Thanks for visiting us!

Badminton Central is a free community for fans of badminton! If you find anything useful here please consider registering to see more content and get involved with our great community users, it takes less than 15 seconds! Everybody is welcome here.

Click here for a FREE account!

Ideal Training Schedule

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by jchan04, Apr 6, 2008.

  1. jchan04

    jchan04 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2008
    Messages:
    683
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Mississauga, Canada
    I just turned 19 last month. And now that I am out of high school, the badminton circuit available is the mainstream open circuit.

    So I want to be competitive in badminton and join my provincial circuit. Now that its almost May, my university semester is over. I have more time than usual. So here is my suggested Training Schedule fitted for me. Ride my bike to work every morning, and have 4 hrs badminton session on Monday, Wednesday and Friday, because Tuesday and Thursday I have night school. And then on Sunday I will take up training from a local coach which is 1.5hrs.

    So basically I am getting 15 hrs of training per day. Is that too excessive? Because I know that everything has a limit and a minimum. So I guess my bike ride from home to work and back is my cardio workout. and badminton sessions are defined as club play = warmup/drills/many many games. then a coach session.

    I really want to make this work. Also at any given opportunity I will play in open tournaments.

    I know I will have replies like "jchan04 has started too late or has passed his peak" or "jchan04's training schedule is no where close like an international profession's schedule". That doesn't really matter, because I am only training for provincial circuit and 19 is a young age for Ontario badminton.

    I would like to hear replies from active badminton players about their training schedule and what areas do they mostly focus on.

    btw, my real name is Jason.

    cheers!
     
  2. Michael-Lam

    Michael-Lam Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2005
    Messages:
    148
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Student / Badminton Coach
    Location:
    Calgary
    15 hours a day is ridiculous, you'll burn out way too fast. and 19 is really late even in Canada.
     
  3. azn_123

    azn_123 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2006
    Messages:
    1,663
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Student
    Location:
    vancouver,canada
    It's not going to help if you train 15 hours a day. That's insane, you'll be mentally tired, you wouldn't be improving. Take breaks, it's going to take hard work if you want to improve, you can't rush it. By the way 19, is kind of late, but better late than nothing. Good luck!
     
  4. Bashar

    Bashar Regular Member

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2004
    Messages:
    42
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Melbourne
    I think jason meant 15 hours of training per *week* :)
    All the best to you dude. Oh, and its never too late!
     
  5. mojopin

    mojopin Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2007
    Messages:
    268
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Medical student
    Location:
    Ireland
    he ment 15 hours a week. Its four hours a day. I say go for it. you'd probably do better to have slightly less time, more regularly to help you rest and maintain the quailty of the practice , cause after a few hours, youll just be too tired to play proper strokes and proper footwork ( and youll end up spraining your ankle <-->me ). I'd say you should make sure you do alot of drills and not to waste all that time playing games, unless the people your playing against are much better than you.

    Other than that, id say go for it. Who cares if your 19. If you apply yourself and work hard you can achieve alot, and those older guys will have a nasty surprise in a year or two. Dont listen to people who cast shadow on your ambition. GO FOR IT!
     
  6. Shifty

    Shifty Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2006
    Messages:
    1,065
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Student
    Location:
    New Zealand
    just keep in mind it's not the amount of training that is important, but the quality. if you can get the desired effect in 45 minutes of hard work, why waste the other 3.25 hours?

    i think the most important thing is to have a plan on what areas you want to work on. such as, today, i'll do net shots and backhand and defense. that's not very tiring. but you can get a lot out of it. so maybe 6 hours of that wouldn't be too "excessive". but if you are working on stamina, then 30 minutes of sprints will leave you wasted. of course, it's best to combine these things, but just reflect on if this training is making you improve. if you're having trouble with footwork, you don't spend 4 hours playing doubles. nor does it mean you spend four hours on footwork drills. but you'd divide the 4 hours up and give a bigger portion to footwork.

    also, just note that low intensity exercise, such as riding a bike is not what is needed for badminton. badminton needs high intensity, short bursts and quick recovery. sprints and interval training is more suited. i'm not suggesting you don't ride a bike to work. that's good. but don't rely just on that to give you good match fitness.
     
