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getting use to higher tension

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by Capnx, Jul 9, 2008.

  1. Capnx

    Capnx Regular Member

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    I normally play with 22 and 23lbs (with bg65 or 65Ti).
    I recently just restringed at 24lbs, and I find the racquet "heavier" to hit. Somehow, I get no power at all when smashing, and my clears are more difficult to gauge (either really short at mid court, or if i swing more it goes really out).
    But good news is my drops and nets improved much more.

    So is this just a learning curve, that I need time to get used to the new tension? I noticed that after about 2 or 3 hrs or play, my elbow started to hurt, and I find it harder to grab the racquet. I had to stop play and keep twisting my arm to stretch my elbow.
     
  2. Gollum

    Gollum Regular Member

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    You're not ready for that tension yet.

    These feelings -- "heavier" to hit, loss of power, pain in the arm -- are the classic indications that tension is too high.

    If you continue playing at that tension, you risk injury. I recommend you go back to your previous string tension.
     
  3. phandrew

    phandrew Regular Member

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    Are you using the same string? If you lack power then drop your tension.
     
  4. LazyBuddy

    LazyBuddy Regular Member

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    Please answer the following questions 1st:

    1. Do you use the same stringer?

    2. Do you use the same string?

    3. When you refer 22/23 lb, do you use it when it's freshly strung, or it's been over years


    Reason being is, I found it hard to believe that with a increament of 1lb, the impact could be that significant. If any of the above your answer is no or (old for #3), then, I can say the actual different in tension might be much larger than you expected.

    Overall, don't push too hard as it's risky. You can choose either let it sit for a week or two, therefore, the tension will be drop to your normal range. Or, simply re-string it with the string/tension you are comfortable with. ;)
     
  5. alexkho

    alexkho Regular Member

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    ohh gosh i just ask the stringer to string my at 24lb i like using 22lb but the tension drop to fast so i was thinking to ask to increase to 24lb ? do you guys thinkg is a bad mistake ?
     
  6. phandrew

    phandrew Regular Member

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    Did you find 22lbs a bit tight for you? If so then try 20lbs
     
  7. alexkho

    alexkho Regular Member

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    try 20 ? i like like 22 ... but i just ask him to string it at 24 .. i just worry that it's going to be to tight .. should i go to 23lb ? thats my quesiton :p
     
  8. Capnx

    Capnx Regular Member

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    yes, the same string Bg65Ti.
    I started playing with the 24lb the day after it was strung.

    now looking back, when going from 22lb to 23lb, i also went through a period of "pain" in my elbo and difficulty controlling my power on my shots. I just hope i can adapt to the new tesion without any injuries.

    So i guess my new question is how can you tell if you're ready to move to higher tension? and what can you do to prepare/easy the transition? lift weights? shadow with squash racquet?
     
  9. LazyBuddy

    LazyBuddy Regular Member

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    I wonder how long is the life span of your string. If the string lasts you very long, your actual tension must be much less than it begin with. Therefore, instead of improve from 22 to 23, you might actually increase from 19 or 20 to 23. Same theory applies for your 23 --> 24 movement.

    My suggestion is not to put into full force on the racket right away. Take it easy, and give it time to let it "break in", which usually result in at least 5%-10% tension loss in a week or 2. Then, the gap between tension difference should be more acceptable.
     
  10. jhirata

    jhirata Regular Member

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    I experienced this same 'pain' period when I jumped from ~18lbs ( dropped from 22lbs ) to 24lbs on my MP40 with MPXL. I just kept on using it anyway, and that pain actually helped me make use of my wrist more and use less 'arm-power'. So in the long run, it actually corrected by stroke technique. I recently jumped up by another 2lbs to 26lbs, and I reckon my technique can improved once again, as I am more 'explosive' with my shots.
     
  11. phandrew

    phandrew Regular Member

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    When you increase the tension it takes a while before you are able to get use to it.
     
  12. Pete LSD

    Pete LSD Regular Member

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    That sounds dink good. Any plan for 30 X 33 later on :D?

