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How do you gather data about your opponents?

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by timtimtimtimtim, Feb 3, 2008.

  1. timtimtimtimtim

    timtimtimtimtim New Member

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    Hey guys,
    I think this would be my first post, so I'll try to make it a good one. I want to learn how to analyze my opponents. How does one take notes about a players weak points and such. I know badminton player must probably has to know a lot about badminton in order to see certain flaws in other players and stuff. I guess I want to learn to watch my opponents, and take notes, about how they play and stuff. Can some of you guys give me a hand and give me some pointers, ideas or personal tips. I want to play smart. I've been trying to take notes, but the game goes by so fast that I don't know where to start to write or what to write down. Lately, when I'm playing, I can see my opponents move before they move.
     
  2. extremenanopowe

    extremenanopowe Regular Member

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    Not easy the game is so dynamic. Players keeps on improving their games.
     
  3. stumblingfeet

    stumblingfeet Regular Member

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    Some questions to ask:

    What are his most effective shots/tactics?

    What does he do when forced to play a shot under pressure?

    What are the shots with which he makes the most mistakes?

    A simple analysis for the above would be to simply draw a court, and mark down the locations onto that drawing. So, you'll need to answer those questions for each corner.
     
  4. ph_leung

    ph_leung Regular Member

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    This is how I do it. YMMV.

    I do not have any formal training so I learn what I believe to be proper technique by watching. I watch and re-watch training and competition videos and try to go to as many higher level competions as I can. When I'm waiting to play I always find players to practice analysing. I think this is important because even a player who is good may not know what they look like when playing. A benchmark for good technique and playing needs to be set and pros or training videos (Zhao Jian Hua/Xiao Jie, Lee Jae Bok, Gade, Rasmussen etc) are a way to see how it's done.

    Even if the player is beyond novice level they are likely have some of these remaining weaknesses: footwork, court positioning, backhands, fitness, and consistency. There's more but these are the more obvious ones.

    Watch the player when they are playing against others. Make a guess to where their weaknesses are. See if they repeatedly make the same mistakes when opponents push them into their "weak areas". When you get a chance to rally before a game, you can try to confirm your observations again. When the game begins, try to push against what you believe to be their weaknesses. Be careful with players who may hide their strengths.

    Watching a particular player compete against a superior opponent will bring out their weaknesses more obviously.

    You may not be right each time but with practice you should get better.
     
  5. robc06

    robc06 Regular Member

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    Hey

    This is a good question and many badminton players do not analyze their opponents. This is crucial when your going to be playing tournaments.

    If your playing these players constantly throughout a year. Buy a small book and make notes on how these players play against you or others. Whats their tactics. How they scored against you. How you scored against them.
     
  6. robc06

    robc06 Regular Member

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    As the year goes on, your database of players/tactics will expand and you can read the notes you made on how to play against them.

    Also reading an opponent a good coach will be able to help you. Where their strengths and weakness are.
     
  7. NoName1225

    NoName1225 Regular Member

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    Also, my prof(?) at Davis said, "if your opponent doesn't drop on you in 2 minutes, chances are they're never going to drop on you" What i think that means is that if your opponent doesn't make a certain move during a couple of points, s/he will be unlikely to pull that move and then you can just adjust to that play.
     
  8. robc06

    robc06 Regular Member

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    That maybe true but, what happens when a player only uses a particular shot every so often. The #1 SP in the state Rowan Henderson has a killer slice drop, he only uses this shot every so often so that players CANT read him.
     
  9. NoName1225

    NoName1225 Regular Member

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    true, reason why i said unlikely. Unlikely is not absolute, it's just a lesser chance
     
  10. asder

    asder Regular Member

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    If you can improve that ability while watching others play, it should help out. If possible, sit in line with the net. See how high people hit from the nets on their different shots. Sit on the end of the courts, see how often they land out, nearly out, one the line, close to the line, or shallow.

    When you sit at the end, when the person playing the shot, hits, see how the opponent reacts, how the person who hit reacts, would you move at the same speed, same direction, same racket position, or would you differ. See their foot work, are they running and putting stress on their legs, or gliding across the court with good movement. If they are putting stress on their legs, make that person run when you play against them, after one to two sets of 21 points, they should be very tired.

    I usually do this in my mind, because writing is slow and tedious compared to the eyes.

    Also observe when people hit the net, how close is it to the top of the net, with some people they just need some practise to make amazing drops, but don't know about it. Hope that helps somewhat.
     
  11. timtimtimtimtim

    timtimtimtimtim New Member

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    Thanks guys. I really appreciate you suggestions and help. I'm working something out. And the whole visualizing before the player makes the move is kinda risking as some have told me.
     

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