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how to play front in doubles

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by Rainier, Apr 24, 2010.

  1. Rainier

    Rainier New Member

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    can any1 give me any tips playing front? i keep screwing up when i was playing doubles with my partner in 1 of our league games for our school team.
    he says that i need to work on footwork, body control, stability, reflexes, and to stop jumping since i cant jump smash all that good. ><
     
  2. druss

    druss Regular Member

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    Sounds like you need more time with your coach than anything. You won't be able to learn everything via online tips. There are some videos on youtube that might help.
     
  3. Crynge

    Crynge Regular Member

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    be sure to keep your racket up at ALL TIMES,
    i dont know if this will make sense but what i do is i pay attention to where my partner smashes, and the moment they block or drive it back or something i move to where they are hitting it to try to intercept it
     
  4. kkmh2

    kkmh2 Regular Member

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    what druss said is true, it really is quite impossible for anyone to read some tips online and be able to put them to practice straight away. my advice would be to stand a step/half a step behind the service line when your partner is smashing, that way at least you can cover more of the court and (hopefully) make less mistakes.
     
  5. LD rules!

    LD rules! Regular Member

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    Go on to YouTube, and watch CY/FHF or KKK/TBH and watch KKK and CY especially, and how they intercept, etc
     
  6. Danstevens

    Danstevens Regular Member

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    This is certainly a good idea - Cai Yun and Fu Haifeng are probably the "textbook" models of attacking badminton doubles. It's brilliant how one of them (usually CY) is looking to get to the net to release his partner to hit smashes. The OP should be looking to do the same for his partner.

    My first piece of advice would be to get your racket on everything you can - own the net and try not to let anything get by you if you can avoid it. By playing the net you're either looking for a lift for your partner to attack or a loose shot for you to kill so apply lots of pressure. It you can hit a shot tight to the net (and make sure it's tight) that is often a good option because you can close the net down further and force your opponents in to lifting. Cutting a shot off with a fast, flat drive in to an open space in to court is another great way to make your opponents stretch. Be sure to take the shuttle as early and as high above the net as possible in order to give yourself the best shot and to take more time away from your opponents. Your anticipation and movement are important at the net if you are to get on everything. You have to learn to read the game and know which shot is coming next almost before it is played, this will give you some more time to get your racket to the shuttle and play a good shot. One final point - if you think you'll struggle to reach a slightly high shot, it's probably best to leave it for your partner because at the net, it's very easy to hit those late and just send them floating in to the mid-court.

    As has been said already, sorting out your net game is something that can only be done after actually seeing you in action so it's probably one for a more local player or coach but if you could possibly video a doubles game and upload it to somewhere, I'm sure that there are plenty of people here (me included) that would happily take a look at it and offer you some more specific pointers.
     
  7. raymond

    raymond Regular Member

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    A few more important points for your racket speed -

    1. Choke up your grip
    2. No/little back swing, esp. to attack low/tight net shots.
    3. Learn to hit shots around your body without changing grip (i.e. if you hit last shot with backhand grip, continue to use backhand grip for fast exchange).
    4. At the front, you probably don't need to jump (for height) but rather leap for distance to aggressive attack loose slower net shot.
    5. Practice your net return under pressure. In addition to find a coach, how about find a coaching DVD, there're quite a few, including "Advanced Badminton" at Amazon. I think these types of DVD might be better for you to start with, then you can watch the Youtube videos mentioned here.
    6. Watch this video:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bWkkM36Y_90&feature=related
     
    #7 raymond, Apr 25, 2010
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2010
  8. Rainier

    Rainier New Member

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    oo, ty guys. uhm ive started to jump less, my footwork got alot better just from practicing it for like an hour.

    I went to a ymca with 3 friends and i think i got alot better just from playing it with remembering what to do.
    uhm can any1 u guys give me advice on how to do a backhand clear from the net?
     
  9. gingerphil79

    gingerphil79 Regular Member

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    Make sure you have a short thumb grip and jus hit the thing. 5 mins of practicing this and you should have it good
     
  10. GT0ro

    GT0ro Regular Member

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    it's not always your fault. could be your partner. could be smashing at wrong spots. or he/she has a weak smash, easily read... could be a lot of things... not always the front court player.

     
  11. druss

    druss Regular Member

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    While that may be true, you still need to be able to adapt and take a more aggressive or defensive role as required.

    If you have a strong doubles partner behind you, you need to learn to be more aggressive and take advantage of weak returns. If you have a weak partner you may take a step or two back expecting harder drive returns. Either way, whether in the back or up front, in any sort of doubles, you need to adapt to your partner. Much easier when it's always the same partner of course.

    I really find that footwork and positioning is key when at the front playing doubles. Always keep track of where the shuttle has passed you to the back and adjust position to cover the cross court if possible. Also helps to know what types of shots your partner favours (body, between opponents, alleys... etc).

    Coaching and experience will get you to where you want to be.
     

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