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Learn Badminton Basics from Han Jian

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by Loh, Apr 15, 2004.

  1. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    Players, especially beginners, may wish to benefit from the coaching experience of the Chinese singles maestro, Han Jian, who arrived in Malaysia in 1989 to become its national coach and stayed on to help develop the game in Malaysia for many years now. He helped Malaysia reached the finals of the Thomas Cup in 1990 and won it back in 1992. He has also worked with top ranking internationals like Razif Sidek, Jalani Sidek, Rashid Sidek, Foo Kok Keong, Cheah Soon Kit, Soo Beng Kiang, Wong Choon Hann and other national players and junior players.

    Han Jian was appointed chief coach of the Badminton Academy of Malaysia from 1993 until 1996. He has also been attached to the Pelikan Badminton Academy as its chief coach and is now promoting the game in other states.

    Punch Gunalan, who is a member of the IBF Council and who was a Malaysian champion himself during his playing days, considers Han Jian's footwork as his strong point and no doubt we can learn this from his e-lessons. Even players like Park Joo Bong of South Korea thinks that Han Jian has the best footwork in badminton as he is able to move around the court very smoothly and fluidly. "He seems to be able to move off immediately and effortlessly for the next shot the moment he stops to play one shot."

    Han Jian distinguished himself as a great singles player by winning numerous major international tournaments from the time he started in 1978 to his retirement in 1986. He has been very consistent in his performance and was credited with reaching no less than the quarter-finals in all the tournaments he participated. On most occasions, he either reached the SF or F or won the tournament outright.

    His accomplishments include winning the following:

    1982 - Asian Games (New Delhi)
    1983 - World Cup (Kuala Lumpur)
    1983 - Japan Open
    1983 - China's National Games
    1984 - World Cup (Jakarta)
    1984 - Dutch Open
    1985 - World Championships (Calgary)
    1985 - World Grand Prix Finals
    1985 - Indonesian Open
    1985 - Swedish Open

    apart from other lesser-known individual titles. He also helped China to win the Thomas Cup on their first attempt in London in 1982 and again in Jakarta in 1986.

    Han Jian took up badminton late at the age of 16 and was still able to reach the top when he was about 26, about 10 years of training! I must say he is an exception and many of China's aspirants receive their training at about half that age nowadays. But he is a good example for those who start later because of circumstances. He was born in Liaoning, China, on July 6, 1956.

    The Milo sponsored website address is as follows:

    http://www.milo.com.my/sports.centre/sports_clinic/main.html

    It will be good if you can get hold of his book "Basic Skills of BADMINTON', which he co-authored with Ooi Lay Beng, a sports journalist in 2000.

    Happy browsing and hope you can benefit from his lessons! :p
     
  2. cappy75

    cappy75 Regular Member

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    I think that's where I get the concept of 'destroying balance' to move around the court. The link is very informative and for a short time, I tried to get his book for footwork. Unfortunately, there's not many copies outside of Malaysia and Singapore:(.
     
  3. taneepak

    taneepak Regular Member

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    Loh, there is a new book on badminton by Misbun Sidek, which he and his people were selling at the Yonex stall in the recent Thomas cup round in KL. But it is written in Bahasa Malaysia, which I don't read anymore. I understand it is a great book. It must be unusual because Misbun is quite a maverick himself. His people took down my name and address in Hong Kong, promising to translate it into English and then sending it over to me. I am still waiting! Do you know if the English version is available now?
    Han Jian appears to have settled down in Malaysia, probably because of his business connections. I believe that despite his contributions to badminton in Malaysia, his application for citizenship has been turned down repeatedly. What a shame! Perhaps he should have gone over to Singapore and start a badminton school or academy, sort of seeding the rebirth of badminton in Singapore.
     
  4. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    Ya, Misbun's book should be interesting as you put it, he is rather unconventional! I was in KL for 3 days during the TC qualifiers but was unaware that his book existed. Can't blame me for I was all alone and literally camped at KLBA stadium as they had both the TC and UC matches for almost the entire day! But M'sian fans are rather friendly and you can always join in their discussion in Cantonese.

    Actually I met Misbun, of all places in Bangkok during the Thai Open and said Hi to him, which he acknowledged with surprise. And I also met and took a photo with Han Jian outside KLBA during the last day of the recent TC Q. I wanted to post the pic here but my SLR negative, which I had converted to CD, was somehow not compatible with kwun's system here. I will have to get a digital camera to be able to post pics here. Anyway I have signed up for a 12-session basic course, starting next week, with the Photographic Society of S'pore to learn more.

    For Han Jian to get S'pore citizenship is not so difficult but for him to start a badminton academy with only government help may be difficult. I think a number of Chinese coaches have already obtained citizenship here. The school has to involve private enterprise as Zhao Jianhua has found out to his dismay. That's one reason why Zhao left S'pore for home. The S'pore government has already started the Sports School in Jan. with a first intake of about 10 badminton students aged 12-13 years. There are 7 other sports which are selected.

