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Intercepting flat lifts in singles!

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by Rob3rt, Jan 21, 2013.

  1. Rob3rt

    Rob3rt Regular Member

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    Hi guys,
    how to get better at intercepting flat lifts/drives after playing a low (backhand) serve in singles? I can get the "slower" ones, but if the flat lift is played very fast I can't seem to hit the shuttlecock in front of my body.
    Is it even possible to always intercept them at the middle of the court? If so, what's the correct footwork for that?

    Thanks
    Rob3rt
     
  2. renbo

    renbo Regular Member

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    It is a difficult shot! But an important one! My take at it is to jump backward. You do one step toward the back corner and jump in that direction. If the lift is flat enough, you can jump directly from the base position, without making a first step.Beside, when you serve don't forget to check your opponent's position. If he is to close to the service line, and is thus well positioned for a fast lift on your low serve, you give him a high serve to the back. After being late on such serves for some time, your opponent won't be so aggressive on your low serve.One last thing: when you give a low serve, you have to anticipate the fast lift, because it is the classical low-serve reception shot. Be prepared!
     
  3. LD rules!

    LD rules! Regular Member

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    By flat lift, I presume you mean like almost a drive?

    My advice would be to possibly move your service position back slightly. The point of singles is to eliminate corners that your opponent will play to, if he is aggressive and likes to play flat to the backhand, then you know mostly where the shuttles going to end up and you can eliminate forehand net, and minimise forehand lift . Therefore you leave yourself focused on backhand corner, and can plan your shot choice from there...
     
  4. Rob3rt

    Rob3rt Regular Member

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    Thanks, I will try to move my serve position back a little - as I don't have much problems getting drops back - and will take a step to the side or a jump if its very fast.
     
  5. lordrogue

    lordrogue Regular Member

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    I also have a problem with this, especially to my backhand side. I'm quite tall so if I jump in that direction the shuttle is too low for me to hit around the head. And you can't jump backhand, that'd be awkward. The only solution for me seems to be to take it really late backhand and try to get a dropshot off but that leaves you with a really big disadvantage.
     
  6. Rob3rt

    Rob3rt Regular Member

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    I noticed that most people can play better flat lifts with backhand; mostly when I do a low serve to their forehand they don't play that shot.
    I also try to serve close to the "T" as close as possible to limit the possible angles! ;)
     
  7. 96382

    96382 Regular Member

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    the correct standing and timing is most important. first step as always with both legs. for most fast interceptions youll need to jump with both feet at once. remember to have your racket up and ready, racket moving towards shuttle (at least slightly) in front of you.

    the most important factor besides that is your fitness. you need strong reactive muscles in terms of lateral movements and quick feet.
     
  8. quixilver

    quixilver Regular Member

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    +1 for this...
    I normally serve as close as possible to the center line. For example, while serving on the right side of the court, if I serve the shuttle low towards the opponent's forehand, he/she will have the opportunity to receive the serve by swiftly pushing the shuttle straight to my backhand side and that will be too far for me to reach.
    By serving towards the center line, he/she has to push the shuttle from his/her center position towards my backhand baseline and it will be easier for me to reach the shuttle faster to intercept the return or even possibly backhand-smash it from the mid-court if I manage to turn my body fast enough.

    Just my 0.02...
     
  9. Rob3rt

    Rob3rt Regular Member

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    Yeah, but if I see my opponent already anticipating that shot I try to vary my serves and do a shot towards the forehand or backhand - or even a flick serve, maybe I will catch him by surprise.
     

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