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Frame Slipping

Discussion in 'Badminton Rackets / Equipment' started by NoIso4Me, Aug 1, 2004.

  1. NoIso4Me

    NoIso4Me Regular Member

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    Sorry if this question has been asked before but I havn't been successful searching the forums.
    I have a 2 point mount machine (EAG-300). When tensioning over 20 pounts the head will slip and shift in the direction being pulled. Its an unacceptable amount of movement. I'm clamping down pretty hard as it is, and am afraid to put more pressure on the frame. Any tips on how to prevent SHIFTING of the head???:confused: Also... Am I right in assuming that the frame is supposed to move slightly under the mounts at 12 and 6 oclock on a 2 point machine to allow the frame to compress and then decompress vertically. Then by adding 10% more tension to the crosses it returns to a more NORMAL shape? How does this happen if the frame is mounted securely anyways? I'm confused:confused: The racket has to be secure enough to not shift, but not too secure that it can compress and stretch vertically?????? How is this achieved at the same time, or am I completely wrong by assuming any of this? :( Experienced stringers..... Please HELP.

    Also... Should I be locking the turntable before tensioning.... As of right now I tension without locking the turntable, allowing it to spin to the possition accordingly. I only lock the turntable when tying knots
     
  2. BobbyGeneric

    BobbyGeneric Regular Member

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    I'm not so sure why that happens on your machine, as i've never personally seen that, but the frame should definite NEVER move at the support points. As the rest of the racquet is not near a support (other than the top/bottom), as you string the mains it will add stress to the parts of the racquet between two points that are both "unsupported." So after just the mains are strung there will sometimes be a noticeable bending up/down (depending on the machine, tension).

    As for locking the turntable, i never really do that except sometimes at the end when i am straightening out the cross strings. Good luck with your stringing! And make sure you use some "practice" stringings before moving on to the more expensive racquets.
     
  3. cappy75

    cappy75 Regular Member

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    Have you installed pieces of buffer (like rubber or leather) on the contact points? I think many stringing machines don't have those in their support mount to keep the racquet from slipping and sliding. Many veteran stringers I met have those in their machines.
     
    #3 cappy75, Aug 1, 2004
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2004
  4. taneepak

    taneepak Regular Member

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    A 2-point machine is usually a hold-down or clamp-down machine and should not move at all if properly clamped. If your machine's head and throat bottom supports have a groove-like channel for your frame to fit in, then no movement is possible. However, if the supports have only a raised inner curved bar to hold the inside of the frame at the head and throat, which prevents the frame from moving inwards, you should then clamp your supports very firmly, to prevent the frame from moving outwards with the pull. Clamp down firmly until there is resistance and it will not screw down any more. Start pulling from the center in a sysmetrical pattern, left then right, to load the frame properly. If necessary, try to pull the first two middle main strings with one pull at the bottom, thereafter you can pull the strings one at a time. Frequently tighten the clamps if there is any sign of slack. :D
     
  5. taneepak

    taneepak Regular Member

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    Under no circumstances should you stretch the racquet frame when adjusting the head and/or throat mounting supports.
     
  6. NoIso4Me

    NoIso4Me Regular Member

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    Thx. I will try some leather pads. Taneepak, the supports ARE just a raised inner curved, plastic wall that rests against the inside frame. Should I be mounted firmly against this inside wall and them clamp down as firmly as possible or should I leave a small gap between the wall at the head and throat to allow for some compression?:)
     
  7. taneepak

    taneepak Regular Member

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    You should not leave any gap between the wall at the head and throat. Neither should you stretch the inner part of the head or throat when mounting the supports. Yes, you can clamp down as firmly as possible.
     

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