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late/stick smash

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by chiisu, Feb 13, 2008.

  1. chiisu

    chiisu Regular Member

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    can anyone explain to me in more detail how to do the late forehand or stick smash? i read it on badminton bible but i don't get how to hit the birdie withit.
    thanks
     
  2. Gollum

    Gollum Regular Member

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    The main difference is that, because you are taking the shuttle late, you cannot turn your shoulders or body (not by much, anyway).

    So the power comes almost exclusively from your racket arm. It's a shortened swing. To get enough power for a good clear, you need good timing and grip tightening -- the movement must be sharp and snappy.

    Unlike "normal" forehands, you will finish this stroke with your body still side-on (racket side behind non-racket side).
     
  3. sengkiang

    sengkiang Regular Member

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    Golum

    I still do not catch it.
     
  4. Gollum

    Gollum Regular Member

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    Patience. ;)

    Think of it as problem solving: how can you play a smash/clear/drop when the shuttlecock is behind you? Spend a little time on court trying to work out how to do it.

    Eventually, of course, I want to write an article on this. It's quite a hard one to teach, because the players need to develop really good racket arm timing and cannot rely on large body movements to compensate.
     

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