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judging opponents distance from the back line and the net.

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by giant_q_tip, Jun 25, 2008.

  1. giant_q_tip

    giant_q_tip Regular Member

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    ok so im having troubles with pushing my opponents in the back. so that involves clearing.

    when i play i usually drop, drive and smash, sometimes clear but ONLY sometimes (leaning towards rarely xD) the problem is i dont know how to do an offensive clear (only a defensive), im confused with the height, because sometimes im afraid itll turn out to be a drive to the point that they can reach the birdie in time and eventually smash it.

    furthermore, ive been told and have read articles where in doubles you should always smash and never clear. but yet clearing can be used offensively which i still need to learn.

    so my questions are:
    -) how do i perform an offensive clear?
    -) when should i do it?
    -) how do i judge that my opponent is far form the back line (so i can do a clear)?
    -) how can i tell if my opponent is off balance?
    -) what is the REAL purpose of the dropshot? (to kill, get opponent off balance, or bring them closer to the net?)
    -) my opponents sometimes just stand there anticipating my shots pretty well, what should i do (and they stand close to the net, that they can intercept my smashes and drive it back)

    thanks for answering guys itll be very much appreciated
     
    #1 giant_q_tip, Jun 25, 2008
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2008
  2. molohov

    molohov Regular Member

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    i assume you know WHAT an offensive clear is. you could also call it an attacking clear; a fast, flat, somewhat low but still high enough so that its hard to cut out, shot. you have to be in a good position or else your clear will become defensive.
    normally with a clear you would aim for the ceiling or somewhere angled above the horizontal. with an attacking clear, i personally aim nearer to the horizontal to produce the flat shot.

    they don't call em punch clears for nothing. they can be devastating. use them when you are in a good position and your opponent is expecting something else.

    as for judgement, you should take into account what shot has been previously played. for example, if your opponent played a punch clear, they are more than likely still remaining farther to the back line (with respect to the base position). and if they've played a tight net shot, they are much closer to the net with respect to the base position. the most important skill, however, is being able to see your opponent while making your shot. this involves being in position and having good technique.

    the dropshot is good for pulling your opponent to the net and then setting up the rally by pulling them away from the net.

    the obvious answer to the last questoin is: have the vision to see your opponents, then clear it over their heads. if you're a singles player, no clearing makes your game, in my opinoin, too predictable.

    hope this helps
     
  3. jerby

    jerby Regular Member

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    Now, I'd refer you to the badmintonbible. a great contribution by fellow forum member Gollum.
    http://www.badmintonbible.com/articles/singles-tactics/

    How do you tell your opponents position: where his feet are (not just being silly, but it helps depth perception) but also where he's leaning towards, where his eyes are looking at, and where his racket is positioned.
    Dropshots, smashes, almost every shot has more than just 1 purpose (badmintonbible!!! ;))

    When/how to use an attacking clear: just high enough, or fast enough your opponent can't intercept it easily, and is forced to move back.

    as for the anticipation porblem: just keep an eye out for your opponent, work on your deception.

    As for all questions, I think gollum has wrote an amazing article, answering all those questions in much more detail any forum-post can ever hope to achieve... Or would want to ;)
     
  4. Gollum

    Gollum Regular Member

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    Thanks jerby. :) I believe giant_q_tip is talking about doubles, however.

    You might like to check out my doubles tactics article -- in particular, the page about choosing attacking shots.

    My singles article is much more detailed. I'm thinking of applying some of the ideas from my singles article to the doubles article. This won't happen soon, though.

    These are great questions, by the way. I've bookmarked this thread, so I can think about the best way to answer them (later, in an article).
     
    #4 Gollum, Jun 26, 2008
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2008
  5. andrew chan

    andrew chan Regular Member

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    are u guys actually watching ur opponent during the shot? or are u visualising him in your brain? if you guys are actually watching him, how do u do that while playing a shot
     
  6. mojopin

    mojopin Regular Member

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    i see out the "corner of my eye." I dont look at them when i play a shot, just aware of them and what there doing, cause there in your field of vision. Unlike jerby ,i cant see where they're looking unless we are both at the net. Hes got eyes like a hawk that kid.
     
    #6 mojopin, Jun 26, 2008
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2008
  7. giant_q_tip

    giant_q_tip Regular Member

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    oh thanks for those articles :)
     
  8. DaveC

    DaveC Regular Member

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    Andrew, Yes good players actually "sees" their player with their eyes.
    You could start learning to doing it when your opponent send a high shot to you.
    Before the shuttle reach your impact position. Steal a glance at your opponent.
    After a while you will get the idea.
    I have train players that can actually look few times at their opponent before excuting their shots.
    Some of the things you can look for when you look at your opponent:
    Their position.
    The hands & legs position (their stance).
    Their grip they are holding (forehand or backhand).

