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Intensive Training

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by G-nob, Jan 15, 2008.

  1. G-nob

    G-nob Regular Member

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    Help me Guys..

    I am contemplating on the idea of letting my 12 yr. old daughter attend a badminton training program in Indonesia for 60 days. She's been playing for almost two years, and attending a program twice a week. Let me know your pros and cons.
     
  2. jug8man

    jug8man Regular Member

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    Will there be a guardian who you know well enough to accompany her?

    2 day training to full time training is a big jump. More so for a 12 year old girl still in the growing stage.

    If you think she is mentally matured enough to take care of herself and adjust well to a sudden change of environment (e.g. homesick, not comfartable with living condition, different kind of food & etc.)... then it should be ok.

    Badminton level wise, she may or may not be overwhelmed by the standard difference. This might cause her to be left behind in terms of training she can participate in. Regardless tho, if you have found a reliable set up to provide necessary attention for your daughter during this duration, It should be ok.
     
  3. extremenanopowe

    extremenanopowe Regular Member

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    She definitely will need support there. Definitely will improve her game since there are so many good players there.
     
  4. G-nob

    G-nob Regular Member

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    Let me add, besides the two day training, She's doing an off-court training like skipping rope, push-up, and sit-ups every other day.
     
  5. lsh-07

    lsh-07 Regular Member

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    Well, if she feels comfortable with the idea and wants to do it, I'd say go ahead cuz' it sounds like a great oportunity (to me anyways).
     
  6. coachgary

    coachgary Regular Member

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    Remember that the majority of juniors that play sport regularly are naturally fit. In my opinion more time should be spent on technique quality, of movement, and speed and power, groove all the shots.
     
  7. uncle_peanuts

    uncle_peanuts Regular Member

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    12 is pretty young to go somewhere by yourself. if she has some sort of guardian then it helps a lot.

    training wise, i think it'll be much more intense compared to what she is use to now. indonesia is a place filled with lots of talented youngsters, so she had better be prepared to work hard in order to move ahead.

    coachgary: when i went to chinese training centre for kids aged 9-13 co-ed, 95% of all training was footwork and speed related. there were no technique based training where the coach would teach you how to refine a shot other than the occasional comment such as "hit it earlier". from what i can recall, there was only 1 drill that focused on a shot technique and it was related to the smash.
     
    #7 uncle_peanuts, Jan 17, 2008
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2008
  8. coachgary

    coachgary Regular Member

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    I wish our club juniors would spend 70% of my precious 2 hours per week doing footwork drills! lol.

    For a minority sport we cannot afford to have anyone dropout because they're bored of doing footwork drills and movement patterns. The key to our success as a Junior Club is fun, they learn to enjoy and love the game, it becomes a sport for life, that they're hooked into. We strike a balance between play,training and competition.
     
  9. martin8768

    martin8768 New Member

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    haha im so crazy i force myself to do footwork drills for a couple hours a day even if i have no hitting partner i will go to the gym and do footwork but i would never force anyone else to do it as a coach, some people arnt crazy enough. or get bored:p
     
  10. jug8man

    jug8man Regular Member

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    I suggest you decide before her going what kind of training you do not want to take part in. You might want to draw a clear line to the coaches over there that she won't participate in the weight training sessions like the Indonesian kids.
     
  11. mojopin

    mojopin Regular Member

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    Does she want to go?
    I'd say if its safe and happy to go then do it. You can always take her home if she doesnt like it. Safety first.
     
  12. bhtan

    bhtan Regular Member

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    Why not get a local coach to drill her two hours everyday for a week ?

    She need to know the price to pay for the massive skill improvement . Let her have a mental preparation and feel the physically training .

    Who knows ... she's a tough dog like wong mew choo.
     
  13. G-nob

    G-nob Regular Member

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    Gentlemen,

    Im getting a lot of good opinions here. Thanks a lot to all of you.
     
  14. KazeCloud

    KazeCloud Regular Member

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    Work her very hard, but let her have the proper time to recover. 12 years old isn't too young to train hard. I wished I started younger. =P
     
  15. westwood_13

    westwood_13 Regular Member

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    Okay, sorry, but no. No. No. No.

    The first time I threw up from overtraining, I was 11. It began a pattern which has resulted in me being chronically injured from being psychologically addicted to overtraining, not to mention being an over-achiever, a perfectionist, and pretty screwed up in general.

