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India Badminton

Discussion in 'India Professional Players' started by limsy, Dec 13, 2009.

  1. rogerv2

    rogerv2 Regular Member

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    She should avoid going to 3 sets unless she is mentally and physically strong. She is neither from my observations so far. Saina does have this covered at times but she is very inconsistent especially with so called weaker opponents.

    I also don't believe in giving up a set unless your endurance and stamina is weak. Otherwise you would leave your opponent at a mental high which is very dangerous.
     
  2. scorpion1

    scorpion1 Regular Member

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    I am not telling it always.. P.C.Thulasi is a rally player. Might have thought to save energy to make a comeback in the rubber !!!. Possibilities are there right.. Anyhow, According to me, she is full of potential.. She need to utilise it when it is needed. In times like tense moments, she seems to lose her nerves and makes many unforced errors. Eradicating the tension to attain the goal is the priority for her now.. :)
     
  3. scorpion1

    scorpion1 Regular Member

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    [h=1]Chennai to host Super Series event[/h]
    http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-sports/chennai-to-host-super-series-event/article4367578.ece

    EXCERPTS:

    Chennai will play host to a ‘Super Series’ major international badminton event around April or May next year.
    The Tamil Nadu government recently sanctioned Rs. one crore, subsequently raised to Rs. three crore, towards prize money for the event.


    According to Ashok Bajaj, General Secretary, Tamil Nadu Badminton Association, the encouragement for bidding such a big event, currently staged in New Delhi, has come from the Government’s initiative.


    He said there could be no other venue other than the Nehru Indoor stadium and the Government was helping in refurbishing the stadium by sanctioning Rs. 10 crore.


    “The flooring have been changed as also the lighting. What remains are the air-conditioning system and the water tanks,” he said.Mr. Bajaj said he had also informed the Government of the need for at least three practice courts since this was mandatory for hosting any top-ranking international tournament.


    “We are hoping that all this will be looked into and Chennai will be ready to witness the best of world talent in action,” he said.


    Once the stadium is ready, more international tournaments could be planned. He mentioned in connection with the fact that the Association was prepared to hold a CM Trophy event and to even accept the offer of hosting the World Cup scheduled for next year.


    Mr. Bajaj said there were plans to get some of the legends in the sport too to patronise the proposed Super Series event. “There is every chance that Lin Dan, the top Chinese player, will visit Chennai. He has expressed interest,” he said.

    Nice move taken by Chief Minister J. Jayalalitha. If Chennai got selected to host the tournament, i would be the most happiest man in the world..:)
     
  4. scorpion1

    scorpion1 Regular Member

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    [h=1]BAI mulls sending Prajakta to Europe[/h]
    http://www.sportskeeda.com/2013/01/31/bai-mulls-sending-prajakta-to-europe/

    EXCERPTS:

    The Badminton Association of India (BAI) is mulling whether Mumbai’s Prajakta Sawant could be part of the India squad to Europe for the German Open and the All England Badminton Championships in February-March. BAI has in principle agreed to clear her name for the European circuit but as things stand, she may not “merit selection” on her ranking to be part of the national squad. That means she will have to fend for herself and that will be a heavy financial burden on her.
    BAI secretary general Vijai Sinha said Sawant’s case is under consideration and a decision will be taken in a day or two.

    “We have not decided on the issue yet, we will do so in the next couple of days,” Sinha told IANS from Lucknow.

    The BAI rethink follows the Bombay High Court ruling Wednesday that it should consider sending Sawant for the two major European tournaments.

    The court ruling came following Sawant’s plea in November that national coach Pullela Gopichand was “mentally harassing” her by keeping her out of the national training camps.

    “My entry is confirmed for both the tournaments, but I am the only one not listed in the national squad. BAI told me that they are considering whether I could be part of the national team and will get back to me in a couple of days. If I am not part of the official squad there is little time for me to find a sponsor as it is going to be an expensive trip,” Sawant told IANS from Bangalore, where she is playing in an All India Senior Ranking Tournament.

    Gopichand had recently stated that the matter should be laid to rest in the interest of the sport in the country.

    Asked if she was willing to drop the charges against Gopichand in the interest of the game, the former national women’s and mixed doubles champion said she can’t comment on the subject as she needs to discuss the matter with her lawyer.

