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How to improve Smash power.

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by shahkiz, Feb 22, 2012.

  1. shahkiz

    shahkiz Regular Member

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    Want to ask all members about this matter.
    I've been training badminton for about 4years.But still,my smash does not improve.Opponent easily lift up my smash.How can i improve my smash power?
    And really sorry for my bad english =)
     
  2. visor

    visor Regular Member

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    get a coach and take some lessons

    use a head heavier racket

    look up on youtube "fu haifeng teaches how to smash"
     
  3. venkatesh

    venkatesh Regular Member

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    maybe you should focus more on the placement and not the power. nowadays, it's hard to make a kill by smashing from the rear court. try watching mixed doubles. even the girls can well lift a powerful smash. and sometimes, even the girls can smash kill from the rear court to the guy, even with weaker power. it's all about the placement and angle.
     
  4. shahkiz

    shahkiz Regular Member

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    thnks for the advice mate. :)
     
  5. riffsuad

    riffsuad Regular Member

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    use pronation technique and try to master it.
     
  6. R20190

    R20190 Regular Member

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    For a powerful smash you need to be able to use your whole body to generate the power. Although there are those who can produce a lot of power just by using the wrist and elbow.

    Power comes from your legs, waist, shoulder, elbow and wrist rotation. This is how I've always taught the smash: Your aim is increase the racquet head speed as much as possible. As each of those body parts form a pivot and leverarm, you are multiplying the power/speed as you utilise each effectively.

    Assuming you have the general technique right...

    If you start by analyising your wrist action by fixing the rest of your body. Get a partner to feed you lifts for you to smash, try and play a smash without moving any other part of your body, only your wrist. Then gradually add each part in turn to your stroke. So, wrist, then wrist and elbow, then wrist, elbow and shoulder etc. You will soon see that with each additional "leverarm" you ar multiplying your power. That's the first thing.

    The second thing is that, may be you already have the power but you are being "robbed" of it by making errors.

    One of the main errors people make, that robs them of power, is getting the racquet face completely flat at the point of contact with the shuttle. A tilted racquet face will significantly reduce your power and accuracy.

    Supination and Pronation - I've always felt that it is not necessary to insist on someone to continually concentrate on doing this. A novice should be taught to mimick the correct action (which includes supination and pronation) and gradually build it into their stroke. By forcing a player to consciously think about doing it and to "bolt" it on to their technique will make it feel unnatural. The primary objective is to get the racquet face flat/square at the point of contact with the shuttle.

    Sweetspot - this is true for all strokes. But for such as fast action as a smash, your timing needs to be perfect. So a lot of people actually lose power by not striking the shuttle against the sweetspot.

    As your technique develops, you may want to hone in on your accuracy, placement and perhaps learn to jump smash or round the head smash etc.
     
  7. riffsuad

    riffsuad Regular Member

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    i like your explanation. i have problem to get sweetspot, Can u show where the point of contact with shuttle and sweetspot in real picture. view front behind and front body.
     
  8. shahkiz

    shahkiz Regular Member

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    nice explanation.I make sure to use it and improve my smash..Really good advice for me as amateur player =)
     
  9. R20190

    R20190 Regular Member

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    The location of the sweetspot on different racquets is different. Sometimes the sweetspot on two identical racquets strung differently can be different too.

    So it is down to your own feeling as to where the sweetspot is. A good way to find out quickly is to get a partner to play "drives" with you, both forehand and backhand. You will notice that as you adjust the position of impact on the string bed, it will feel different. The sweetspot will be the position where the shuttle feels crisp and gives the least vibration/twisting of the racquet. Also you should note the sound of each shot, again, it should sound clean and crisp.

    If you don't have a partner, try doing the above against a wall.

    As you get used to the feeling, you will be able to pick up any racquet and find the sweetspot almost right away.
     
  10. the_mentalist

    the_mentalist Regular Member

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    Assuming we have two players who have a correct technique in smashing..
    Maybe the same rackets with the same tension and string..
    So, what makes their smash power or speed different??
     
