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Hot do you defend a body shot

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by olo_brown, Sep 28, 2005.

  1. olo_brown

    olo_brown New Member

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    I would like the opinion of expert viewers and readers of this forum if they can advised me or what is the best technique to defend a body shot. It is often that I am finding some difficulty defending a body shot and most opponents know that it is one of the weakest link and a great strategy to return a body shot. Defensive wise are there any special techniques. Would appreciate any advise that will help improve my game based on defending body shots.:confused:
     
  2. Gollum

    Gollum Regular Member

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    Lower posture; racket in front of the body, to take shuttle early; position yourself slightly further back in the court. Split step, move your feet to adjust your position slightly when the shuttle comes.

    Great video on www.ibbs.tv about defending the smash.
     
  3. kmodak

    kmodak Regular Member

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    I commit to my back hand whicle recieveieng the smash. This works exceptionally well when the shuttle comes at about knee height or lower. This stance does not help if the shuttle come above the stomach level.

    The best technique is to flex knees and position yourself in a couching position with the racquest just above your head level. It is tough to execute but very effective once you get the hang of it. It is tiring hard work rather than stand tall and return.
     
  4. DinkAlot

    DinkAlot dcbadminton
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  5. Gollum

    Gollum Regular Member

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    Most players (including pros) prefer backhand defense. But you have to be ready for forehands too -- if the smasher hits to your forehand, a backhand reply will be weak.
     
  6. kmodak

    kmodak Regular Member

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    You are absolutely right. Bust how does one do that. Need to be ready with either back or fore hand reply?
     
  7. coops241180

    coops241180 Regular Member

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    hmmm, to be ready for both your racquet needs to be out in front, i prefer to hold in a forehand grip since changing to backhand / universal grip is quite a quick change as opposed to the otherway.

    stand with your legs just a little more than shoulder width apart, square on to the smasher and bend your knees, ideally i would say get down far enough so that your eye level is about the height of the net, maybe a bit lower..

    now.. think about where your going to return to.. straight is easier, if you want to get back on the attack a flat driving block back is best, altho it can be predictable. so pick your spot and put the shuttle there..

    practice is really the key for this.. reading body language, discovering smasher preferences all help with reactions. if you get really good at reading the shuttle trajectory you can even attack it back.. some people i have played struggle getting the angle so i step in an extra step, squat down quite a lot and pay it like a drive.. works a treat :)

    Coops
     
  8. DinkAlot

    DinkAlot dcbadminton
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    Not if you work on your backhand return to the forehand. My backhand return is almost as powerful as my forehand return. And my backhand return is more accurate and consistent.
     
  9. jerby

    jerby Regular Member

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    get low,
    place racket far away from body ( not full stretching)
    and 80% of teh body shots a backhand is sufficient.
     
  10. Gollum

    Gollum Regular Member

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    It might be more apposite to say "my forehand return is weaker than my backhand, and therefore I try to play backhands on the forehand side".

    Playing a backhand on the forehand side will limit the quality of your returns. It does work, and can get you out of difficult situations (even the pros use it sometimes), but it is not the ideal technique to use.

    Rather than practise this dodgy method, practise both your forehand and backhand returns. There is no need to change grip: a neutral "forehand" grip will work for both. Don't bias your body angle towards the backhand: face sqaure-on to the smasher.

    Work on power from your fingers by practising with a racket head cover on your racket. If you can hit the shuttle to the back of the court, then you're doing very well. Then take the head cover off, and see how effortless and accurate your returns have become :)

    Warning: this practise is not for children, or players with injuries. If overdone, you can strain muscles in the arm and wrist.
     
    #10 Gollum, Sep 29, 2005
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2005
  11. DinkAlot

    DinkAlot dcbadminton
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    I guess I didn't make myself clear. If there's a shot going to my forehand, I'll definitely use my forehand return unless I cannot and have to use my backhand. I did not mean I use a my backhand return exclusively. It's just better for overall defense, meaning I can use a backhand return on both my forehand and backhand side but cannot use my forehand return on my backhand side. Hope that made sense.
     
