Thanks for visiting us!

Badminton Central is a free community for fans of badminton! If you find anything useful here please consider registering to see more content and get involved with our great community users, it takes less than 15 seconds! Everybody is welcome here.

Click here for a FREE account!

how long can one take to serve?

Discussion in 'Rules / Tournament Regulation / Officiating' started by decoy, Jan 27, 2011.

  1. decoy

    decoy Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2009
    Messages:
    672
    Likes Received:
    9
    Location:
    Maritime canada
    I am not sure if their is a rule about this or not. But is it against any rules that when you have the shuttle and are about to serve how much time are you allowed before you actually start the motion of your serve? Im sorry if im not explaining this question well enough please help.
     
  2. LD rules!

    LD rules! Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2009
    Messages:
    6,179
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Earth
    Are you meaning time between points ? Or time in which you stand with the shuttle ready to serve ?
     
  3. LD rules!

    LD rules! Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2009
    Messages:
    6,179
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Earth
    if it's the 2nd option, I don't think there is any specific rule as to the time taken, but I presume it's at the umpires discretion as to how long you take to serve.
     
  4. decoy

    decoy Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2009
    Messages:
    672
    Likes Received:
    9
    Location:
    Maritime canada
    What I mean is that my friend to whom I play with a lot takes the shuttle once im in my ready position and he waits like 10-15 seconds before actually starting his swing so I didnt know if there was a rule against that or not.
     
  5. extremenanopowe

    extremenanopowe Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2005
    Messages:
    12,272
    Likes Received:
    2
    Occupation:
    Chief Coach. Get only NCAP/NROC certified coach. C
    Location:
    SG. Go for NCAP-L2 certified coach.
    haha.. u do the same back to him... but longer.. see how he reacts.. ;)
     
  6. Sampat

    Sampat Regular Member

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2009
    Messages:
    29
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Pune
    I saw recently in the Malaysia open, umpire giving warning to a player for taking long time to serve..so I hope here should be some rule definitely.
     
  7. alexh

    alexh Regular Member

    Joined:
    May 19, 2009
    Messages:
    407
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Adelaide, Australia
    The rule is "neither side shall cause undue delay..." (Laws of badminton rule 9.1.1). But they don't say how many seconds is an "undue delay", so it's at the discretion of the umpire. I've heard people say that up to five seconds is reasonable, but that's not an official rule. 15 seconds is definitely too long.
     
  8. keigo911

    keigo911 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2005
    Messages:
    295
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Research Student
    Location:
    Seri Kembangan, Malaysia
    yes, there is no specific time frame listed down, coz it's kinda hard for the umpire and service judge to look at stop watch and the players. Therefore it's up to the umpire decision. In typical case, it's about 5-7 seconds, counting from the moment when both sides ready to serve and receive. Usually, umpire use heart count/finger count.

     
  9. K1NGK0N

    K1NGK0N Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2010
    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    HK
    There is no Hard & fast rule..but anything more than 5 sec will 'unnecessary delay'

    9. SERVICE
    [FONT=Times New Roman,Times New Roman][FONT=Times New Roman,Times New Roman]9.1 In a correct service,
    9.1.1 neither side shall cause undue delay to the delivery of the service once the server and the receiver are ready for the service. On completion of the backward movement of server’s racket head, any delay in the start of the service (Law 9.2), shall be considered to be an undue delay;
    [/FONT]
    [/FONT]
     
  10. chris-ccc

    chris-ccc Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2006
    Messages:
    26,910
    Likes Received:
    11
    Occupation:
    Professional Badminton Coach & Badminton Promoter
    Location:
    Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    Sooner or later the Laws of Badminton will be more specific

    .
    Sooner or later the Laws of Badminton will be more specific - regarding 'unnecessary delay'.

    Today, umpires make sure that during intervals, a stop watch is triggered to make sure that no more than the specified time allowed is being misused.
    .
     
  11. alexh

    alexh Regular Member

    Joined:
    May 19, 2009
    Messages:
    407
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Adelaide, Australia
    This applies to the interval between games and to the mid-game interval, right? They're not using a stopwatch between every single point?
     
  12. taneepak

    taneepak Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2004
    Messages:
    6,527
    Likes Received:
    6
    Occupation:
    Designing and producing quality feather shuttlecoc
    Location:
    Hong Kong
    It all depends on what is undue delay. My understanding is that undue delay means any delay longer than necessary to deliver a serve. This means that if the receiver is ready, the server must serve immediately and a serve starts with the first backward movement of the server's racket. This also means that there should not be any delay after the back swing of the serve and the forward movement of the serve must be immediate.
    So undue delay applies to these two areas.
     
