Thanks for visiting us!

Badminton Central is a free community for fans of badminton! If you find anything useful here please consider registering to see more content and get involved with our great community users, it takes less than 15 seconds! Everybody is welcome here.

Click here for a FREE account!

how to smash

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by StormShaker, Mar 23, 2010.

  1. StormShaker

    StormShaker New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2009
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Student
    Location:
    Scarborough
    Sorry, I don't know how to create a new thread so I am going to post my question here. If you disagree with my choice of posting a new question in a thread then please, simply ignore it, however, I would appreciate if someone answered.

    I having a really hard problem getting power in my smash. My racket model is Head Nano Power 700 strung with Yonex BG-65 Titanium, at a tension of 23 lbs. My power is ok, I can clear cross court easily. I play singles.

    It's really frustrating when in a match when I have the perfect chance at half court to end the rally with a smash, but when I smash the opponent clears it back.

    I am good at making the players run hard and my accuracy is good. Usually I win with my smashes because they are accurate, but it's really slow. I have a really good player on my school team, an India national player, and I keep losing to him because he smashes hard, REALLY HARD, with insane accuracy. I want that power.

    Should I focus on technique or strength training? please be specfic.
     
  2. lukasek97

    lukasek97 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2009
    Messages:
    67
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    UK
    Well first try to be more accurate + better angle and then put more power in
    mostly smashes aren't just about power it's about placement of the smash too
     
  3. visor

    visor Regular Member

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2009
    Messages:
    13,663
    Likes Received:
    291
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    Perhaps you're not using forearm pronation?
     
  4. gingerphil79

    gingerphil79 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2007
    Messages:
    594
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Sports massage therapist
    Location:
    Northern Ireland, UK
    I have to wonder at your accuracy more than power. If the shot is hit half court by ur opponent, most people have a decent smash to be able to kill the shuttle but if your opponent is getting it back, 1 has to wonder where the shuttle is being hit to??.

    In this case either make the smash very steep cause u r closer up the court or as with singles hit the shuttle down the sides. If he does get it back, he will prob be out of position due to having to reach to the side to retrieve the shuttle

    Read this article and watch the video below

    http://badminton-coach.co.uk/484/three-simple-tips-to-increase-the-power-of-your-badminton-smash/

    http://badminton-coach.co.uk/492/improving-your-badminton-smash-exercise-3/
     
  5. kooltuo

    kooltuo New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2010
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Canada
    That's a useful website!

    Especially like the video. And his accent. haha
     
  6. perfectgravity

    perfectgravity Regular Member

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2010
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    GTA
    [FONT=&quot]Lol so you want to learn how to smash and talk with a British accent?
    [/FONT]



    [FONT=&quot]Thanks for the video, it is helpful
    [/FONT]
     
  7. gamepurpose

    gamepurpose Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2009
    Messages:
    415
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    unemployeed
    Location:
    garden grove
    In my opinion,
    the factors for making your smash harder is
    String high tension
    fast stroke (obviously with high tension the faster the stroke the more power you'll generate)
    Jump smash.

    In jump smash you need to learn or practice how can you transfer your power from bottom of leg to your racquet. Easier to say is you have to know how to snap your leg and body at the right moment.
    Some people able to do jump smash hard without the body snap compare to they're being on the ground. Because if you're in the higher angle the harder the smash gonna be. Steeper angle = harder smash. (if we compare two exactly identical power being use in these two different smashes.
    I'm only 5'4", but I can create a faster smash than my brother, he's taller 1 in. (lol hey still taller) he was in navy, so yes imagine how stronger he is.
    For now my smashes are faster because my technique is correct, and he doesn't have the correct technique.
     
  8. lukasek97

    lukasek97 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2009
    Messages:
    67
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    UK
    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    You don't need high tension
     
  9. Wong8Egg

    Wong8Egg Regular Member

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2004
    Messages:
    1,611
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Toronto
    I used to have a similar problem too. When I used mostly my shoulder and arm to smash. Itconsume alot of energy but the bird travel slowly and the angle was bad.