  12. Michael-Lam

    Michael-Lam Regular Member

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    get lower so if they hit with lots of angle you can hit it underhand and if its not that steep you can just drive it back
     
  13. event

    event Regular Member

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    If you're trying to prevent taking it in the body, wouldn't this refer more to a case where you're already further forward in the court?

    I have a bad habit of preparing to return smashes low even when near the front and need to get into the habit of holding my racquet up while getting low to turn it into a drive. I have some opponents, though, who know I am weak in protecting my body so they smash flat at my chest even when I'm further back. One guy's smash is very strong and I believe he knows that he's sending it out but that I won't react fast enough to accept the gift.

    When I am more to the back and get a smash at my body that isn't going out, the best I can manage usually is a sort of windmill motion from a low backhand preparation position that will sometimes send a deceptive wobbler just over the net on the righthand side.
     
  14. cappy75

    cappy75 Regular Member

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    In addition to what Gollum said, you gotta be relaxed and keep your sight on the source of the smash. My returns are the worst when I blink while my opponent smash. Any reflex tension will limit your power and control in every shot. Appropriate tension for different shots ingrained in your practice will eventually give you the optimum timing for those shots, making relaxed delivery possible and second nature. Of course, mental strength is also a large part of this. But confidence in your strokes will build upon itself and allows you to focus more on your opponents.

    With fingers choking at the cone, your racquet should be pointing towards the source, not too high and not too low, important thing is to keep it as far from you as comfortably possible without straightening out your arm fully. Keep the frame head higher than the cone (exactly the same as service law except the other way around:p). That way, you could defend either side with ease.

    My coach told me to make almost every shot return (eg. drives or blocks) with the racquet frame head up. You'll have the least control when you hit underhand, that's why the safest underhanded shot is a baseline lob.

    A low profile will limit your exposure to a hit, it's very taxing position to hold for long but you'll get used to it once you keep at it:). Keeping on your toes will allow you mobility in case of returns outside your immediate defense zone. Don't ever rest fully on your feet when you defend as you will stay rooted to the ground.
     
    #14 cappy75, Sep 30, 2005
    Last edited: Sep 30, 2005
  15. coops241180

    coops241180 Regular Member

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    hmmm, interestingly i can do both.. forehand on the backhand and backhand on the forehand.. doing it on the wrong side limits reach - especially on the forehand adn usualy results in taking the shuttle more to the side or into the body. get you racquet out in front of you more and you'll start taking the forehand ones better.. you might even be able to drive a few back..

    Coops
     
  16. dpc1l

    dpc1l Regular Member

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    Hey, Cappy, I agree with everything you mentioned there. I'm working on standing on my toes and getting my stance right, but it's definitely working.
    I've been told that it's a singles defence, but it works for me in doubles, so I'm carrying on working on it.
    It's really effective with fairly hard but flat smashes!
     
  17. extremenanopowe

    extremenanopowe Regular Member

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    defence

    hold the racket high up near to the cone. Put your hand to the front about 160 degrees elbow bent. Put some space between the racket and your body. Flick the shuttle back to the opponent when it near. Anticipate it and keep on practising.:D
    rgds
     
  18. Crosskid

    Crosskid Regular Member

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    i know this will seem hard but i jump up or duck and drive it back
     
  19. DinkAlot

    DinkAlot dcbadminton
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    Hmmmmm, that's interesting. Ducking to drive the shuttle back? You must be strong. :D
     
  20. cappy75

    cappy75 Regular Member

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    Heh! Maybe it's easy for you kiddo, but not for me:p. I am too old to be jumping around or doing the matrix bend-over without some postgame consequences:D! Ducking is easier but not as efficient as taking the shot early and doing something with it;).

    Also, I notice that having a lower perspective (while squatting) of the court makes it easier for me to judge whether a shot is going out or not.

    Strengthening lower leg muscles is the key to faster mobility on the court. Bodyweight calisthenics, rope skipping and footwork drills/exercises will do the trick.
     

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