    “We have not decided on that. I need to discuss with my lawyer on dropping the charges,” said the 20-year-old.
    Sawant said if she goes to Europe then she will partner Jwala Gutta, who showed support and willingness to play with the Mumbai girl.

    JWALA/PRAJAKTHA , both of them need to concentrate in the game hereafter. Past is past. Concentration in the training will definitely pave way in their career for good. They have to cross the qualifiers in both the tournaments. Hence, it will be a huge hurdle in front of them. But i hope, they will cross it and enter the main draw and do better in these two tournaments..All the very best for both of you.:)
     
  5. cobalt

    cobalt Moderator

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    Pranaav begins 2013 on a winning note


    Feb 4, 2013
    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/...13-on-a-winning-note/articleshow/18327532.cms

    Excerpts:

    LUDHIANA: Adding another feather to his cap, city-based shuttler Pranaav Jerry Chopra won the mixed doubles title at the ONGC All India ranking tournament, playing with Maneesha, at Bangalore.

    They defeated number 1 ranking missed double pair of the country Arun Vishnu and Aparna Balan in grueling three sets that ended at 21-15, 18-21 and 22-20. Despite a weak link in Maneesha, who is 17 and was playing her first senior category match, the pair could hold their nerves until they clinched the finals.

    Praanav, 20, and Maneesha have been partnering for the mixed doubles since December and are training at badminton ace Pullela Gopichand's academy.

    ...Pranaav says he is thankful to his employers ONGC for helping him shape his international career, apart from the coaches and family, who are his pillars of strength.

    ..."ONGC had provided the much needed financial support when I had a knee injury last year and covered my foreign tours as well. This relieves a player from a lot of stress and lets him or her concentrate more on the game," adds Pranaav.
     
  6. cobalt

    cobalt Moderator

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    Sordid drama continues...

    ..
    HC asks state to pay for Prajakta's overseas trip

    By Rosy Sequeira, TNN | Feb 2, 2013
    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/...jaktas-overseas-trip/articleshow/18298184.cms

    Excerpts:

    MUMBAI: In India the popular perception is that more funds are spent on sports officials than players, observed Bombay high court on Wednesday after the Badminton Association of India (BAI) declined to bear the expenses of player Prajakta Sawant for the forthcoming championships in Germany and England pleading policy compulsions.

    The court has directed the Maharashtra government to consider funding her saying "she needs to be encouraged being a resident of Mumbai."

    A division bench of Chief Justice Mohit Shah and Justice Anoop Mohta were informed by BAI's advocate Girish Godbole that since she is not part of the Indian team her expenses cannot be borne by it.

    "We have a policy. If we do it for it her it shall set a precedent. Her entry was sent after the court directed it," he said, adding that eight other players attending the championships are paying their own expenses. Sawant's advocate Piyush Shah said these players are without rankings and questioned the basis on which they are being sent.
     
  7. scorpion1

    scorpion1 Regular Member

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    Make domestic events open to foreign players: Vimal Kumar


    http://www.sportskeeda.com/2013/02/14/make-domestic-events-open-to-foreign-players-vimal-kumar/

    EXCERPTS:

    Vimal Kumar, former world No.17 and chief coach of the Indian team, has always been a progressive voice in Indian badminton. As chief coach, he had submitted an elaborate ‘LTDP’ – Long Term Development Programme — to the Badminton Association of India which was unfortunately ignored. If the LTDP had been implemented, Indian badminton would have been far ahead of where it is today. In this conversation, Vimal elaborates on some of his ideas to revive the domestic circuit, which has been stifled due to a lack of innovative ideas in the country:
    Make Indian tournaments open to foreigners:


    Indian tournaments should be open to everybody. Let the tournaments be open, except the national championships. If I’m having a Rs 2 lakh tournament in West Bengal, I might get entries from Bangladesh. The profile of the tournament will get better. Don’t sit on technicalities. It doesn’t matter if it’s not recognised as an international tournament. We have to welcome foreign players – that will help our players as well.

    Stop wasting time on frivolous issues:


    The major detriment is the conditions put in the name of BWF rules. Like, if you’re playing an open tournament, you are not allowed to wear a district T-shirt; the quarterfinals onwards, T-shirts have to match with shorts, etc. Half the time, these officials waste time on irrelevant issues. It’s absolutely ridiculous. Umpires are petrified because of a few officials. Instead of conducting matches, they are worried about what’s written on the T-shirts, or the size of the logo, so players are pasting tape on their T-shirts, which looks bad.

