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Looking for a well rounded resource that covers everything I need to know

Discussion in 'Techniques / Training' started by thunderseed, Jan 5, 2016.

  1. thunderseed

    thunderseed New Member

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    I want to learn all techniques and terms and find a well balanced training routine including footwork drills.

    Is there a resource or book anywhere that has all of that in one place? I do not like having to google everything separately or having to read a bajillion different threads. Thanks!

    I've been playing for years and am self taught, so even though I probably use most techniques already, I don't know all the badminton terms. I think I'm a very good player with balanced skills, for example I am both strong and fast, great at attacks and defence.
    So I want to improve all of my skills in general so that I can perfect my playing skills.

    The only skill in particular that I know I need to work on is lunging to return drop shots or any little shots where I have to move forward fast and get low in order to return.

    I have a lower back injury and over the years I developed a really bad habit of bending over to return drop shots!
    I have no problem sprinting up to the net, honestly I have never paid attention to how I get there, but I get there just fine, but as soon as I get there I always use my back to reach or to get lower. It's really bad form, but most of all I can't do that anymore because it hurts my back.
    The worst problem is that in the moment I react without thinking and this is such an ingrained habit that it's going to take a lot for me to teach my body to use lunges instead. I should be using my legs more to get lower, instead of my back anyway.

    But if I can train myself to bend my legs instead of my back, then I will be able to get all of those little shots without aggravating my back injury.
    Aside from doing lunges a lot, I'm not really sure how to train myself to correct this bad habit.

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. amleto

    amleto Regular Member

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    There isn't one-stop shop. Is google really that much hassle?! What leagues/tournaments have you played in? I ask because if you're self taught it's not easy to judge your own skill unless you've played at 'known' levels, be it local league, county/state/whatever.

    You might be surprised how many people think they are 'very good' because they can beat all of their friends, yet none of them even know how to hold the racket properly.

    Another reason I am sceptical is because you say you are very good, yet the one thing you know you need to work on is lunging, which is an absolute basic. Furthermore, the better you are, the more aware of weaknesses you tend to be, in general. So I would expect a 'very good' player to have a whole list of things they would like to improve.

    So reading between the lines I'm going to suggest www.badmintonbible.com for basic intro to some grip terms, tactics, footwork, and shots.


    Do footwork drills.
     
  3. Charlie-SWUK

    Charlie-SWUK Regular Member

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    Hire a coach. A good one at that.

    Just be aware that as a self taught player, you might've developed a style that is considered less efficient or less effective than what that coach knows, and they may correct you on things you don't feel need correcting. It is difficult to hear sometimes, but you will have to listen to them carefully.

    Work on drills when you know you have the correct technique.
     
  4. thunderseed

    thunderseed New Member

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    That you know of.

    It would be shocking if there wasn't a good book about badminton that teaches you everything you really need to know!
     
  5. thunderseed

    thunderseed New Member

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    Want to continue to teach myself, which is why I'm looking for complete books or resources on the subject.
     
  6. thunderseed

    thunderseed New Member

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    I AM looking for a complete list of things to improve ALL skills.
     
  7. thunderseed

    thunderseed New Member

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    I guess I should clarify that. I am looking for a complete book or resource that can help me improve ALL skills, I'm not sure how else to say it, am I not making sense or something?
     
  8. Charlie-SWUK

    Charlie-SWUK Regular Member

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    Watch matches on YouTube.

    There is nothing that will, as a one-size-fits-all, improve everything about your game and provide you with accurate instruction. Movements vary from person to person. It's a complicated sport, and getting feedback from a coach is the best way to progress.
     
  9. thunderseed

    thunderseed New Member

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    There are actual badminton lessons on youtube, but you have to know what you're looking for in order to find them, and I have no clue what to look for seeing as I'm not educated on all the terms, which is why I thought maybe someone's compiled a huge resource of lessons by now for beginners and people who want to learn it all, if no one has already someone should! Either in book form, a bunch of video tutorials, or some other online resource would be great.

    I've been watching these guys since they're known as the best: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zR-R5uuyO1U

    But just like me they both use a lot of forward flexion to reach some shots. Looked like Lin Dan almost took his own back out during that game at one point. I hope I don't offend anyone by this, but I swear that I see better rallys during amateur games. It looks slow and repetitive and they both lack in strength so they can't seem to smash or kill it very well. Maybe I'm the only one in the world who thinks that though.

    I watched a youtube video of Lin Dan working out at the gym: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L51CK6hXtyQ And I was very unimpressed. Am I wrong to be unimpressed? It shocks me because I truly thought that top badminton athletes would do a lot more intense training than that!
     
