Thanks for visiting us!

Badminton Central is a free community for fans of badminton! If you find anything useful here please consider registering to see more content and get involved with our great community users, it takes less than 15 seconds! Everybody is welcome here.

Click here for a FREE account!

How do you test a new racquet for yourself?

Discussion in 'Badminton Rackets / Equipment' started by cobalt, Sep 30, 2010.

  1. cobalt

    cobalt Moderator

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2010
    Messages:
    8,905
    Likes Received:
    1
    Occupation:
    Yes
    Location:
    Arrakis
    I have been giving this some thought recently, and am wondering how most of you go about testing a new racquet for your own use. What is the check-list that you prepare (mentally at least) for this purpose? Here is what I could think of:

    1. Weight
    2. Balance Point
    3. Choice of string
    4. Tension range of string.
    5. Stiffness/flexibility of racquet, which needs to be considered along with choice of string.
    6. Swing speed

    Now, once you have made your choice of the physical specs etc, what conditions do you choose to actually test under? I think a lot of people test the racquet when they are fresh on court and in peak condition physically, but somehow I feel this is not the best thing to do. If you are going to use the racquet for more than 2 games in a session, then it makes sense to bring your physical condition to what it would be around the end of your session, to see if you are still comfortable with the racquet when your body has slowed down a bit, energy is lower, reflexes are slower.

    So I think we should test a racquet only after we have been actively on court for at least 90 minutes.

    I am curious to know what you all think.
     
  2. surajaya

    surajaya Regular Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2010
    Messages:
    111
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Indonesia
    7. Frame stability
     
  3. visor

    visor Regular Member

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2009
    Messages:
    13,525
    Likes Received:
    262
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    I don't think you have to be on court for that long before testing a new racket.

    If you have a regular racket that you're familiar with, then even playing with a new racket in the first game, you will immediately discern the difference in power, speed, maneuverability, etc.
     
  4. arfandy

    arfandy Regular Member

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2009
    Messages:
    915
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    China, Thailand, & Indonesia
    can i ask, how would you choose a new unstrung racket that suit your preference other than only reading the racket specs & positive suggestion?

    If the racket has been purchased and strung, then the first 5-min on court should be enough to determine whether the racket&string combination suits you or not. Or else, you'll just have to get used to the racket, not the other way round.
     
  5. gavinloh

    gavinloh Regular Member

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2009
    Messages:
    46
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Malaysia
    There is no way to tell unless you tested it in the court with real play. One man's meat is another man's poison. Not neccesary the popular racquet would be suitable for you.

    Example, I bought and tested the popular 8DX and it not really suit me as compare with NS9900. Thinking to get a 2nd unit of NS9900.
     
  6. Yoppy

    Yoppy Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2009
    Messages:
    2,832
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Sydney
    Actually it can also be done in a reverse or a blind test way. Sometimes i test a racket without knowing the specs whatsoever in the first place. Only afterward i can feel and roughly guess the specs, this is mainly to the weight/stiffness/BP. Its not too hard at all once get use to it.

    As for the string, unfortunately im very2 picky with the tension and string size. Any string smaller than 0.67 or bigger than 0.7 or tension higher/lower that 28to26lbs i will hate it straight away. Again, once get used to it it is very easy to detect if this is not your range.

    The rest of attributes such as swing speed/solidness/material/design/size/paint work/etc are very interesting because this is where the surprising elements come to play. You will find that some you will like and some you dont. I found that YY is lately quite boring (with the exception of the 3 players series) compare to LN Carlton Wilson (I like some of their design, really cool), Flypower (woven tech & super aerodynamic frame), Apacs (6U superlight racket). All these so called innovations/modifications will alter the feel of the racket when you test them.
     
  7. cobalt

    cobalt Moderator

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2010
    Messages:
    8,905
    Likes Received:
    1
    Occupation:
    Yes
    Location:
    Arrakis
    I am not so sure it works for many of us, though. Your method would work fine for someone whose fitness levels can be maintained unchanged for over 2 hours on court, so we are talking about professional or at least advanced and maybe the younger, intermediate players. I could start out fresh and fit and try out a realy stiff and heavy racquet and love its explosive power in singles; an hour later it will feel like a stick of lead!:(:crying:

    Ideally I would like to be able to play with a racquet that is more "forgiving" of my physical condition and assists me, rather than becomes a liability as the sessions progress.

    I am sure I am not alone on the BC forum to have fitness issues that include fatigue, slowing down and stiffness after more than an hour on court.

    Recently, I bought a racquet and fell in love with it after playing a few games over a couple of sessions. Then I had an extended session that left me a bit fatigued, and it felt like the strings had lost their tension, the racquet would not swing correctly, my clears turned into frustrating mush, and my smashes had the opponents doubling up with laughter. :(:eek::mad::crying:
    :):):)

    Now, I suppose ANY racquet would feel like a piece of wood at that stage. But my point was to try and find a middle stage in testing where the racquet's characteristics would assist my deficiencies, rather than magnify them.
     
  8. cobalt

    cobalt Moderator

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2010
    Messages:
    8,905
    Likes Received:
    1
    Occupation:
    Yes
    Location:
    Arrakis
    Yoppy, I can see the point of using a certain type and diameter of string. But don't you think that tension is also dependant on the other characteristics of the racquet, e.g. frame stiffness, heaviness, shaft stiffness etc?
     