    And then my coach told me rather to use raw power, I should really focus on the speed of the swing and snap the wrist at contact. And the result was stunning.

    Maybe instead of hitting really hard. Try to work on your stroke and make your swing smoother and faster.

    Hope this help.
     
  10. keith.roche

    keith.roche Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2009
    Messages:
    187
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Dubai, United Arab Emirates, U
    well.. its better to play against people of your own league...
    mileage may vary from one person to another..
    I remember having played against a junior national ranked player, and one high service, or lift, would end the rally with a powerful smash.. LOL
    He might be of a level much higher than you. So train hard. Train Train Train until you are satisfied, which doesnt happen usually. :D At least not easy for me.
     
  11. starx

    starx Regular Member

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2006
    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    court
    StormShaker, you must trening technic and listen your coach, any racket that does not help.
     
  12. dltgld

    dltgld Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2009
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Winnipeg
    how to smash...

    I will assume that you know how to swing a racquet using a proper forehand overhead swinging technique (contact the bird high, turn your wrist from supinated->pronated position as you swing it, snap the wrist after pronating to add even more power, etc etc etc) to begin with.
    Couple things that make it difficult to defend a smash:

    1. Angle
    It's okay if you cannot smash as fast as Fu Haifeng. As long as you can generate some decent speed in the shuttle as you hit, it's okay if it isn't that fast. However, angle makes it really difficult to retrieve a smash because you have to catch it low or reach for the bird a little bit more, etc etc etc. Steep angle can put on that extra strain that you really need.
    Use a vertical jump whenever you can. In volleyball, when players spike the ball, they jump! If you wanna generate a viscious, sharp smash, then jump!
    If the bird is kinda low, then DON'T JUMP because well, the bird is kinda low, and scrambling a vertical jump on a low bird will make you miss it (it has happened to me :p).

    2. Placement
    Extreme sideline smashes and right-at-ya smashes are hard to defend. You can see professional players producing bad replies when a smash is hit right at them. The racquet side hip, in particular, is especially effective for body smashes. In doubles, smashing right at the middle of the two defenders helps because it is more likely to confuse them.

    3. Positioning (singles in particular)
    In singles, if your opponent fired a straight lift from a very bad position (he kinda scrambled for it, he is late returning to his base position, etc), then don't be afraid to use crosscourt smash.

    Lastly, do not feel bad even if your opponent retrieves your smash. Smash returns happen, especially when ya opponent doesn't wanna lose. Your smash will be returned once in a while. That's life. Shoulder shrug
     
    #12 dltgld, Mar 26, 2010
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2010
  13. rryz3365

    rryz3365 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2008
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Student
    Location:
    New Zealand
    Firstly, never assume that your smash is not coming back because that is probably why you are annoyed with the opponent being able to wack it across the court. You must always be ready for the return. continue to attack or move him if he wacks back your smash.

    Secondly, the Indian national player obviously spent a lot of time training to get that amount of power and accuracy in his smash. So if you want to catch up to him, you must train your footwork to keep up with his speed, fix the technique of your smash and also train the arm strength.

    Thirdly,depending on the height of your opponent, if he is a short person, ofcourse try to smash to the 2 sides so that it is hard for him to reach. However, if your opponent has a very long reach then directing the smash at his body would actually be more effective.

    Fourthly, the string tension to correct "gamepurpose", the higher the tension, the weaker the smash will be since the high tension allows more control and better "sweetspot". Low tension of the string allows less control but mroe powerful smash since there is this thing called the trampoline effect of the string.(well literally works sort of like a trampoline when it is lose) 23 pounds is actually quite lose to be honest. You should check whether your smashing technique is correct. If it is, then start training the arm strength.

    Finally, try videoing your play. The most common mistake that players make is that they do not keep their ready position the same. i.e. a big dramatic swing when going for a smash and just pull back a little for a drop. This way the opponent will easily be waiting for your smash when you do the big arc back. Since you said your smashes were accurate I cannot help but wonder why your opponent can reach and "clear it back". If a smash is directed steeply and accurately, the opponent would need to dive to get it back and it should usually be a slow block.