    Beside looking at your opponent while going to excute a shot. You should also learn to see if they are looking when they are going to hit a shot, If they are not looking at you when they try to make a drop, you can move in to kill that drop.
    Also you can look at what grip they are holding when you are serving. Example : some like to hold a backhand grip to push down your service while other hold a forehand grip.
    With this you will have a good idea where to serve your service. Or even flick the service to their weak handgrip.
     
  9. andrew chan

    andrew chan Regular Member

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    thanks for the tips dave, i'll apply them as soon as possible.
     
  10. giant_q_tip

    giant_q_tip Regular Member

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    ugh alright thanks for those three tips

    ive seen some players get like extra 4 seconds to look around before performing a shot sometimes i wonder how they get those 4 seconds... i guess footwork comes into play in that case.

    thanks btw for the help guys =]
     
  11. Oldhand

    Oldhand Moderator

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    4 seconds? :eek:
    Extra 4 seconds? :eek::eek:

    Are we on long-distance football here? :p
     
  12. giant_q_tip

    giant_q_tip Regular Member

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    well you know i didnt erally mean 4 extra seconds.. SHEESH =/ but like at least 2 seconds

    at least
     
  13. Oldhand

    Oldhand Moderator

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    No way anyone's gonna get '2 seconds at least' :p

    Consider this:

    1. The length of the whole court (baseline to baseline) is 13.40 metres.

    2. At Fu Haifeng's record speed, the shuttle would cover the whole length in less than 0.15 seconds. In fact, in two seconds, the birdie would travel the length of nearly 14 courts laid end-to-end :rolleyes:

    3. If you can manage only a 200 km/hr shot, you'd still cover the length of the court in less than 0.25 seconds. In two seconds, your shuttle would have travelled the length of more than 8 courts laid end-to-end :rolleyes:

    4. Even at a measly 100 km/hr, your shot would reach the opposite baseline
    in less than half a second. In two seconds, the shuttle would be well into the 5th court if arranged end-to-end :rolleyes:

    5. For you to get 'two seconds to look around', the shuttle will have to be travelling at less than 24 km/hr. For this, your opponent will need to be suffering from extreme muscular dystrophy or be hitting balloons instead of shuttlecocks. In fact, at this speed, he could very well run over to your side faster than the birdie :eek:

    No offence meant, giant_q_tip.
    Just having fun with the math...and, of course, with you :D
     
  14. giant_q_tip

    giant_q_tip Regular Member

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    ok ok how about

    1.8 seconds

    at least!!

    if not make it 1.3 seconds =]
     
  15. Oldhand

    Oldhand Moderator

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    To return a smash, make that around one-eighth of a second to look.
    To return a clear, make that around one-half of a second to look ;)
     
  16. giant_q_tip

    giant_q_tip Regular Member

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    ok ok i give up :(
     
  17. DaveC

    DaveC Regular Member

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    I vote for 4 seconds

    It's 4 Split Seconds. hehehehe :p:p:p:p

    :eek: Look
    :confused: Anticpate.
    :rolleyes: Think
    :D React & Smile while you hit the shuttle to take your point and win the game !!!

    :);):p:D = Winner
     
  18. mojopin

    mojopin Regular Member

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    Fu's smash wouldnt travel the court that fast because i think the speed is actually the speed when it leaves the racket. It deaccelerates extrememly fast. Imagine traveling a court in .15 seconds. Thats just silly. Thats 8 courts end to end in 2 seconds is thus quite an overstatment. For a smash, i recon you have about half a second to react and start moving and hit it. For a big clear, about 2.5, but thats only my estimate.
     
  19. DaveC

    DaveC Regular Member

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    For the high clear of 2.5seconds. An exprience player can look at his opponent 3 to 4 times. Even can see his footwork and his racket coverage and even his grip. If there is only 1 second, we can choose to see his position or we can choose to see how he grip his racket and attack his weakest angle.
    If your opponent is a lady, you can choose to look into her eyes as Jerby says .. err or you can look at her "body movement".... :D:D:D:D ;)
     
  20. giant_q_tip

    giant_q_tip Regular Member

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    you remind me of this girl in the club i go to

    oh my GAWD so cute... shes older though by 10 years

    im still a teenager ='[

    but shes cute mhm
     

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