    Change the structure of inter-state event:


    (The inter-state event has become lop-sided ever since all the various petroleum companies, which employ most of the international players, have started fielding a unified team.)
    Make the nationals interesting. The inter-state has become a farce. Only the winner of the inter-unit matches should represent the petroleum sector at the inter-state event. They should not field a unified team.
    Elite players must play domestic events:


    This has been going on for the last five-six years. The number of tournaments has dropped. Our emphasis is only on elite players. We are neglecting the next line of players. Every tournament organiser wants the best players in the country, but that’s not possible because of the hectic international schedule. The top players should compulsorily play in one or two domestic tournaments.
    Over the last five-six years, the Sports Ministry has given tremendous support, so players have the responsibility to give back to the sport. They cannot say they cannot play in domestic events. The top players should play at least two tournaments in the country. The mentality of the player is to expect everything to be given to them. Professionalism means you should spend your own money on your training requirements, rather than expect the state or your sponsor to do everything for you.
    Reduce the minimum prize money required for tournaments:


    Now, the minimum is Rs 5 lakh prize money, and the total money required to hold a tournament is around Rs 10 lakh. The cost of the officials has gone up. Organisers are being burdened. They are putting in Rs 10 lakh, but what are they getting back? So they need to be given options. Keep the higher prize money tournaments, but keep even Rs 1 lakh prize money tournaments. The second line of players don’t get any events to play. They are spending money to go for international tournaments. Instead of burdening organisers, allow the national circuit to have different categories of prize money tournaments. Let even the third line of players play. Let there be 20-30 tournaments.

    Make the draws transparent:


    The entries close 21 days before a tournament. The M (main draw) and Q (qualifying) lists are put out one week before. But why aren’t the draws announced immediately? The draws are announced only at the last minute, and there are all kinds of changes that happen. Now, even on the first day of the tournament, the draw is likely to change. We don’t even know where the draws are done. There is no system. We should know who’s doing it. Even at the nationals, the draw wasn’t out on time. The referee doesn’t have a clue. He’s not informed of anything.

    Crack down on overage menace:


    I’d say 50-60 percent of junior players are overage. Introduce bone tests for the international team. If junior players are caught, prevent them from playing age-category events. If the culprit is in the under-19 category, stop them from playing for two years. Badminton is the only sport that’s not implementing it.

    Enable both scoring formats:


    I always say the 80s was the golden era of badminton. We should have both scoring formats. The quality of the game has gone down because of the scoring format; everybody is scared of opening up their game and exploring the length and width of the court. They all want to play fast and safe, and bang down the shuttle if it is hit up.

    EXCELLENT IDEAS. But got rejected?? !!! :confused:. If somebody comes up with some ideas, even without analysing the solution and its impacts, blocking from its scratch is totally blind thing for the welfare of it(any event). I am totally pissed off.

    I was really wondered by the way he asked about draws of the tournaments. Even i was thinking the same for long time. Make it transparent. This should be the prime motto of an excellent governance. I believe that those few drawbacks in the books of BWF can be cured with appropriate medicine in the near future and make all of us happy.:)




     
  8. chris-ccc

    chris-ccc Regular Member

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  9. rogerv2

    rogerv2 Regular Member

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    I can agree with most of the suggestions except
    1) Crack down on overage menace:
    Bone testing? I am sure everyone has an ID, right?
    If 50 - 60% are overage something is fundamentally wrong with the ID verification.
    How do they do bone testing? Bone samples or by external non intrusive methods?

    2)
    Enable both scoring formats:
    So who decides which one to use? Toss of coin?
    Players are already complaining of too many tournaments. If 15 points system are rolled out again, we are going to have super long long matches and probably more injuries.

     
    #289 rogerv2, Feb 19, 2013
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2013
  10. rogerv2

    rogerv2 Regular Member

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    Removed duplicate post
     
    #290 rogerv2, Feb 19, 2013
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2013
  11. depleter

    depleter Regular Member

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    Nope ... Not everyone in India has an ID and even the people having them contains manipulated information.This is the main problem if you have some 1.3 billion people. But however the GOVT have introduced ID system last year. But I don't think the overage problem would be eradicated with it as people change their birthdates to a year or two less.
     