    During the TCQ, I did visit the largest Japanese 'K?' bookshop at Suria, KLCC and bought a road directory of KL but not Misbun's book. When I was at Bukit Jalil during the 2000 TC in KL, I bought Han Jian's book.

    Maybe I should make a trip again to watch the ABC, which I have been hesitant about as not all the world's top players, esp from China and Indonesia will be playing. If I finally decide to go, I will inquire about Misbun's translation if it is ever published.

    Maybe HongHong should also keep an eye as she will be there enjoying the ABC, in case I can't make it.
     
    #4 Loh, Apr 16, 2004
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2004
  5. Yipom

    Yipom Regular Member

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    The Link Doesn't work
     
  6. kvyra

    kvyra Regular Member

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    yeah dead link here too
     
  7. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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  8. cappy75

    cappy75 Regular Member

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    Loh,

    I think the link is dead. It was there before when I visited it months ago.

     
  9. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    :confused:

    Oh, is it so? Maybe I've downloaded the whole thing and when I click to the website, because it is still there. I have placed the website as one of my favourite links. But just in case, I will break up the long address for the full details and hope you can all get in:

    http://www.milo.com.my/
    sports_centre/
    sports_clinic/main.html

    Failing which I will try other means, though I'm rather poor at such internet facilities.
     
  10. Zhang Ning

    Zhang Ning Regular Member

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    Han Jian got the permanent residency in Malaysia, just like being a PR in SG. I don't think he want to give up his China citizenship though.
     
  11. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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    Han Jian's Lessons on Grips & Footwork

    Han Jian's lessons on grips and footwork, just in case you still could not access the link:


    GRIPS

    To play good badminton, it is absolutely essential to have the correct grip. If you can't even hold the racket properly, forget about everything else. A poor grip will result in you using more arm and shoulder movements to execute your strokes instead of using your wrist.

    Without wristwork, your game would become plain and predictable.

    In the course of a game, a player often has to adjust or change his grip in order to cope with different situations - defend, attack, lob, drop, net - that crop up on court. The grip should not be too tight or too loose. If you hold the racket too tight, you risk locking your wrist. Hold it too loose and you lose racket control.


    BASIC GRIP

    Hold the racket by its throat with your left hand. Let the handle point towards you. The buttof the racket should not jut out from your hand

    Place your left index finger on top of the handle and place your right hand on the handle to form the V groove

    Grip your racket handle with your last three fingers followed by your thumb and forefinger.

    The thumb must rest between the last three fingers and your index finger

    When you tighten the grip, the main pressure should come from the last three fingers while the index finger maintains control


    The basic grip viewed from four different angles. Note that the thumb comes between the index finger and the middle finger. (Sorry pics not transferable as they are moving images)


    Incorrect grips. Four examples of how players hold the racket wrongly. (Again pics not transferable)


    BACKHAND GRIP

    Hold the racket by its throat with your left hand. Let the handle point towards you. The buttof the racket should not jut out from your hand.

    The V between the thumb and forefinger should lie along the top side of the handle in line with the shaft and the outer side of the frame.

    Roll the racket about 30 degrees anti-clockwise so that the V between the thumb and index finger move towards the left side of the racket.
    (Pics not transferrable)


    FOOTWORK I

    DID YOU KNOW?
    In badminton, you must always try to stay on you toes or on the balls of your feet and not come to a complete stop.

    10-POINT CHECK FOR FOOTWORK

    1. Movements are short, explosive, multi-direction, varied in pace and mostly sideways

    2. Involves taking up a ready position (to prepare you to move), the movement itself (number of steps to take) and the finishing. Use the same leg that you use to take the final step to push back and go for the next shot

    3. Stopping and picking up occur simultaneously

    4. To begin movement, the feet must push against the court surface. Get the power to push off by bending your knees

    5. Transfer the body weight in the direction you want to go. Body must point in the direction you want to go while your legs must be positioned in the opposite direction in order to push you forward

    6. To move fast, a player has to lose his balance fast and recover it just as quickly. A new base of support (and a new centre of gravity) has to be established in order to go for the next shot

    7. Use smaller steps first before you proceed to use bigger steps to cover the distance

    8. Stay on your toes or on the balls of your feet. Never stand flat-footed or with your legs straight. Keep your knees bent to enable you to move off at an instant

    9. Try not to come to a complete stop. Shuffle, move your feet, skip or dance lightly on your feet (depending on the situation on the court) as you wait for your opponent's return.

    10. Strive to incorporate every part of your body - legs, hips, waist and ankles - into your footwork.


    RECEIVING SERVICE POSITIONS


    Receiving service on the right side and left side of the court

    Stand sideways with your right leg behind you and facing your opponent to the right (or left, depending on the case). Knees slightly bent and body weight resting on your toes and balls of feet.

    *Legs comfortable about shoulders' width apart.