  13. chris-ccc

    chris-ccc Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2006
    Messages:
    26,910
    Likes Received:
    11
    Occupation:
    Professional Badminton Coach & Badminton Promoter
    Location:
    Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    Stopwatch is triggered to check that specified time allowed is not being misused

    .
    Correct. Currently stopwatch is only being triggered at intervals occurring at mid-game and between games.
    .
     
  14. Matt

    Matt Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2002
    Messages:
    4,079
    Likes Received:
    4
    Occupation:
    IT Developer
    Location:
    Richmond, BC
    Yes that is crorect. It is about 5 seconds - any longer is a delay of game.
     
  15. raceto21

    raceto21 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2009
    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    usa
    any updates to this question? people still agree its still "just" 5-7 seconds?
    varying your initial service stroke can be an effective strategy in controlling the pace of the game.
     
  16. CantSmashThis

    CantSmashThis Regular Member

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2008
    Messages:
    1,052
    Likes Received:
    12
    Location:
    United States
    There is no definitive answer. It is all up to the umpire on how long it really takes for it to be considered a delay of game. The umpire certainly doesn't have a stop watch or count in his head how much time has passed. It is all up to the judgement of the umpire to if it feels like quite has time has passed.

    So the answer to this question varies, from umpire to umpire.
     
  17. chris-ccc

    chris-ccc Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2006
    Messages:
    26,910
    Likes Received:
    11
    Occupation:
    Professional Badminton Coach & Badminton Promoter
    Location:
    Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    .
    Most umpire would warn the players by saying "Play on, Play on".

    If them players do not, probably a warning card should be shown to them.
    .
     
  18. CantSmashThis

    CantSmashThis Regular Member

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2008
    Messages:
    1,052
    Likes Received:
    12
    Location:
    United States
    Yes, there will usually be a verbal warning before action is taken.
     
  19. 2wheels04

    2wheels04 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2005
    Messages:
    154
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Cal Central
    how long can one take to serve? - as long as it is not unfair

    Ah, you are reviving a dormant thread!

    The astute readers appear not to be in agreement for any given number for the time, and it has also been mentioned that this is also umpire related. All this may be true.

    It is not entirely up to the umpire, it is up to the players; the umpire just gets an idea about what is going to bother one player or the other.

    Just think, or if not, check out some videos, to get an idea of this time. If I were to inquire, how many seconds elapse from when the shuttle is dead to when the shuttle is actually put in play, what would you say?

    Methinks, the answer to this query in this thread is that the actual time depends on the game and the match situation. And the fellow in the high chair has to keep his fingers on the pulse and make certain there is no unfair practice used by players.

    There will be times in a game, when after a particularly all-court battle, lets say in a mens singles, that both players are behaving like a fish, you know, gasping for air and all. At this time, any good umpire will not force the issue.

    There will be a time during the same game, when one player is ready to serve (or receive) and the opponent is not. Now, this becomes a tactical ploy. This is unfair means, so the arbitrator steps in. "Play," is all the instruction the player will need to re-focus, and usually this does the trick.

    Some players, especially in singles, both in mens and womens circuit, take anywhere between 13 to 21 seconds between when the shuttle is dead and when it is put in play.

    They also take a scenic tour of their court, starting from the umpire-side sideline, toward the coach/baseline, then to the service judge side sideline, then pick up shuttle, then take the sweat off the brow and face, then ask for a shuttle change. Some of the time, the scenic tour taken by one player may be counter clockwise direction, the opponent clockwise. Is this what the spectators came to see? The short answer is, they came to see the player play at his/her very best level and execute some deft net-play, softest of net-tumblers, loopy rainbows, searing smashes down the sidelines, and crisp drops in open court. Is this fair to the spectators who paid enormous monies and are spending their time?

    I know one umpire who had faulted a mens doubles team for undue delay when he took 7 seconds to deliver the serve. This was before the interval in the opening game. This same player was serving between 3 and 4 seconds in the beginning. Guess what happened for the rest of that match? There were no more funny business from his team.
     
    #19 2wheels04, Jan 11, 2012
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2012
  20. raceto21

    raceto21 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2009
    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    usa
    @2wheels - i appreciate your input.
    i believe tennis has a 20-25 second rule to serve once a ball goes out of play. maybe this is something the badminton high echelon can look into and then implement a similar rule (mindful of the game of badminton) to "prevent any unfair play/unfair advantage."
    lastly, it would be a delight if badminton central can have a resource person- like an umpire in this case- to direct us to the official and correct answers to our queries.
     

Share This Page