    LASTLY...it is always good to learn from your opponent. You can always go to that Indian national player and ask for his advice on how to smash. Afterall, he is your school team mate and would rather see the school win than lose right ;P
     
  14. Gollum

    Gollum Regular Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2003
    Messages:
    4,379
    Likes Received:
    46
    Location:
    Surrey, UK
    This theory is not universally accepted. Personally, I consider it pseudo-scientific bunkum. ;)
     
  15. ryim_

    ryim_ Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2006
    Messages:
    1,086
    Likes Received:
    1
    Occupation:
    Capital Market Research
    Location:
    Hong Kong SAR, China
    I thought this was an interesting comment :p
     
  16. chris-ccc

    chris-ccc Regular Member

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2006
    Messages:
    26,910
    Likes Received:
    11
    Occupation:
    Professional Badminton Coach & Badminton Promoter
    Location:
    Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    Direct your smash away from where your opponent's racket-head is positioned

    .
    When you smash from half court, there is very little time for your opponent to return it (probably 0.25 of a second), let alone for your opponent to see the shuttle coming.

    If your opponent can return it, it could be either:
    1. Your opponent's reflex action is super fast, or
    2. Your smash is directed to near the position of your opponent's racket-head.

    One solution: Direct your smash away from where your opponent's racket-head is positioned.

    Question: How do I know where my opponent's racket-head is positioned?
    Answer: Observe how your opponent usually places his/her racket-head when expecting you to smash.
    .
     
    #16 chris-ccc, Mar 29, 2010
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2010
  17. Gollum

    Gollum Regular Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2003
    Messages:
    4,379
    Likes Received:
    46
    Location:
    Surrey, UK
    Alternative answer: look at where it is actually placed, just before you smash. This is more accurate, but also more difficult.

    Both approaches have a place. Real information is better than guesses, but sometimes it's just too difficult to get real information and guessing is more practical.
     
  18. jut703

    jut703 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Dec 21, 2008
    Messages:
    73
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Manila, Philippines
    ^ I guess you first have to guess before you develop the ability to react quickly enough that you can glimpse right before hitting. :)

    On a side note, any tips how to add more angle to a smash? I hate having flat smashes :(

    If I'm hitting from midcourt, it's not much of an issue, I don't really have to jump to get decent angle. If it's from behind, I usually just hit the net. So I try to jump. However, my jump smash is flat about 50% of the time.

    On top of that, I guess my smash isn't strong enough. My guess is that I'm not doing weight transfer right. :(
     
  19. saifiii

    saifiii Regular Member

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2008
    Messages:
    97
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    faisalabd
    on string tension, at a higher tension, the elastic potential of string is high but so is its rigidity. so granted you can muster enough racket speed, u'll be able to generate high speeds. but if racket speed is a constant, my guess is that it might form an inverted parabola graph of tension vs shuttle speed
     
  20. hybridragon

    hybridragon Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2004
    Messages:
    187
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Student
    Location:
    La Jolla/San Lorenzo
    Angle's usually created from reaching high and optimally in front of you (approx. 1 ft) Things to also check for:
    1. Racket angle during point of contact (ie check if you're slicing)
    2. Your grip on your racket when you smash (ie are you holding the correct grip to smash at the bird without creating a slice? This relates more to power than angle, but can also help create a better angle)
    3. Your positioning relative to where the bird is (ie are you behind the bird when you smash and not under?)
    4. Timing of your swing (ie are you snapping your wrist late?)

    The strength of your smash is somewhat dependent on how well you transfer power from your body/core(abdominal area) to your arm to your racket. There's also a matter of timing and whether you are slicing (which reduces power transfer on the smash). Watching videos of Pros can be helpful at least in knowing the form to do a smash in. Instructional videos such as ones from Jonas Rasmussen(sp?) on Youtube was decent in teaching the power transfer on a smash.
     

Share This Page