    Here are a bunch of reasons for no:

    1) At 12 she isn't even fully developed enough for all the strength training to be beneficial.
    2) What she's told there will probably contradict what her coach at home says which will ultimately confuse her since at her age she wont be able to decide for herself which is best and well end up with a poorly-functioning hybrid of technique.
    3) She wont really remember the experience as she gets older. I certainly remember diddly-squat from when I was 12.
    4) It's expensive.
    5) If no one is going with her, she will get incredibly homesick, especially if she hasnt' been away for that long before.
    6) The jump from twice a week two eight hours a day is huge.
    7) You're depriving her of key contact with her parents and peers for sixty days. That's a really, really, really, really long time. Especially right before teenage-hood... this decision could completely effect your relationship with your daughter through all the rocky teenage years. If you send her and she doesn't enjoy it, she will resent you for a decade, minimum.
    8) Since she doesn't train that frequently now, it is almost guaranteed she will be injured quite quickly due to the sudden increase. So she probably wouldn't be able to participate as much as you'd like.
    9) Sending her to a camp like that will not fulfill her (or your) dreams of her becoming a pro.

    I can think of a dozen other reasons but my fingers are tiring.

    Please don't send your daughter.
     
  16. jgao_net

    jgao_net Regular Member

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    hmm... i can kind of sense your canadian bias. there are certain things that are required to become a good badminton player. but in the end, it's up to parent.
    btw, i dont think they will be doing strength training at 12
     
  17. Athelete1234

    Athelete1234 Regular Member

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    The key point here is: is she ready for somethign like this? Is she willing to put in this time and effort for the sport? Is she the one that wants to do this? If you want her to go for it, but she's not 100% for this camp, dont' do it. If she's 100% willing, and wants to go, dont' try to stop her.
     
  18. westwood_13

    westwood_13 Regular Member

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    True. We Canadian's are very biased and overprotective when it comes to children. It also comes from different values and ethical bases.

    For example, in China it is commonplace to identify young athletes, well before puberty, and channel them to excel at a certain sport. From our perspective, the fun and free will is largely removed from the activity. However, they are taught great discipline and drive to work hard and excel. Does this produces incredible champions? Yes, it does.

    The difference is that in the Asian world the sacrifice is justified by the ends, and in Canada it is generally not considered that way. Neither is right nor wrong and I can see good arguments for both sides. I'm not 100% sure where I fall in regard to this, either, although my bias obviously puts me on the side where I don't so much improve.
     
  19. jug8man

    jug8man Regular Member

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    The West have strange perception of badminton summer camps. They like to organize 2 weeks visit to maybe China, Denmark or somewhere else. Then they come in a really large group with a whole range of badminton level among them.

    The training gets 'diluted' and often sidetracked by 'sight seeing programs'.

    Also, lots of emphasize seem to be placed on having a 'badminton personality' show up.. give some words of encouragement and maybe lecture about badminton basics.

    Overall the training camp becomes more like a badminton 'clinic'.

    Serious badminton players often self arrange these 'trips' in small / close tight groups looking for 'no-nonsense' & 'no-frills' training centres. Mostly so they do not get distracted from the main objective... which is : a full time training experience in a (presumably) more serious & conducive training environment.

    Sure they are unlikely to return home after a month as the next national champion, but to them... it helps them get on the right path and give them a better understanding of what it takes to reach their badminton goals. It helps them measure their capacity and decide their own future.

    This 2 month training in Indonesia no doubt is a no-nonsense arrangement. Your daughter is quite young but we don't know your child. She may be all ready physically, mentally and discipline so since you know her better the choice and responsibility for this decision is all your own.

    Just remember not to have to high expectations of results. Also, even after 2 month training... full benefits only come maybe a month later when more of the 'new stuff' she learns finally sinks into full practice.

    BTW. The weight training with little kids in indonesia is no joke.
     
  20. pezai

    pezai Regular Member

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    it honestly comes down to 2 things. first, is ur child willing to do this, is there even the slightest chance that she's not willing to? second, make sure itz safe there cause ur child is only 12 years old, and ur child is already attending a program twice a week, so why bother make her go through all this 60 day stuff? she might not even like badminton by the time she turns 15, so talk to your child and see what she really wants
     

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