  11. R20190

    R20190 Regular Member

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    That's a bit of an open question really. It could be anything... their build, physical strength/mental strength, mood, enthusiasm etc...

    Even if someone has the correct technique, they may not have good timing or ability.

    I've seen lots of players who have style over substance... looks good (technique-wise) but aren't actually very good!
     
  12. riffsuad

    riffsuad Regular Member

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    what is position our hand during smash, straight up above the shoulder or slightly out above our shoulder?
     
  13. jn_suzhou

    jn_suzhou Regular Member

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    learning and improving the smash technique takes time and gradual. Eventhough i know that pronation is very important in generating power of the smash and i think that i'm doing it already but that is not in reality. A very good reality check is to watch the form of the pros when smashing from the start until the finish of execution, your eyes will be used to this form while watching videos and high level players and then video yourself or watch your self in the mirror as you do your smash technique. You will be surprised how different your form from others.

    I would suggest to learn to improve your smash by phase and not try to get all the correct things at once..
    first learn that side on and body rotation is important.
    next try to incorporate the pronation (as best as you think). there are many videos and documentation about the pronation...video by theim (not sure about spelling) is a good one.
    then,, learn about the biomechanics of the smash...about how the different limbs, body parts rotates..some technical analysis is here in BC by Phil.
    then during this process always video yourself and compare with others. then try to improve on the stroke where yours is different.
    Just one thing i can share is that i little change in your form, you notice some difference.

    Good luck.
     
  14. R20190

    R20190 Regular Member

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    I've never thought about it in that way to be honest. Your hand can be anywhere from above your head, ranging from a conventional overhead stroke to a round the head stroke. The main thing to remember is that your arm should not be completely straight - some people think it should be straight (like bowling in cricket) but it should actually be slightly bent to prevent injury.
     
  15. ssgg007

    ssgg007 Regular Member

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  16. shahkiz

    shahkiz Regular Member

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    thanks for the advice and tips..IT'll be a good use to all members in BC forum =)
     
  17. betazone

    betazone Regular Member

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    Hi, I am giving my 2 cents worth. This is based on what I hv done so far and I noticed a noticeable increase in smash power
    - up the string tension from normal
    - get a stiff racquet
    - do core muscles training
    - do resistance tube training, try to mimic the smashing motion.
    - checkout Fu Hai Feng smashing guide video at youtube. In it you noticed he said use your abs/core muscles to press your body down and smash. (i think he also said alot of players thought they must use alot of arm power, but it is not true)
    - i disagree about locking or not locking your elbow. It is all a matter of personal preference. Jung Jae Sung locks his elbow and he has hell of a smash!

    good luck.
     
  18. jn_suzhou

    jn_suzhou Regular Member

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    for the string tension, what i understand is that the higher the tension is for more control and not power. Lower tensions is where the power similar to a trampoline effect.

    Also, if you lock your elbow, i read the you will be at risk of developing the tennis elbow, in this case baminton elbow :)
     
  19. R20190

    R20190 Regular Member

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    jn_suzhou, what you've said is correct. As you increase string tension you lose power, but gain control, feel and shuttle response (less string bed dwell time). A lot of people confuse this shuttle response and the crisp sound and feel of highly strung strings with gaining more power – which is a bit of an illusion.

    If you lock your elbow, what you’re doing is you are stretching your tendons and ligaments to their limit and colliding the joint with each stroke. Having said that, everyone is built differently and so different people can abuse their bodies more than others. Not locking you elbow fully is the conventional advice I have heard echoed by the best coaches throughout my time in playing the sport – whether or not it is done is up to the individual.

    Also, I personally don’t see any deficit in power by not fully locking one’s elbow when playing a smash.
     
  20. visor

    visor Regular Member

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    Agree. Please don't fully lock out your elbow on any power shots like clear or smash.

    As an example, you can imagine what would happen to your knee joint if you lock it fully straight when you land after jumping. All the forces would be transmitted to the knee joint cartilage itself instead of being absorbed by muscles and tendons.
     
    #20 visor, Feb 28, 2012
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2012

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