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How to coach aggression

Discussion in 'Coaching Forum' started by Yipom, Feb 20, 2010.

  1. Yipom

    Yipom Regular Member

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    I'm asking for advice here from other experienced coaches

    I've been coaching at a local high school for about 4 years now. My first few years were great our team made the provincials every year which a strong mix of boys and girls. But for the pass 2 years, this year mainly most of our veteren players have graduated. Therefore leaving me with our back ups from last year. They've been playing on and off and I don't think it's enough, but we are still going to the provincial tournament this year with a weak girls side.

    Well some of their techqnies are ok but still hve alot of room for improvement. But from what Im seeing alot of them are flat lining. The main reason I believe that they r not improving is because lack o aggression....

    These kids are too nice! They dot mind losing that much... Which makes me question their desire to win...

    So I'm just wondering what can I do to make them more agressive with the attack and have more fire coming out of their veins. And for future references, how do u guys select complete beginners to develop?
     
  2. Lordofthefart

    Lordofthefart Regular Member

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    From a sociological stand point, these kids will grow up to be good people. It is good that they are not partaking in the winner loser culture outlined by Ian Taylor.

    That point aside if you want to build aggression and a drive to win there is a couple ways. They are affective depending on how strong willed your kids are. I know my old coach used humiliation in order to make us ashamed to give anything less than your best. I don't like this one because it can hurt the kid's self esteem if you go too far.

    The one I like the best is having the constant challenging system. That is to say the back ups are always allowed to challenge for a spot on the actual team. That keeps everyone on their toes and thus they need to keep working. One point to consider is that you need a good reason to be on the team aside from playing in tournaments. One thing I suggest is more playing time.
     
  3. jug8man

    jug8man Regular Member

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    1) place some mannequins at side line smash and cross smash locations.

    2) Cut out a real size picture of opponent* face and stick on mannequin

    3) Let the kids smash their heart / lungs out (screaming n shouting is good too)

    *If you are an *rse of a coach, you subsitute with your own picture
     
  4. visor

    visor Regular Member

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    Hahaha! I like this suggestion, very inventive and effective!:D
    Let them get in touch with their raw side...
     
  5. Lordofthefart

    Lordofthefart Regular Member

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    That almost sounds like it's too much fun lol. Don't know about aggression but that will certainly make practices more fun.

    I forgot to mention something, it builds aggression but it's not nice. You need a hate figure. Someone that is good enough to be respected but that no one likes. If you demonize this person then you'll have a stronger group bond.
     

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