  7. Loopy

    Loopy Regular Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2005
    Messages:
    777
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    LuckyTown
    That's what I do.
    I ride my bike to the gym on the evening.
    Then I play 2-3 hours on Friday, Saturday, Sunday and Monday.
    It is a little excessive, because you can get sluggish by the third or fourth day, but it actually helped me build stamina and endurance in a matter of 1 month. All those sessions and the bike have something to do with it.

    Second, I only play games and don't go to badminton course or have a coach.
    All the coaching videos posted here (Zhao, Xiao Jie, Chen and other top chinese coach) and all the game matches are of help.
    What really helps though is always practice the basic correct technique for the stroke and footwork. I do that at home for 15 minutes everyday, without any shuttle. At start, think of the movement all the way through.
    And then when I go play badminton, I will still try to think of the basic stroke movement and form. Because when playing, for some reason (stress maybe), you can completely change your stroke. Once you get it, the stroke will become automatic.
    It's the same thing for footwork. For example, I shadow drill the side step to the back right corner (for a right hander). But in the real game, I don't do that, and just step backwards, torso facing the net. So I forced myself to think of the correct footwork during the game, and now it becomes automatic.

    Of course, to do this, you always need to continually ask yourself if what you're doing is wrong. And you also need to know how the correct basic movements are done. Check out matches from LCW or LHI, their footwork are excellent.

    Good luck on your quest :)
     
  8. Loopy

    Loopy Regular Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2005
    Messages:
    777
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    LuckyTown
    Personally, the bike made a huge improvement for my stamina, endurance, and footwork, especially for singles when I used to paint out of breath at the first set, and just no more energy for the other sets.
    Now I am much more fitter, and can last a whole 3 sets, and still play other singles match.
    Just a note, I started biking to the gym 4 months ago. Before I used my car, and I've been playing for 5 years.
     
  9. Shifty

    Shifty Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2006
    Messages:
    1,065
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Student
    Location:
    New Zealand
    i'm not saying it's a bad thing to do. in no way. i'm saying is it is not specific to badminton. it's a great way to build up your base stamina, and endurance which is necessary for ANY sport. but jchan wants to do well. so he'll need to train stamina which is suited especially for badminton, i.e. short intense intervals. if you just keep biking, you'll eventually get to a stage where you don't seem to get tired, but you're not moving fast enough. that's simply because your body isn't conditioned to pushing itself very very hard for short times. there are people that can last for hours on court, but don't play at a very fast pace. you need to able to last for hours and hours AND be playing fast :cool::cool: and that is where interval training comes in handy. otherwise, i agree with all you've said, including your first post.
     
  10. Loopy

    Loopy Regular Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2005
    Messages:
    777
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    LuckyTown
    You're absolutely right on this. :)
    Playing fast for a long time is definitely hard work. Even the pros after a long rally need to take a breather.
    Sometimes, I try to bike as hard and fast as I can on an elevation. And that's tough. :eek:
     
  11. jchan04

    jchan04 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2008
    Messages:
    683
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Mississauga, Canada
    opps that's my mistake... just a simple typo... its 15hrs per week.
     
  12. jchan04

    jchan04 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2008
    Messages:
    683
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Mississauga, Canada
    very good encouragement from all. personally, i'm not a weight training guy that's why i turn to cardio. I believe that if I bike to my workplace (which is normally a 5 mins drive but you can imagine that it will take me 20/30 mins to get there), I will improve my endurance and that same endurance will be applied on the court as well. Primary I want to be able to manuver around the court for long periods of time at a good constant rate. I can achieve this with my endurance training plus training on footwork on the court. For example, on the court will do strides and side steps to the lengths and widths of the court. Obviously I will start at a normal pace and work my up to a fast speed.

