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Help with serve (high)

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by looseleftie, Aug 8, 2007.

  1. looseleftie

    looseleftie New Member

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    Hello, I have played comp for two weeks now, and i have been given some good advice on serving low, I guess I am looking at expanding my rep of different kinds of serves, in particular the high serve. How can I generate the racquet speed enabling me to serve high and deep?? I understand that you drop the shuttle pretty much at the same time as you swing your racquet, this is fine for low serves, yet for high serves, I just don't quite seem to get the high serve that I am after...Generally too short, easy put away for a half decent player, or a return that puts a lot of pressure on me.

    If anyone can help, this would be greatly appreciated..At present I am only playing doubles...
    Thanks in advance
    Looseleftie
     
  2. wocdam

    wocdam Regular Member

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    this works for me. before the serve, usually my racket arm will be raised to shoulder level slightly behind me. when i drop the shuttle, my arm will follow at the same time. then on contact the arm will follow thru' with wrist action finally taking the shuttle thru'. sounds vague, but hope this may help you.
     
  3. Gollum

    Gollum Regular Member

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    For doubles, the high serve is almost useless. Your opponent will have plenty of time to get well behind the shuttle, ready to play a powerful smash; and he will recover quickly for the next shot, because he is under no movement pressure.

    The high serve occasionally works in doubles against an unprepared receiver, who may have trouble timing the smash when the shuttle falls down vertically. But good receivers will have no trouble, especially if they are also singles players.

    Against strong players, doubles high serving is suicidal. The aim of the doubles serve is to gain the first attack; with a high serve, you surrender the attack every time.

    For doubles, use the flick serve instead. This should be just high enough so that the receiver cannot intercept it early: your aim is to force him to play a return from somewhat behind his body, so the serve needs to be much shallower (flatter) than a high serve.

    Skilful players can still play a smash when the shuttle is behind them; but it will be much less threatening than a full power smash.
     
    #3 Gollum, Aug 8, 2007
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2007
    Green72(CAN) likes this.
  4. DivingBirdie

    DivingBirdie Regular Member

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    Like gollum mentioned, i haven't really seen anyone do a forehand high serve in doubles.(unless he's trying to show his oppoenents some condescension:)) i think what you mean would be a forehand flick done by a person who uses the forehand short serve usually. personall i use the forehand flick serve only in singles, because i find the backhand service much better for me in doubles. so it's all-backhand serving for me in doubles.
    found this thread from a search regarding forehand high serve http://www.badmintoncentral.com/forums/showthread.php?t=38368
     
  5. looseleftie

    looseleftie New Member

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    Thanks everyone for your replies firstly.. Appreciated

    I play only doubles at moment, and was advised by some fellow players to serve only backhand serves. After reading your advice, it seems that I am wasting my time (in doubles) to practise or work at high serves.. Obviously singles is another matter enirely..

    Gollum, I guess that I should practise the flick serve . I have been practising a little on my low serve and thats coming on, which is encouraging especially see it this week during my games..

    Apologize for my ignorance, but what is the actual rule in relation to how high you can hold the shuttle, and how much of a swing and follow through can you have when serving??? :confused: I asked about it, and the explanation seemed a little unclear, and possibly not that accurate!!!

    Thanks heaps everyone for your time on my post.
    See ya Looseleftie:)
     
  6. Monster

    Monster Regular Member

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    I see a lot of high serve in my club especially when opponents are net rushers. I recently encountered a doubles pair who, when I served low, he deceptively flicked the shuttle opposite the direction the position of his arm seemed to suggest. It was deceptive. I served, he extended his arm with the racket face facing upwards (racket face not 100% parallel to the floor and the sky but at a small angle) and when the shuttle reached him, he had two choices of deceptions;

    1. Suddenly flicked hard when it appeared like he was going to drop return the shuttle. His arm just looked so relax!

    2. Suddenly slapped with a forehand drive sideway but not hitting the shuttle so that the racket is now to the right of the shuttle (and shuttle was still dropping with gravity of course) and then immediately backslapped (backhand; just like a mirror image of his first forehand slap) and contacted the shuttle so that it got to the other side of my court where my partner is standing (but behind). I don't know if you can picture what I explained, but this second deception caught me many times because I rushed to the right side of my court (where he first slapped the shuttle to his left side; he is right handed) but the shuttle ended up at the left side of my court. His first forehand slap to his right side of his court (he is right handed) is when the shuttle is just slightly above his racket but he was quick enough to backslap such that the shuttle was not too close to the ground. His wristwork was impressive!

    Have you guys encountered such deceptive players when you first serve to him/her? How do you train for such wristworks?
     
    #6 Monster, Aug 9, 2007
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2007
  7. stumblingfeet

    stumblingfeet Regular Member

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    Haha, there's one move I sometimes do when playing against friends:

    Serve as high as possible, so that my opponent looks up and not at the court. Sometimes (surprisingly frequently, it seems), the player gets lazy and tries to do something fancy like a cross-court drop.

    So... run up to the net, wait for that drop, and demolish his spirit with the big kill at the net!
     
  8. DivingBirdie

    DivingBirdie Regular Member

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    the point of contact of the shuttle with your racket should be below your waist level.
    i don't think there's any limit on follow-throughs
     
  9. XtC-604

    XtC-604 Regular Member

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    heheh flick serving is soooo damn useful, you can USUALLY get 1-2 points just from catching your opponent when he tries to stand further up just because you have served low for the last several serves. BTW i think there is no real way for any of us online posters to help you...unless we post frame by frame pictures and everything. I think the best way is to try to work it out yourself by serving on an empty court and if you still can't get it, then ask another player at your club to help you.
     

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