA u 've to start from 9 yrs old with special training n no school.. when i heard of that i'm hopeless.. hikshiks..
    my friend with younger age, he joined a badminton team n he said that all his friends are very young. should i joined the team also??
     
  14. Sevex

    Sevex Regular Member

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    I'm no expert but in my university they had group coaching sessions which I attended to learn the basics. I also joined the uni club. Personal coaching is too expensive for me :) Joining your club/team is definitely a good thing to do, just don't be disappointed if you lose, stick with it!
     
  15. trainedtotrain

    trainedtotrain Regular Member

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    The ultimate truth

    Hi Guys,

    This is interseting, everyone have his idea on the game. This will lead to many views and ways of approach.

    The truth is :

    About the grip, there are many ways of gripping the racket. 1) the thumb grip, 2) the palm grip, 3) the side grip, 4) the underarm finger grip, 5) the forehand open grip.

    NOTE : shortenning of the racket and lengthening of the racket is also techniques refering to the grip. Gripping the racquet too hard will kill the power produce as your suprinators/pronators freezes your wrist freezes and become less flexible.

    That will reduce your whipping speed as velocity is been reduced.

    About the footwork, First we must all understand that people loves badminton because they enjoy the sensation of hitting the shuttle, feeling the tension and the sound produced by it.

    They do not enjoy doing repeated runs in the court. This type of footwork drill is already history. We are now in the 21st century and we are equipped with sport science and we are talking about mental skills.

    What you all see in the website is never a training secret, because you train according on what you see and you can never find satisfaction and improvement. Sadly to say you could hardly apply during the competitive games. You will even lose more participants and eventually you will lose your business.

    Teaching correct techniques and preparing their physical competency is important. What is more important is we must arrest the first bad habbit or incorrect movement the athlete makes or create during the training sessions under our coaching eyes.

    If we are able to do this diligently we can then be able to produce good competitive flawless players at the shortest time.

    The world top players are not flawless, it is just that there is no one better than them. This is where you coaches come in.

    Make use of what you have been taught, coaching is an art. There are many colors you can chose, you can draw an orange and color it blue, are you game enough to do so?

    Train smart and not train too hard. Hope all of you will have more athletes coming to you and you have more business.

    You must be proud of yourself and carry yourself where ever you go as a sports coach. If you do not have confidence in yourself and hide away from the public how are you able to instill confidence to your athletes.

    This is the ultimate challenge and the ultimate truth.
     
  16. kichiro obuchi

    kichiro obuchi New Member

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    FOCUS ON:

    - focus on the correct grip - read the grip guide in BC -got it i think.......
    - focus on the correct stroke - ask a coach to show you. -check :]
    - focus on footwork- check kindaa.....
    - focus on fitness - jog/swim/bike - or do footwork drills - working on it because im like a fat kid who plays singles need to lose some weight so i can move faster and more endurance, and dont get under estimated :]

    DO NOT FOCUS ON:

    - trick shots - stop learning those strange shots. -uhhhh the coach taught me... he said it might be helpful so i just use it in games.... idk u can't do them -.-"
    - fancy style - i have so many times seen beginners with really fancy looking hitting style but then they miss the shuttle. keep it simple. - well uhhh no one taught me the correct form of hitting so i just watch the varsity players and copy with no one to advise and correct me so i dont really know :[
    - strength training - leave this after you have learned your basic strokes - uhhh i never thought of that :]
    - expensive racket - you will most likely be wasting money - **** i got like the second best racket in the market now [AT 900 tech] and imma freakin JV :[ crack! but im getting better :] ....i hope.....
     
  17. secretly

    secretly New Member

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    i will definately give the grip guide a read through asap
     
  18. Gollum

    Gollum Regular Member

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    Not that I want to take anything away from BC, but I wrote that grips guide way back in 2004. I published a new grips guide in January 2008, which is more accurate and much more detailed.
     
  19. onipirate

    onipirate New Member

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    I guess being a beginner in badminton really goes back to basics
     
  20. trainedtotrain

    trainedtotrain Regular Member

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    Hi Onipirate, you are right. When you start from basic and started on the right track you can play the game within 6 months time. That is 3 times a week @ 2 hours each session.

    Good luck

    Cheers
     

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