    Besides endurance, let's go over the most important various strokes and critical movements in badminton training. Below is listed from the most important to very important. (because all available strokes are important:p)
    1. Footwork
    2. Overhead forehand clears
    3. Forehand drives
    4. Backhand drives
    5. Defensive shots in returning a smash (defensive drop, defensive clear and defensive crosscourt drive)
    6. Tight Net drops (whether it's crosscourt or just straight over)
    7. Overhead Drops
    8. Backhand drops
    9. Serves
    10. Smash
    11. Body bending overhead shots (when you arc your side for a shot as an alternative to the backhand)
    12. Net kill
    13. Back hand clears
    14. Back hand smash
    15. Jump Smash
    16. For fun, the diving defensive shot... (it's always good to be prepared for the unprepared):D where i throw my body out for the extra reach of a drop shot/wide smash/drives
    I feel that i should group these together and practice them on specific days with a partner.

    I'm open to suggestions!
     
    #12 jchan04, Apr 7, 2008
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2008
  13. jchan04

    jchan04 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2008
    Messages:
    683
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Mississauga, Canada
    take note that i'm not a beginner and i didnt just start badminton at age 19, i started when i was 14. i would say i am an intermediate level player.
     
  14. mojopin

    mojopin Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2007
    Messages:
    268
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Medical student
    Location:
    Ireland
    11.Body bending overhead shots (when you arc your side for a shot as an alternative to the backhand)

    dont practice that. Its a really terrible habit i have and im trying to stop. Its being lazy and you mess up alot more. your feet should either take you back behind it properly nice and fast, or you should block jump it or something. i dont think The terrbile stretching thing is a "correct/ideal " shot and there is always a better shot you could play. Hell even a backhand is better most of the time cause your in balance and wont get caught with a cross court whip.
     
  15. jchan04

    jchan04 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2008
    Messages:
    683
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Mississauga, Canada
    actually, my father taught me the bending arc bending shot and its proven to be very effective. it's not lazy its a more rapid and stronger approach to taking a shot. if you watch the professionals or any experience players play, most of the time when the shuttle is directed to their unfavourable, they will use this bending arc shot. if u dont me correcting you, the backhand strokes should be an alternative to this bending arc shot.

    think about it, you're quicker with this shot and you can execute a good smash with this shot. look at lin dan's videos. everytime his opposition feeds it to his right side (because he is left-handed) he does a jump smash with the bending arc technique.
     
  16. mojopin

    mojopin Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2007
    Messages:
    268
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Medical student
    Location:
    Ireland
    hmm , see when they feed it to lin dans backhand, he gets behind it and does an around the head shot. When you say "bending arc" i imagine somebody leaning way over to reach something far on the backhand without moving their legs. If however you mean moving you feet and playing a quality round the head shot, then ya your right of course :)
     
  17. jchan04

    jchan04 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2008
    Messages:
    683
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Mississauga, Canada
    :)
    i guess i have to apologize for not being specific on what an arc bending shot would be. just a cmon misconception/miscommunication.

    technically, its still an side arc bending shot... how would you describe it?
     
  18. mojopin

    mojopin Regular Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2007
    Messages:
    268
    Likes Received:
    0
    Occupation:
    Medical student
    Location:
    Ireland
    around the head shot? i dunno. i just imagined something else :) moving swiftly on...
     
  19. jchan04

    jchan04 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2008
    Messages:
    683
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Mississauga, Canada
    yeah but you arc your side to complete the shot. its arguable.
    ok... we're getting off topic, so what do you think of my schedule?
     
  20. jchan04

    jchan04 Regular Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2008
    Messages:
    683
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Mississauga, Canada
    let's go over the most important various strokes and critical movements in badminton training. Below is listed from the most important to very important. (because all available strokes are important:p)
    1. Footwork
    2. Overhead forehand clears
    3. Forehand drives
    4. Backhand drives
    5. Defensive shots in returning a smash (defensive drop, defensive clear and defensive crosscourt drive)
    6. Tight Net drops (whether it's crosscourt or just straight over)
    7. Overhead Drops
    8. Backhand drops
    9. Serves
    10. Smash
    11. Body bending overhead shots (when you arc your side for a shot as an alternative to the backhand)
    12. Net kill
    13. Back hand clears
    14. Back hand smash
    15. Jump Smash
    16. For fun, the diving defensive shot... (it's always good to be prepared for the unprepared):D where i throw my body out for the extra reach of a drop shot/wide smash/drives
    I feel that i should group these together and practice them on specific days with a partner.

    I'm open to suggestions!
     

Share This Page