  9. cobalt

    cobalt Moderator

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2010
    Messages:
    8,905
    Likes Received:
    1
    Occupation:
    Yes
    Location:
    Arrakis
    Well, when I proposed "testing" I did mean to do it for an extended session like game-play or at least an extended practise session. The question was, under what physical conditions would it make most sense to do the test? Sorry if I wasn't clear earlier on... :)
     
  10. visor

    visor Regular Member

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2009
    Messages:
    13,525
    Likes Received:
    262
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    I see: you're concerned about how the racket feels when you're tired and at the end of the session.

    IMO, by that time the legs are more tired than the arms.

    So, it is a problem with footwork more so than with a racket being too stiff or too bead heavy.

    Usually by that time, I call it quits to avoid any bad habits or injuries.
     
  11. cobalt

    cobalt Moderator

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2010
    Messages:
    8,905
    Likes Received:
    1
    Occupation:
    Yes
    Location:
    Arrakis
    Not so much a problem with footwork as the loss of energy overall. And it is not necessarily at the absolute end of the session. When coordination starts going a bit off, the racquet comes down at the wrong angle and speed, and everything goes to hell. At that stage, if I had a racquet that would "extend my court life" by one more game and which I could still use with greater consistency than others, would it be safe to say that that would be a good choice? Would it be a better choice than the racquet I started the day with? Or should I have 2 different racquets, my "robust condition" racquet and my "slipping away" racquet? :confused::)

    Oh and BTW, if my legs dont move, I dont lift my arms. Period. ;):)
     
  12. visor

    visor Regular Member

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2009
    Messages:
    13,525
    Likes Received:
    262
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    ^^^
    I've noticed this effect too as the evening wears on.

    That's why I have 2 T2's: one 86g 288mm with ZM67@23lb for when I'm robust, vs another 84g 284mm with ZM67@21lb for when I'm weak.
     
  13. kwun

    kwun Administrator

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2002
    Messages:
    39,269
    Likes Received:
    540
    Occupation:
    BC Janitor
    Location:
    Santa Clara, CA, USA
    8. feel - to me one of the more important one.
     
  14. cobalt

    cobalt Moderator

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2010
    Messages:
    8,905
    Likes Received:
    1
    Occupation:
    Yes
    Location:
    Arrakis
    Next project for Dan: a racquet with a sliding BP mechanism in the shaft. ;):cool::)
     
  15. cobalt

    cobalt Moderator

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2010
    Messages:
    8,905
    Likes Received:
    1
    Occupation:
    Yes
    Location:
    Arrakis
    could you elaborate for us, Kwun?
     
  16. jymbalaya

    jymbalaya Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2007
    Messages:
    1,205
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    United States
    its how the racket feels when you hit with it. Its hard to explain, but most rackets have a distinct feeling when you hit, even though they may play similarly. if you don't like how a racket feels when you hit, it will be hard to play with it.
     
  17. cobalt

    cobalt Moderator

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2010
    Messages:
    8,905
    Likes Received:
    1
    Occupation:
    Yes
    Location:
    Arrakis
    But that's exactly the thing! It may feel 10/10 when you start your session, but half-way through or say an hour later when your physical condition is not the same as earlier, it may feel 7/10 while another racquet that earlier felt 7/10 may now feel 8/10. :(:confused::) Read Visor's post....

     
  18. Yoppy

    Yoppy Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2009
    Messages:
    2,832
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Sydney
    good point, i actually never thought about that.

    i guess the way i work it out is to get the feel with the string characteristics (both size & tension) then link that to the racket characteristic. This is in a way to prevent the string characteristic to misled the way you think about the racket.

    But on the other hand (as the point you made), it can backfire. Lets say for example a very flex racket with a tick string and a very high tension, i would imagine the string bed will snap back a lot faster than the racket shaft response, and this can potentially create an ackward feeling and a problem with shot accuracy. Fortunately, so far i have not experience this problem in a great deal manner. Perhaps because my choice of racket is more or less consistent with my tension requirement.
     
  19. Yoppy

    Yoppy Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2009
    Messages:
    2,832
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Sydney
    On your point about the stamina/physical condition issue, i think it's more likely to be consistent regardless what racket you are testing. After 90mins of play it is obvious that you strength is less, so theoritically your racket movement will be slower (unless for some, they just warmed up :) ). So if you test a racket at the begining and it already feels not right for you, im not too sure how it will become better after you play it for 90mins. This is on the assumption that time for getting used to the racket is zero.

    I can also see your point of having a certain life span in a badminton session. i often felt like a death chicken after 3hrs of baddy and felt the racket that i used early on i cant handle no more. For me i sometimes just simply switch my racket with the one more forgiving and adjust my game speed slower.
     
  20. what07

    what07 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2009
    Messages:
    915
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Pharmacy Techinician/University student
    Location:
    Toronto
    A test I usually do is if I can do a bunch of clears comfortably for about 30 mins with the same racket and have a consistent clear from my rear court to the opponents rear court then it passes for me.

    After that, play a game and if the racket performs 10/10 then I take a 15min break then play a 2nd game, if the racket performs 8/10 or higher then I say the racket is good enough for me and passes. I don't usually play more then 2 games a day because after that I get so lazy I don't even move around the court.

    If I were to have 2 rackets for game play then both would have to be the same BP/weights but one would be less stiff.
    E.g Nanospeed 9000x then for the 2nd game nanospeed 9000s.

    I already know that after the first game my footwork and movement decreases from 10/10 to 7/10 so to compensate I would put more energy to moving around the court to engage the shuttle then to actually have 10/10 when hitting it. So having a less stiff shaft would help in not losing as much power.
     

Share This Page