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Is this Shin Splint / Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome (MTSS)?

Discussion in 'Injuries' started by anirban, Oct 18, 2009.

  1. anirban

    anirban Regular Member

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    Hi all!

    In these days I am practicing footwork rigorously to achieve better and faster footwork. This practice includes long step running, covering the entire court from the middle in two and half steps and doing forward steps on the balls of the front parts of the feet. Our court is a cement-court with some coats of paint on it. I practice long step running on the concrete path near the court. I use to wear YONEX ALL ENGLAND LITE GS SHOES that fits well to my feet, moreover these shoes have good shock absorbing insole and good grips. Neither I am Over-pronated (flat feet) nor with high arched feet.


    After some days of training I am suffering from a pain in both of my lower legs (On the shin bone / Tibial area as shown by red marked area in the picture attached) while running, jogging, taking faster forward steps towards the net. If the shin bone area is firmly pressed then it hurts badly. There is neither swelling nor any small bumps on the shin bone area.

    Is this Shin Splint / Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome (MTSS)?

    I tried hot water bath and some pain reliever gel to get relief from the pain and got relief for a while, but soon after the next practice day it came back. Most important is that no other players of our court are not facing this problem though they are wearing worst type of shoes without insole and cushioning material but only with no marking gum-sole.

    Plz. advice remedy.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. petert1401

    petert1401 Regular Member

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    I think it's very likely to be shin splits. It's most commonly seen in road runners, but anyone who does a lot of running/training on hard surfaces can be vulnerable.

    Sadly I think the only cure is to rest it - stay off concrete courts for a while and, when you come back, try to find somewhere more forgiving to practice your footwork. A spung wooden floor would be ideal.
     
  3. keith.roche

    keith.roche Regular Member

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    And while moving forwards to the net, dont land on the front part of the feet. ALWAYS LAND ON THE HEEL OF THE FEET FIRST, then the toe touches the ground.
     
  4. bradmyster

    bradmyster Regular Member

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    I had the same problem mate. Its a form of shin splints and its due to either collapsed arches or lack of arch support for your feet. See a podiatrist and look at getting some form of orthodics. Thats what fixed my Problems.
     
  5. Joseph

    Joseph Regular Member

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    I had shin splints too. I used to wear some kind of support on my shins before. The problem hasn't resurfaced and lasted for a few months, but there's a slight feeling in the area whenever I move around the court.
     
  6. anirban

    anirban Regular Member

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    Which kind of support on shin did you use? Can you describe plz.?
     
  7. Joseph

    Joseph Regular Member

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  8. anirban

    anirban Regular Member

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  9. bradmyster

    bradmyster Regular Member

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    that support does not fix the problem. It merely relieves some of the pressure. Your shin bone splinters due to excessive force. When your arch of your foot is not shaped properly your legs shock absorbtion system breaks down and doesnt work properly.

    The only way to totally rid yourself of the problem and prevent it happening again is to see a pediatrist and get orthodics made for your feet.
    These will also help prevent knee/hip/back injuries which is especially important in badminton.
     
  10. jolglac

    jolglac New Member

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    I have recently started playing again, and I am quite prone to shin splints. I find that some stretching and warming up is helpful. But what works for me is getting some orthopedic or sports injury style acupuncture. I am an acupuncturist myself, but I find getting a treatment from my buddy is easier then treating myself. It really does help.

    It is more the muscle pulling away from the fascia which is causing the pain. But prevention is key, so stretching, orthodics, better cushioning in better quality shoes are going to be your best bet in prevention. Hope this helps.
     

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