  12. rogerv2

    rogerv2 Regular Member

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    Ok. However is this a big problem in terms of developing badminton talents?
    So it will be pitting juniors with more matured individuals and most likely the juniors might lose out on some titles.

    Looking at it positively, if a real junior wins this title then they must be really good for their age.
    If the winner is really good they will progress far else how long can they keep up this con job? +- 2 year? So it is not really a big problem.

    Bone testing is not really practical in terms of cost for the cash strapped organisers.
     
  13. rogerv2

    rogerv2 Regular Member

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    I would like to know how China handles ID related issues as they have almost the same population as India.
    [TABLE="class: wikitable sortable"]
    [TR]
    [TH]Rank[/TH]
    [TH]Country (or dependent territory)[/TH]
    [TH]Population[/TH]
    [TH]Date[/TH]
    [TH]% of world
    population[/TH]
    [TH]Source[/TH]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD]1[/TD]
    [TD="align: left"][​IMG] China[SUP][7][/SUP][/TD]
    [TD]1,354,040,000[/TD]
    [TD]December 31, 2012[/TD]
    [TD]19.16%[/TD]
    [TD="align: left"]Official estimate[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [TR]
    [TD]2[/TD]
    [TD="align: left"][​IMG] India[/TD]
    [TD]1,210,193,422[/TD]
    [TD]March 1, 2011[/TD]
    [TD]17.12%[/TD]
    [TD="align: left"]2011 census[/TD]
    [/TR]
    [/TABLE]
     
    #293 rogerv2, Feb 19, 2013
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2013
  14. depleter

    depleter Regular Member

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    hehehe..:P
    Hmmm... Yupp bone testing is not practical especially in badminton as it's resources are not as huge as other sports. I was just pointing out a natural problem of overage in India.
     
  15. depleter

    depleter Regular Member

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    Looks like you can find those details in WIKI.
    China too have a personal identification system...but that's only compulsory for ages above 16.
    So, the manipulation can still take place I think.
    If you want the latest Indian system ..
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unique_Identification_Authority_of_India
     
  16. rogerv2

    rogerv2 Regular Member

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    Yeah, too lazy to read all the way down. Thanks for the info.

    BTW, does anybody know how to get rid of "someone quoted you email notification".
    It is pretty much useless as it does not link to the actual thread.
    Previously I get notification for any reply to the thread which is perfect.
    Dont know why suddenly this quoted email started popping up instead.
     
  17. cobalt

    cobalt Moderator

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    Try:
    Settings -> General Settings -> Default thread subscription mode -> Through Control Panel only.

    Hope it works! :)
     
  18. scorpion1

    scorpion1 Regular Member

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    [h=1]"Changes in scoring system has worked well for Indians" - Uday Pawar Interview[/h]

    http://www.sportskeeda.com/2013/02/...worked-well-for-indians-uday-pawar-interview/

    EXCERPTS:

    Former international shuttler Uday Pawar has served Indian badminton with distinction in both singles and doubles. A former national coach, he presently runs the Uday Pawar Badminton Academy in Mumbai. His son Anand Pawar is a top Indian shuttler, while his wife Sujata is also a former international shuttler. Uday talks about his playing days, the health of Indian badminton and much more in an exclusive interview to Sportskeeda

    Tell us a bit about your early days in badminton – how did you take up the sport?


    I was born and brought up in Lonavala. I liked to play all sports at a young age and was the captain of my Don Bosco school team in sports like badminton, cricket and table tennis. My late father P.D.Pawar, was a cricketer, who played for the Combined Universities and was a sports lover, who used to organise state-level tournaments in Lonavala every year. When I was about 10 years old, I won a badminton tournament in Lonavala defeating a good player from Mumbai and since then, badminton became my biggest passion.


    Can you enlighten us on how you started off on the domestic circuit at various age levels?


    Well, during those days, there was only under-18 category in the junior level. I was fortunate that at the age of 13, I was playing outside Lonavala for the first time and fared well and was selected to represent Pune district and for Maharashtra. I also won my first national crown in junior doubles with Sanjay Sharma the same year. I later went on to win 3 more junior national doubles titles with my good friend Madhur Bezbora and the mixed doubles title when the event was first introduced in the juniors, with Manik Paranjpe. In the junior singles, I was not so successful as I lost two national finals to Syed Modi.