    *Lean upper body forward.

    *Hold racket at chest level.


    POSITION AFTER SERVICE


    *Stand relaxed and hold the racket up

    *Try to stay on your toes or on the balls of your feet Take up central position

    *Left foot six inches behind right foot

    *Lead with right shoulder

    *Knees slightly bent, lean forward with body weight resting on your toes and balls of feet

    *Shuffle or move on your feet waiting for the return shot


    RECEIVING A SMASH BACKHAND


    *Body weight resting on right leg

    *Bend knees and bring left foot nearer to right

    *Bring your right leg across and lunge to take the smash

    *Bring left leg nearer to right

    Get ready your position. As you feel your body going to the left, turn your body and bring your right leg across, or, lunge for the shot with your left leg to go for the shot.


    RECEIVING A SMASH FOREHAND

    *Body weight resting on left leg.

    *Bend knees and bring right foot nearer to left.

    *Lean body to the right (direction of shuttle)

    *Lunge with your right leg and stretch out hand to take the smash

    Bring your right leg near to your left leg to hasten the fall to your right.


    FOOTWORK II


    MOVING TO THE NET FOREHAND (TWO STEPS)

    *Lower your body with your left leg behind

    *Take first step (smaller) with your left leg

    *Lunge forward with your right leg

    *Bring the left leg closer to your right leg

    Get your ready position with your left leg behind. Take first step with left leg. Lunge with right leg for final step.


    MOVING TO THE NET FOREHAND (ONE STEP)


    *Lower your body with your right leg behind

    *Lunge forward with your right leg

    *Raise your arms and extend it towards the shuttle

    *Bring left foot closer to the right

    Lean your body forward and plant your leg (right one) behind to get your ready position before raking the step need to reach the shot.


    MOVING TO THE NET BACKHAND (TWO STEPS)


    Take first step with left leg. Lunge forward with your right leg. Don't forget to bring your left leg close so that you do not over-extend yourself. Lower your body with your left leg behind

    *Shift the body to the direction you need to go

    *Take the first step (smaller) with left leg

    *Lunge forward with right leg

    *Bring your left leg closer to the right


    MOVING TO THE NET BACKHAND (ONE STEP)

    Use this one-step footwork if your position is close to the net


    *Lower your body with your right leg behind

    *Lunge forward with your right leg

    *Raise your arms and extend it towards the shuttle

    *Bring left foot closer to the right

    MOVING TO THE BASELINE FOREHAND (TWO STEPS)
    FIRST TYPE (WHEN THE RIGHT LEG IS IN FRONT)

    *Lower upper body, bend your knees

    *Right leg in front with body leaning slightly backwards

    *Push off with right leg and turn body clockwise. Bring right shoulder to the direction of shuttle

    *Skip with both legs

    Push off with your right leg and turn your body to get to position. Then skip back with both legs to hit the shuttle


    MOVING TO THE BASELINE FOREHAND (TWO STEPS)
    SECOND TYPE (WHEN THE LEFT LEG IS IN FRONT)

    You can use two fast skips to reach the shuttle employing this footwork

    *Lean your body to the right in the direction of the baseline forehand shot.

    *Use two fast skips to get to the shuttle

    *Both legs should land simultaneously



    Sorry guys, I can't attach any pics. Hope you still find these lessons useful.
     
  12. cappy75

    cappy75 Regular Member

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    Hey Loh,

    Thanks for copying the whole tips from the link! I think what happened was that it was broken but you had a copy on your browser cache:). That's you could read it but not others.

     
  13. taneepak

    taneepak Regular Member

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    I saw Han Jian in 1984/85. He was playing the then Indonesian champion Icuk Sugiato, who was world champion in 1984, and Malaysia's Misbun Sidek. Misbun Sidek with his different colour socks on each foot was also a comtemporary of Han Jian. Han Jian was a little man, but what a dynamo. He did beat both Misbun and Icuk, at least in the matches that I saw.
     
  14. ants

    ants Regular Member

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    Loh.. the bookshop is Kinokuniya. :)

    Han Jian is a great player.. good that he is already a PR in Msia after for so many years. He himself has contributed alot to Msian society in term of Badminton. Too bad he is still struggling.. kinda in a financial difficulty.
     
  15. monto

    monto Regular Member

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  16. Loh

    Loh Regular Member

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  17. shiboos

    shiboos New Member

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  18. waldo98

    waldo98 Regular Member

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    Thanks for the link!
     
  19. john constantin

    john constantin New Member

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    Basic Skills of Badminton

    This wonderful book was written by one the most successful badminton player China ever had, Han Jian. It covers all aspects of badminton and is a good guide for those who want to learn more about the game. Learning the basic skills of the game is a must for every beginner and player who aspires to become a world class player one day. And it’s also a book for those who loves the game and seek for improvements.
     

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    #19 john constantin, Nov 18, 2008
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 20, 2008
  20. youngman

    youngman Regular Member

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