  10. SSSSNT

    SSSSNT Regular Member

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    Here's a start: https://www.badmintonbible.com/articles
     
  11. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    AFAIK, there is no such resource because there is no big enough financial incentive.

    Also, a lot of the movements are very subtle, rather like playing a musical instrument. You can play a stroke, you can run, but can you string them together and run with grace, control, balance and rhythm? Just like an instrument, reading a book might attempt to explain it but cannot teach it. There is a reason why top performers (badminton or music) still take lessons even whilst they are performing. You just can't learn it from a book.
     
    #11 Cheung, Jan 5, 2016
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2016
  12. sebZeroToHeroes

    sebZeroToHeroes Regular Member

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    Something you could do is record yourself playing and review it afterwards. You'll see how the way you play differs from the pros.
    And possibly also ask for external help (either here or on sites like Zero to Heroes, a site I'm building with a friend specifically for this purpose).
     
  13. Rykard

    Rykard Regular Member

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    why do you not want to hire a coach?

    Quite often i think I am doing the right thing, because it 'feels' right, but a coach will put me right, sometimes the changes can be very subtle...

    you shouldn't be sprinting forward, it should be controlled steps. Getting the basic footwork right is the basis for everything, boring I know but you have to start with a solid movement foundation.
     
  14. Kikuhito Senshi

    Kikuhito Senshi Regular Member

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    Sounds to me like you should just enter tournaments ....

    The Olympics are in Rio this year and the likes of LD, LCW, etc. are slow, lack strength and are repetitive ... see you in the final :rolleyes:
     
  15. Arrowken

    Arrowken Regular Member

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    Perhaps you should consider learning other dimensions of the game, etc tactics. If you thought lin dan and lcw's games are slow and repetitive, you probably dont have a good understanding of tactics in badminton. The reason why they dont go crazy and smash from everywhere is a combination of strategy (not wasting energy when not needed) and because the opposing player returns shuttles so well they are not able to attack them.

    Yes, amateur rallies are probably more exciting, especially those plastic shuttles ones. The plays can attack bad clears and their defence is poor that they just lift it right back for another smash..

    I suppose this is very difficult to teach in a book/website
     
  16. Cheung

    Cheung Moderator

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    You might be able to see it but it takes a trained eye to analyse it and a specific designed routine to change the old habit. That's where video analysis falls down as a resource. Too many people think they can teach themselves from a video. It can only take you a limited step upwards and then you hit the ceiling. Even if you put more effort and strength in, run more, run faster, play more, get fitter, that ceiling is still there for the self taught player.

    To break through that barrier you need a fundamental breakdown of all techniques and build up good basic technique, consistency that fits together like a jigsaw puzzle. This you can only get by coaching and routines and a lot of patience.

    Why do I know this so well? Because this is exactly my story! I was self taught, watched a lot of videos, played a lot of matches and was quite good. Better than the social but it was always quite tough against the better players even with utmost effort. In those days, it was harder to find a coach and due to life circumstances, couldn't get one long term. After a number of years, I had moved to a badminton country (great!) and suddenly had more time. This time with the willingness to spend time and money on my hobby (badminton is cheaper than golf), I got a coach. I had access to even more videos because in Asia, we get lots of footage of badminton. But I still got a coach. Why? Because I wanted to break through that ceiling and I was prepared to build up from all the way down the bottom upwards.

    It took me a year and a half with the coach, analysing myself, training basic techniques, many routines, taking competition problems back to him, watching videos and tactics playing different styles, learning how to control the game, learning about pace. Conclusion? I wish I got the coaching earlier in life!! All those years of badminton wasted because I was self taught (OK, I did have some excuses). If I had taken lessons earlier, I could have whipped more arses on court.
     
  17. R20190

    R20190 Regular Member

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    There is no resource that will cover everything - Full stop.

    Text will only get you so far - usually not far enough. The rest will be down to a good coach or yourself.
     
  18. nthanhhai

    nthanhhai Regular Member

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    Tell me when you get one.

    Do other sports have any book like what you are asking?
     
  19. thunderseed

    thunderseed New Member

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    Yeah obviously, books, videos, all types of resources.
     
  20. amleto

    amleto Regular Member

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    Soccer is one of the most popular sports in the world - please could you show this magic resource for soccer? Apparently it's obvious but I have never seen hide nor hair of it.

    here's a playlist of basic coaching vids from BWF:
    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1132B45B30FD92D3
     
    #20 amleto, Jan 6, 2016
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2016

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