    Do you have any fond memories of your first senior nationals?


    I still remember I beat four seeded players and reached the finals of my first senior nationals in 1976, where I lost to Prakash Padukone in a close match. In fact, those days both the junior and senior nationals were held simultaneously; there is an interesting statistic – Prakash Padukone is the only player from India to win both the titles in the same year. Ami Ghia Shah was the winner in the Seniors and finalist in the Junior; interestingly, my wife Sujata was the junior champion and runners-up in the Seniors (she and Ami won one title each and had reached the finals in both events in the same year). I have the dubious distinction of losing both the finals in the same year – juniors to Syed Modi and the seniors to Prakash Padukone.

    Can you tell us a bit about your first international tournament?


    After reaching the finals in my first senior nationals at the age of 17 at Jallandhar in 1976, I was selected to represent India in the first-ever World Championship held in Sweden (Malmo). I lost in the first round in three games, but the sheer experience of representing the country in such a prestigious event was an an honour and a big boost for my badminton career.

    What are your biggest wins in singles and doubles?


    I was good in both singles and doubles – I won several national doubles titles and was the singles runners-up twice – lost to Prakash Padukone and then Syed Modi. In hindsight, I feel that I should have perhaps concentrated on one of the two events as playing in two events put me at a distinct disadvantage against players like Prakash and Modi, who played only singles. My workload used to be double and that means I was never fresh by the time I reached the finals. I defeated Modi twice, but could never beat Prakash who was too good, but I consider myself lucky to have partnered Prakash in doubles during Thomas Cup and other team events. My advice to youngsters is to play both singles and doubles till they are 17-18 years old, but then specialize in one of the two events.
    We won many laurels for the country at the Asian Games and the Commonwealth Games. I learnt a lot of my badminton from Prakash when we partnered each other in doubles and I consider him as one of the most intelligent and clever players produced by India. In fact, we all (his contemporaries) still call him “BOSS” with respect and affection!
    How has badminton changed over the years?


    Badminton has changed a lot over the years because of better equipments, scientific training/coaching and also because of the change in the scoring system. The game has become faster and more aggressive, now even coaching is allowed between points, which have made the role of a coach more vital. Earlier, a player had to use his own brains to outwit an opponent, but today, a coach can do the thinking for the player, which is not such a good thing as it has robbed the game of its natural flair.

    Which has been your most memorable international match and why?


    The deciding match that me and Prakash won in doubles at the 1986 Seoul Olympics beating world no. 5 Japanese pair of Matsura & Matsuno to win the bronze medal. India qualifying for the Thomas Cup finals in 1978 & 1989 are other high points of my playing career. In singles, I beat players like Icuk Sugiarto who became the world champion in 1983. I also defeated Kevin Jolly, who was the European champion – these wins are really special for me.
    [​IMG]

    How close are Indian shuttlers in terms of matching the mighty Chinese in all departments of the game?


    Look, the change in the scoring format about five years ago has augured well for the India players – the earlier system favoured players with only superior fitness. This format is good for the Indian players as it needs good skills and temperament, which we are good at. There are more breaks in the game, which allow a player to recover and start afresh. One does not have to be as fit as the Chinese or Indonesians, but even if one attains about 80-85% of their fitness, it is enough as we have better skills and temperament.

    How do you look at the current health of Indian badminton?


    Players like Saina Nehwal and Parupalli Kashyap have broken into the top 5 and 10 respectively and now it’s a question of maintaining their fitness and grabbing the opportunities that come their way. They are an inspiration to all the aspiring youngsters from India, who should go all out without any fear or doubt. Their attitude should be – if Saina and Kashyap can do it, so can we.

    Tell us a bit about your badminton academy –how did it come up and how is it shaping up?