     
  13. jhirata

    jhirata Regular Member

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    I am currently on 26x28.6, so I'll be on 28x30.8 next time :D.. then what, maybe 30x33 after that ? If it's too high, then I'll probably stick to the tension that I'd feel comfortable with, maybe 26 or 28. It's all about experimenting..

    So Capnx, it's never wrong to try out new tensions.. if it's too high for you, you would know it, and you'd be able to find the right tension for yourself then by dropping the tension next time.
     
  14. Capnx

    Capnx Regular Member

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    thanks for all the help :)
    yea, the 24lb is the freshly new tension. maybe after a couple weeks of playing it drop down a little
     
  15. taneepak

    taneepak Regular Member

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    The key to successfully switch from low to high tension is an increase in the hand/forearm speed before shuttle impact. In other words the wrist/hand/forearm speed going for that shuttle impact must be discernably faster than other parts of the swing. A strong snappy wrist is necessary. It will be an improvement if you can do net pushes, both forehand and backhand, with crispness and speed with high tension besides smashes and clears. Fast pushes hit with crispness, only possible with high tension, are killer shots.
     
  16. horace_ej

    horace_ej Regular Member

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    I do not see the question from a hardware angle. 24lb should be fine for any normal adults, but with a pre-condition of the player's basic skill.
    It sounds to me that Capnx is on a starting stage without a reasonable enough hitting behaviour. So my suggestion is that

    1. consult with a senior player to improve the hitting behaviour
    2. if not, try to adjust the hitting point a bit more forward
    3. start to accelerate the swing with your wrist 40cm away from the hitting point
     
  17. jhirata

    jhirata Regular Member

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    Since this is the techniques sub-forum, Capnx, you could post a video of yourself playing so that we can comment on your playing style and most imporatantly your stroke technique. If there's a flaw with your technique, then those side-effects of higher-tensions will show up.
     
  18. Gollum

    Gollum Regular Member

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    I strongly advise players not to tolerate pain in the pursuit of high string tension. You are putting yourself at risk of injury.

    This is not necessary. High string tensions are not an efficient way to improve technique (coaching and practice are efficient ways to improve technique).

    Players often attribute skill changes to equipment, when actually the changes come mainly from them. It's comforting, somehow, to externalise your variations in skill: blame/praise the strings, the racket, anything but yourself.

    It's not worth risking injury just for the sake of playing with higher tensions. Take your time; wait a little longer; keep your shoulder safe.
     
  19. jhirata

    jhirata Regular Member

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    I see your point, luckily in my case, I did not get any long-term injuries.
    After around 10minutes of play with higher-tensions, I had a painful shoulder. I then switched back to another racquet with a flexible shaft and with low-string tension to play with, the rest of the time.

    After each session, I used the higher-tensionned racquet for a little bit longer period, ie: 20mins instead of 10. The string tension must have dropped, but it took more time for the pain to strike. This pattern repeated until I experienced no pain at all, but there is still a risk of injuring yourself if you play too much with it.
    Anyway, I'd suggest everyone to listen to Gollum rather than me.. since he obviously has more experience.

    I have a question. What if our technique is good, lets say, as good as an advanced-player, but we use low string-tension ? Will we still get this pain in our arms and shoulders if we increase the tension ? Or will we easily get used to the tension because our stroke techniques are correct ?
     
  20. cappy75

    cappy75 Regular Member

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    It's more of a timing issue than strength as I have seen some skinny kids from Asia playing with high tension. They could really clear the shuttle with ease. Needless to say, it's due more to their training than their strength. It's all good to experiment with different tension, but it's not worth the trouble when you're getting chronic pain in your shoulder and wrist.

    I would do what Jhirata does, have a playing racquet with regular tension and a 'workout' racquet with slightly higher tension. It'll take quite awhile to gradually time your stroke. Just hit some clears with your workout racquet for warm up before you play. Take the time to 'graduate' to your workout racquet.
     

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