    I was the coach of the senior national team for seven years and our team fared very well during those years, winning medals at the Commonwealth Games as well as qualifying for the Thomas Cup final rounds twice. But, then staying away from the family without getting paid for my services was tough on me. I got the inspiration to start an academy from my coach Mr. P. Pramanik, and formally started it 12 years ago, but even before that I was coaching privately and had produced players like Manjusha Pawangadkar, Sachin Ratti, Vincent Lobo and Sushant Chippalkatti – players who became national champions and went on to win international laurels as well. The unique point about my academy is that all the players have started playing as beginners under my guidance and have gone on to win national titles and represent the country.
    Players like my son Anand, Tanvi Lad, Harshil Dani and others have won national titles, beating players from all over the country. Our academy, which is being run in association with a lot of encouragement from Goregaon Sports Club comprises about 25 players of various age groups. We do not have a sponsor now or in all these years, but I have not lost hope. Our efforts are there to be seen in the form of results and we hope these talented youngsters do get support and better facilities that they deserve.
    How do you assess Anand Pawar’s performance on the international stage –what’s more you want him to achieve?


    Anand was doing very well 2-3 years ago, but he had a major setback in 2009 when he sustained a back injury in his spine. He has won 7 international tournaments over the years, even came very close to beating top-10 player like Sony Dwi Kuncero, played 3 games with the great Lee Chong Wei, but needs to be more consistent and mentally strong. Indian players have traditionally done well at an age later than most Chinese or Indonesians, so the next few years are important for Anand. He has the potential to be a top-10 player and I, as his father and coach along with my wife Sujata, are doing our best to help him. But the journey to the top is his and we pray that he achieves the goals that he has set for himself.

     
  19. scorpion1

    scorpion1 Regular Member

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    India's Saili Rane won the WS title in Uganda International tournament. And india's Dey Subhankar ended runner up.

    http://www.globaltimes.cn/NEWS/tabid/99/ID/763891/763891.aspx

    EXCERPTS:

    Sri Lanka's Dinuka Karunaratre and Rane Saili from India are the 2013 Uganda International Badminton Open Championships winners of the men's and women's singles respectively.

    The tournament that climaxed on Sunday at the MTN Arena, Lugogo saw Dinuka, brother to last year's winner Niluka beat India's Dey Subhankar 21-16, 21-17 in a game that lasted 34 minutes. Subhankar took the lead in the two games, but Dinuka's good game reading and clever net play was enough to win him the title.


    "This is a great win because we are making sure this title goes to Sri Lanka again after my brother won it last year. I have liked the tournament because it has been very competitive and beating an Indian in the tournament is even so sweet because they are a big badminton playing nation in Asia," a happy Karunaratre told Xinhua News after the tough game.


    To reach the final, Subhankar beat Italy's Daniel Messersi, while Karunaratre humbled another Italian player Giovanni Greco.


    In the women's final Saili saw off Egypt's Hosny Hadia 21-12, 21-12 in a one sided final. Hadia, Africa's second best player said she faced a strong player, but she was happy to reach the final and get world ranking points.


    The pair of Greco and Messersi got a consolation win in the men's doubles after seeing off the Egyptian pair of El Sayad and Ahmed Kashkal 21-18, 21-18.


    Africa's best female player Gabriel Grace from Nigeria combined well with Aboobakar Shama (Mauritius) to stop the Ugandan pair of Shamim Bangi and Magareat Nankabirwa in the women's doubles final 21-13, 18-21, 21-12 in a game that kept the local home supporters on their toes.

    "We are happy to reach the final although we did not win," said Bangi who also reached the semis of the women's singles.

    It was an all Egyptian final in the mixed doubles when El Sayad and Ashraf Nadine beat Hosny Nadia and Ahmed Kashkal 14-21, 21-15, 21-19.

    The tournament sanctioned by the Badminton World Federation (BWF) attracted players from Nigeria, Germany, Hungary, Scotland, Italy, India, Mauritius, Egypt, Kenya and hosts Uganda.
     
  20. scorpion1

    scorpion1 Regular Member

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    [h=1]Badminton coaching clinic for coaches[/h]http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/sports/more-sports/badminton/Badminton-coaching-clinic-for-coaches/articleshow/18676406.cms

    EXCERPTS:

    GoSports Foundation will organize a coaching clinic for coaches at the Prakash Padukone Badminton Academy from February 28 to March 2 with Indonesian coach Yusuf Jauhari - the brother of noted trainer Atik - taking charge.

    The 56-year-old Yusuf, who has over three decades of experience in training junior talent, has been the head coach of a national junior training camp in Jakarta for more than six years.

    The coaches clinic will be held between 10 am and 1pm. GoSports will hold a similar camp at the Pullela Gopichand Academy in Hyderabad in the last week of March. Contact: foundation@gosports.in
     

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